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View TigerFan07's profile

Advise needed on walls

by TigerFan07
posted 08-02-2017 01:59 AM


25 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4042 days


#1 posted 08-02-2017 02:10 AM

You can get mold resistant drywall.

View squazo's profile

squazo

124 posts in 2039 days


#2 posted 08-02-2017 03:00 AM

it wont mold, mine isnt moldy my friends arent moldy my parents, brothers, uncles, arent moldy. think about how many garages there are that have dry wall and arent air conditioned. I live in Louisiana. Besides OSB will mold all the same.

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 898 days


#3 posted 08-02-2017 03:58 AM

I would say that if you have a shop that is so high in humidity that the drywall or OSB will mold then you will need to run a dehumidifier or probably not use that building for a wood working shop. Not because of the wood, but because of what it will do to your machines.
There is dry wall and there is fireproof drywall…the fireproof stuff is good, it’s also heavy…it’s also about $3.00 or so more a board, but it is what should be in a garage. The other thing is…South Carolina in the summer…trying to do wood working in a shop with no air conditioning????? Humidity would not be my first concern. If I owned the state of South Carolina and hell…I’d rent out S.C. and live in hell!!!!

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pauljuilleret

107 posts in 2047 days


#4 posted 08-02-2017 11:31 AM

why don’t you use plywood get them with one face sanded and heavy enough that it will allow you to hang stuff where you want it to go. just a thought for you to consider.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3693 days


#5 posted 08-02-2017 11:35 AM

Why is it insulated if it won’t be conditioned space?

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

1000 posts in 3370 days


#6 posted 08-02-2017 12:16 PM

I did OSB in my standalone shop because it is smaller and I’m always moving things around, shoving them against wall etc. I figured I would be constantly patching holes in drywall. Plus, I can attach/mount smaller things.

Will you also be using garage for cars and needing to move equipment around?

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3429 posts in 1782 days


#7 posted 08-02-2017 01:33 PM

If there is enough moisture to grow mold, then just about anything you put up may have the same problem, including plywood. Using a mold resistant drywall may actually be better than any of the the alternatives to drywall. You can also get a paint additive that will add a little extra mold resistance as well.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View TigerFan07's profile

TigerFan07

8 posts in 707 days


#8 posted 08-02-2017 10:12 PM

I guess I should say that it won’t be conditioned all the time. I plan to use a window unit in the summer and space heater in the winter but just while I’m in there to knock the edge off.

Other than fire resistance, does drywall have any advantages? I do like the idea of being able to hang stuff more places with OSB.

If I go with drywall, is it a mistake to leave it unpainted and not taped/mudded (other than the looks)?

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12814 posts in 2774 days


#9 posted 08-02-2017 11:25 PM

When people get mold, it’s often because of condensation from improper moisture barrier, assuming it isn’t a leaky roof or some other really obvious cause. You want to keep moisture out but the walls still need to breath and let moisture escape or you get mold. So drywall will be fine if the wall is constructed correctly. That aside, my walls are wood and I like being able to hang anything anywhere.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

270 posts in 727 days


#10 posted 08-02-2017 11:58 PM

I’m in SC and decided to do OSB in my garage. Sheet rock would look better if you take the time to tape it, paste it, sand it and then paint it, but it is definitely easier to ding up than OSB.

Personally, I like the look of OSB and haven’t had any problems with it at all.

Someone else mentioned why insulate it if you aren’t using AC….. for me personally, I wanted the potential to eventually AC it if I like and didn’t want to have to undo what I had already done to insulate after the fact. Insulation is cheap enough that it just made sense to do it while I was putting the OSB up.

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

612 posts in 1856 days


#11 posted 08-03-2017 12:04 AM

Rick M, and lazyman are both right. Anything you put over the fiberglass can mold with out the proper vapor barrier.
Where I live its dry, and most everyone has stucco and 2X4 walls on most homes. In general, not a lot of mold hear in the desert, but.
I had mold on the fiberglass insulation when I demoed my shower last year for a remodel. Not a big shock since the shower was falling apart.
There are some really good mold resistant drywall products, and paint out there.
Taping is as important as the vapor barrier. Seals everything up well. Texture and paint is a good protective barrier for the sheet rock. And it too looks good.
You should check and see what is needed for your structure in your area.
Also, you can hang anything from it as long as you find a stud to anchor to. And drywall is super easy to repair and maintain. everything will get a ding and scratch in it. A little mud and paint and it all goes away.
What is your shop constructed from. Block, stucco, etc. Also with unfinished walls. Do you have all the electrical done that you want? My shop/garage was pre finished and insulated. So when I needed to add electical outlets , all the conduit had to be run on the outside of the drywall.
I tried to buy my house with the garage unfinished, but I just could not get the builder to go for it.

-- John

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 3259 days


#12 posted 08-03-2017 12:11 AM

Why insulate even though the garage isn’t heated or air conditioned….because it moderates the temperature swings of the garage and reduces sound.

My garage was unfinished, i decided to insulate and put up some cheap paneling (cheapest Lowes had) afterwards the temperature never drops below 50 degrees even on the coldest winter days and on the hottest summer days when I get home from work and open the garage door I can feel the cool air dump out of the garage from 10 ft away.

If drywall is unpainted it will eventually turn a dark brown grocery paper bag color. The ceiling of my garage was not taped, mudded or painted and had turned the same color as a paper bag. Painted it white and now the garage is a lot brighter with the same amount of lights.

View clin's profile

clin

1035 posts in 1390 days


#13 posted 08-03-2017 12:50 AM



Why is it insulated if it won t be conditioned space?

- jonah

Because, even if not heated or cooled, the temperature swings will be much lower through the day. This generally means it will stay cooler in the summer.

I even insulated my storage shed. It probably peaks in the summer 10-15 degrees cooler than the outside. If it were un-insulated, it would be much hotter than outside, due to the sun beating on it. This greatly reduces the temperature swings on the stuff I store in there. So they’ll hold up better over time.

-- Clin

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1314 days


#14 posted 08-03-2017 01:13 PM

TigerFan07,

If I go with drywall, is it a mistake to leave it unpainted and not taped/mudded (other than the looks)?

My understanding is that drywall that is not taped compromises its fire rating to some degree. Taped with one coat of joint compound should seal things up, but over time, the tape could fail and work loose. Therefore, at least two coats of joint compound would be better than one coat of joint compound if you tape the joints.

The reason I would paint the drywall would be to 1) make the surface reflective and 2) to resist staining. While my garage workshop is painted, I wish I had gone with a more reflective semi-gloss or gloss white paint. The smoother surface makes cleaning a bit easier should you ever wish to remove dust and restore the light reflective properties of the paint in the future. A mildicide could be added to the paint to resist mold.

Some ideas that would make installing heavier items on the wall easier, whether covered with OSB or drywall, are to mark the floor on each side of the wall studs. When the time comes to hang a cabinet, locating the studs would become very easy. In addition to marking the stud locations, some 2×6 or 2×8 blocking could be installed in locations where you envision hanging cabinets and other heavy items before covering the walls. The blocking would allow hanging the cabinets without having to locate studs and then determining where to place the screws inside the cabinet. Of course, one would need to remember where the blocking is horizontally and vertically located.

View r33tc0w's profile

r33tc0w

174 posts in 878 days


#15 posted 08-03-2017 01:23 PM

Goto atticfoil.com and place a radiant barrier between the drywall and the exterior. You’ll be suprised how much cooler it’ll be and easier it’ll be to cool if you choose to AC the space

-- Matthew 13:53-58

View ArtMann's profile (online now)

ArtMann

1385 posts in 1210 days


#16 posted 08-03-2017 05:42 PM

Another problem with drywall is it has no strength. That presents a couple of problems I can think of. First, it is going to be very easy to dent or poke a hole in a shop wall if you work with large and heavy material. The second thing is that mounting even light stuff to the wall is going to require you locate studs to anchor it to.

Drywall has to be finished and painted if you don’t want your shop to be drab and dark. I am a do-it yourself-er and I hate finishing drywall. What I did was buy 7/16” 4X8 sheets of masonite exterior grade siding. it came pre-primed with a very light grey color that I found attractive with no top coat. If I want to hang something light to the wall, it is strong enough that I ignore the studs and just screw the mount directly in the wall.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

981 posts in 945 days


#17 posted 08-03-2017 05:46 PM

I built a nice big building at the house I just sold and I used OSB on the walls and painted it white. It looked good and I could hang stuff where ever I wanted Plus I didn’t have to worry about accidently putting a hole it in.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12814 posts in 2774 days


#18 posted 08-03-2017 07:23 PM

I feel like wood walls are better for moisture control. My yard stays fairly moist because we have a high water table but my shop is raised off the ground and it’s all wood. Nothing rusts in my shop unless I spill water on it and don’t clean it. (Well things will “eventually” rust, if unused for a year or so.) The air space underneath no doubt helps considerably too. It might be that more than the walls. Never really thought about it before but one or both really help to keep my shop dry.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5549 posts in 2887 days


#19 posted 08-03-2017 07:59 PM

May last 2 shops were free standing buildings, one 24×24, the second 24×32, and I put drywall up in both of them. Your question has pretty much been answered, but to me drywall is : cheaper, quieter, looks nicer once painted, and is so easy to repair who cares about the occasional gouges and dents (don’t forget the fire stuff mentioned above). As for the hanging anything anywhere, I do it anyway. Yo might have to improvise to span the studs with a french cleat, or piece of slatwall, or whatever…but you can hang anything anywhere you want on drywall. The one thing you can’t do is put a nail anywhere and expect it to hold something…that’s also OK for me. Frankly, I find the look of OSB to be so bad I wouldn’t use it under any circumstances. Of course, all that is just my opinion.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View ArtMann's profile (online now)

ArtMann

1385 posts in 1210 days


#20 posted 08-04-2017 01:46 AM

My opinion of the appearance of OSB is similar to Fred’s. Other than that, I believe it would work well.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1078 posts in 2679 days


#21 posted 08-29-2017 02:05 AM

TigerFan,

Judging by your name, I’d guess you’re somewhere in the Upstate. I’m in Spartanburg and have drywall in my shop/garage. I have no issues with mold whatsoever, and none my my tools have any sign of rust.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View TigerFan07's profile

TigerFan07

8 posts in 707 days


#22 posted 08-30-2017 01:04 AM

Thanks for all of the replies. I decided to go with the mold resistant drywall.

View RDan's profile

RDan

101 posts in 2718 days


#23 posted 08-30-2017 01:32 AM

Even with drywall take the time to block between the studs. I have done it in my basement shop and kid game dungeon. In places where I know I may have a counter, I have placed it to hang a shelf or attach your lower cabinets. I use the Kreg HD pocket hole jig and screws to mount the blocking. Makes it easy to hang french cleats or peg board and not worry about the weight. Dan

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3448 posts in 3503 days


#24 posted 08-30-2017 02:55 AM



Even with drywall take the time to block between the studs. I have done it in my basement shop and kid game dungeon. In places where I know I may have a counter, I have placed it to hang a shelf or attach your lower cabinets. I use the Kreg HD pocket hole jig and screws to mount the blocking. Makes it easy to hang french cleats or peg board and not worry about the weight. Dan

- RDan

One of my sons works construction for a high end contractor, building and remodeling multi-million dollar homes. That blocking is something that they do as a matter of course when framing. Seems overkill to have a piece of wood to screw a toilet paper holder to, but the first time someone goes to stand up, and grabs that bracket to keep from falling, and the thing doesn’t fall off the wall, they realize the quality. Repeat work and referrals are the lifeblood of that business. Those little extras make it happen.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3448 posts in 3503 days


#25 posted 08-30-2017 02:57 AM



Thanks for all of the replies. I decided to go with the mold resistant drywall.

- TigerFan07

You might want to check on your local building codes before you do the drywall. Light framing without the extra drywall weight allows for a much smaller header above the garage door, for instance. It has to do with seismic stability.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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