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View Karda's profile

HELP

by Karda
posted 08-24-2017 11:45 PM


35 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7469 posts in 2683 days


#1 posted 08-24-2017 11:52 PM

Put the chuck key in it, hold the spindle as good as you can, however you can, and whack the key with a wood mallet or similar. Don’t go nuts, but with a little impact, it should break it loose. In the future, you may want to put a plastic washer between the chuck and spindle. You can buy them or just make one.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#2 posted 08-25-2017 01:05 AM

thanks brad that worked I wished they had put spots on the spindle nut like they did the face plate

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2417 posts in 3428 days


#3 posted 08-25-2017 06:41 AM

Ditto on the plastic washer

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12894 posts in 2864 days


#4 posted 08-25-2017 07:15 AM

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

676 posts in 1785 days


#5 posted 08-25-2017 01:02 PM

Glad you got it off but be careful whacking the chuck key. I would clamp a rod (like a 1/2” bowl gouge) between the jaws and use it for leverage.
I don’t use the plastic washers but lots of folks make them from milk jugs or similar items.
If you have a handwheel you may be able to drill a hold through it and use the knockout bar to lock it. My lathe has a spindle lock but the knockout bar fits the holes already in my Nova handwheel perfectly. Makes sure the pin for the spindle lock stays functional for indexing … some folks have sheared the pin off.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5225 posts in 4444 days


#6 posted 08-25-2017 02:42 PM

+1 on the plastic washer. Made my life easier.
Bill

-- [email protected]

View JollyGreen67's profile

JollyGreen67

1676 posts in 3247 days


#7 posted 08-25-2017 08:40 PM

Zero on the plastic washer, as it can create wobble in the chuck. To prevent the chuck from “welding” itself to the spindle, do not spin it on until it bangs against the spindle stop. Gently turn it until it firmly seats.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#8 posted 08-25-2017 08:53 PM

ok thanks

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3852 days


#9 posted 08-25-2017 08:59 PM

Like router bits, I use rubber O-rings to prevent sticking collets and chucks

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#10 posted 08-25-2017 09:42 PM

The hand wheel is threaded so that if I untighten it loosens the hand wheel. there are 2 shallow .25 inch holes in the spindle nut. I put the tip of a bolt i that for an opposite turn and it worked but is is so precarious that if I had a real bad jam the bolt might not hold. I don’t tighten the chuck tight just firm but the worm screw cam loose put everything way out of balan ce.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12894 posts in 2864 days


#11 posted 08-25-2017 10:20 PM



Zero on the plastic washer, as it can create wobble in the chuck.
- Jimbo4

On a metal lathe it would matter, on a wood lathe it doesn’t matter. The wood moves more than the runout introduced by a plastic washer, I’ve measured it. Matter of fact, not cleaning the threads between removing and reseating the chuck, caused more runout than the plastic washer.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7469 posts in 2683 days


#12 posted 08-25-2017 10:35 PM

I’m having trouble figuring out how it would introduce any wobble at all… even on a metal lathe.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12894 posts in 2864 days


#13 posted 08-25-2017 10:40 PM

Well everything introduces runout. The chuck introduces runout. Dust introduces runout. But you’ll be measuring it in thousandths of an inch. I can put an indicator on my chuck and make the needle move with finger pressure. Even the best wood lathes are crude compared to high end metal lathes. But if I’m turning a bowl and stop for 5 minutes, the bowl is out of round when I come back so what will 0.0015” matter from using a plastic washer?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1613 posts in 2214 days


#14 posted 08-26-2017 03:42 PM

Mike, get a piece of junk mail, punch a hole the size of your spindle, and install the chuck. Rip the excess paper from the spindle, and do your business. When you need to remove your chuck, it should come off pretty easy.

Now, with that said, if you had a Chuck Plate, you wouldn’t have a need to remove your chuck or use that worm screw. I have 3 of them. Never been used. And, I don’t even own a face plate for my PM, my go to lathe. . . ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#15 posted 08-26-2017 05:14 PM

yea but my lathe is short if all I did was bowel or christmas ornaments that would be ok. But if I want to make a tool handle ot something long I might not have enough room with the chuck on. What is a chuck plate

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1613 posts in 2214 days


#16 posted 08-26-2017 07:59 PM

I’m glad you axed, Mike. It is a plate that goes into the chuck. There is no need to remove the chuck when you are about to start a new bowel. You must turn everything mounted with a Chuck Plate between centers. You can even start spindles that are about 1 1/2” square, and so far, the largest piece I’ve mounted is over 19” and weighing in at over 100 pounds. I also use it at the tenon removal process. If you really want to see what it is, go to my youtube channel and look for the video. You could also go to my website listed just after Tucson in my signature…... ................ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#17 posted 08-26-2017 08:20 PM

ok thanks

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

472 posts in 3519 days


#18 posted 08-27-2017 07:31 PM

I’ve used a strap wrench on the spindle handle to grab the spindle and unscrew the chuck when it was stuck.

I have since made a DIY plastic washer to keep it from getting stuck. The first try was some plastic from the recycling bin that wasn’t perfectly even, and it introduced enough wobble that it bothered me. The second pass, I chose the piece more carefully to get one that was flat enough that I couldn’t measure how much it was out.

For a 1” thread spindle, I drilled a 7/8” hole in the plastic, mounted it on the spindle and held in place by the chuck. Then I trimmed the outside with a turning tool (I used a skew, but any sharp tool should be fine). I haven’t had a stuck chuck since.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#19 posted 08-27-2017 08:53 PM

strap wrench on turn handle won’t work to losen because it loosens the turn wheel before the chuck and there is no way to lock it

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

472 posts in 3519 days


#20 posted 08-27-2017 09:22 PM



strap wrench on turn handle won t work to losen because it loosens the turn wheel before the chuck and there is no way to lock it

- Karda


On my mini-lathe, the handle uses a left-hand thread and the chuck uses a right hand thread. YMMV

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

428 posts in 2769 days


#21 posted 08-28-2017 12:39 PM

The plastic washers will deform with usage. I would not use them or paper. I use never seize on mine and have used candle wax. This provides lubrication to the threads in addition to prevent the chuck from being stuck.

-- Bill R

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2479 days


#22 posted 08-28-2017 02:41 PM

How about aluminum foil? It is pretty uniform thickness and finds a lot of such uses in machine set up because of that.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7469 posts in 2683 days


#23 posted 08-28-2017 03:32 PM

I had no choice on my PM45… the spindle was too long and not threaded all the way to the shoulder, so the chuck would not thread all the way on, leaving a gap between them. A washer made out of HDPE (recycled milk jugs) was turned on the lathe to just slightly less than 1/4” thick, so the chuck would butt up against it instead of just hanging out in never never land:

I get no measurable run-out, and the chuck is easily removed because of it. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

428 posts in 2769 days


#24 posted 08-28-2017 06:03 PM



I had no choice on my PM45… the spindle was too long and not threaded all the way to the shoulder, so the chuck would not thread all the way on, leaving a gap between them. A washer made out of HDPE (recycled milk jugs) was turned on the lathe to just slightly less than 1/4” thick, so the chuck would butt up against it instead of just hanging out in never never land:

I get no measurable run-out, and the chuck is easily removed because of it. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Brad, you can get a precision steelspindle spacer from the Woodturning store. It use to be on his website, but now says to email him for info. I think it was about $9. That is what I used on my PM 90. I initially use plastic, but it eventually kept getting worse. The steel is much better.

-- Bill R

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

676 posts in 1785 days


#25 posted 08-28-2017 07:27 PM

You can also use a thrust bearing washer such as these. Precision ground flat.
I’m sure they have most any size.
https://www.amazon.com/Koyo-TRD-2031-Thrust-Roller-Bearing/dp/B006KT3AUC/ref=pd_sbs_328_1/143-6739425-0232945?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B006KT3AUC&pd_rd_r=RX68SEY2ECDSVT2E8468&pd_rd_w=a0dOr&pd_rd_wg=HU6q7&psc=1&refRID=RX68SEY2ECDSVT2E8468
I haven’t use one but would think that both surfaces would not seize up at the same time allowing a chuck to be removed with minimum effort. But that is just a guess.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12894 posts in 2864 days


#26 posted 08-28-2017 09:07 PM

You need some elasticity and shock absorption in a washer to stop the chuck from sticking, fiber works, plastic works, steel won’t work. I haven’t had any deformation problems but I only spin my chuck on hand tight and I tend to lose the washers long before I wear them out. They cost nothing to make. There are a lot of knee jerk reactions about plastic (hdpe lids) but I’ve tested them and this isn’t theory.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#27 posted 08-29-2017 01:04 AM

thanks for the suggestions I made a plastic washer, that has becime the lest of my worries, some of my wood might be molding and Im affraid I might has to junk it

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1613 posts in 2214 days


#28 posted 08-29-2017 03:18 AM

Don’t fret, turn it wet….......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#29 posted 08-29-2017 03:21 AM

ok but how do I deal with the mold when is done

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12894 posts in 2864 days


#30 posted 08-29-2017 03:55 AM

I’ve never had mold but I would think you could cut it off. Problem is that if you have mold, you probably also have mildew. You need a drier storage area. Is it off the ground and out of the weather?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#31 posted 08-29-2017 04:19 AM

it is in my cellar, we have had a lot of rain this summer

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1613 posts in 2214 days


#32 posted 08-29-2017 02:36 PM

Mike, I suppose if you turned it thin enough, it would dry quicker than the mold would grow. Put it in a paper bag after turning it thin. Do not use plastic. You could also put it up on a shelf unbagged and watch it either deform beautifully, or get a crack from hell.

You have to remember that I live in Arizona where mold is almost non existent, unless it’s growth promoted by the person wanting it. I’m speaking as a Tucson resident, whereas Phoenix might get more mold as that area of the state usually has a little more humidity.. . .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1657 posts in 1038 days


#33 posted 08-29-2017 05:14 PM

ok Jerry thanks

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

428 posts in 2769 days


#34 posted 08-29-2017 05:41 PM


You need some elasticity and shock absorption in a washer to stop the chuck from sticking, fiber works, plastic works, steel won t work. I haven t had any deformation problems but I only spin my chuck on hand tight and I tend to lose the washers long before I wear them out. They cost nothing to make. There are a lot of knee jerk reactions about plastic (hdpe lids) but I ve tested them and this isn t theory.

- Rick M

We each have our own opinion. I don’t want my chuck to be “cushioned”. I want it up against a machine surface. If you have properly machined surfaces it will not get stuck using a lubricant on the threads. IMO using plastic as a mating surfaces causes more problems then it solves.

-- Bill R

View JollyGreen67's profile

JollyGreen67

1676 posts in 3247 days


#35 posted 08-30-2017 05:09 PM

Bill R – EXACTLY CORRECT! But, with all the responses that a ‘cushion’ between the lathe and the chuck is a good idea will get us swamped with comments.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

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