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most common wood used for Craftsman style furniture

by metroplexchl
posted 07-30-2017 02:59 AM


13 replies so far

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

20288 posts in 2243 days


#1 posted 07-30-2017 03:05 AM

Lots of oak. Red and white.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4034 days


#2 posted 07-30-2017 03:08 AM

Stickley used a lot of quartersawn oak. They
fumed in with ammonia to get the dark color.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

4476 posts in 976 days


#3 posted 07-30-2017 04:33 AM

Quarter sawn White Oak. Period.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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BurlyBob

6213 posts in 2652 days


#4 posted 07-30-2017 04:40 AM

Another vote for quarter sawn white oak.

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splintergroup

2678 posts in 1609 days


#5 posted 07-30-2017 01:38 PM

Wood with strong grain patterns, QS oak primarily, but there are other choices and combos that would be fitting to the style.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11575 posts in 3815 days


#6 posted 07-30-2017 02:08 PM

Gotta go with Rich on this one.
Visited the Stickley museum in Parsippany NJ, and saw a lot of his original work. All qtr. sawn white oak.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2416 days


#7 posted 07-30-2017 02:34 PM

I grew up in my Great Grandmother’s house built in 1905. I love Craftsman style. Actually did not know it had a name until I researched what & how to go about redoing my window casings & trim.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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bondogaposis

5398 posts in 2738 days


#8 posted 07-30-2017 02:37 PM

Quarter sawn white oak.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3210 posts in 2644 days


#9 posted 07-30-2017 09:34 PM

Chris, QSWO is most common but QS red oak can be used depending on the intended finish and can’t easily be distinguished from qswo. You may also find pieces made from mahogany, maple and chestnut. G&G used teak and mahogany in the Gamble House. It is getting difficult to find GREAT qswo, but take a look at McKinney Hardwoods Michael won’t steer you wrong. HTH

-- Art

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 691 days


#10 posted 07-31-2017 12:08 AM

Wow. Love all the experience.

I assumed WO, but there’re times when I swear something I see is made of RO….or WO that’s been stained to look like RO. Not sure why they’d do that, but whatever works!

I’ve always loved oak, but I’ve recently fell in love with curly and birds eye maple…although i’ve never worked with either one before!

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View WoodES's profile

WoodES

146 posts in 2078 days


#11 posted 07-31-2017 04:45 AM

Greene & Greene used a lot of mahogany. Current day A&C use many different types of wood, details can define the A&C look over wood species.

View BobLang's profile

BobLang

170 posts in 3787 days


#12 posted 07-31-2017 05:20 PM

Original Gus Stickley pieces were predominantly quartersawn white oak, but mahogany and figured maple were also offered. Judging by what appears in auctions mahogany and maple were not very popular. In my opinion the designs work well with any quality hardwood, cherry and walnut for example. I don’t consider red oak as usable for nice furniture.

-- Bob Lang, https://readwatchdo.com

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 691 days


#13 posted 08-01-2017 12:46 AM



Greene & Greene used a lot of mahogany. Current day A&C use many different types of wood, details can define the A&C look over wood species. – WoodES

Good point! From what i’ve read of the founders of the movement, their focus was on craftsmanship (away from production line crap) and not wood.

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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