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View metroplexchl's profile

How to properly store wood

by metroplexchl
posted 07-27-2017 03:20 AM


27 replies so far

View Drevo's profile

Drevo

11 posts in 1279 days


#1 posted 07-27-2017 04:25 AM

I prefer storing wood horizontally, stickered and weighted , especially if it”s rough cut. If it’s dry and pre milled, you can store it vertically but my shop doesn’t really allow for it. You’ll have to either build a lumber rack or stack it on the floor. I’m sure you”ll get many opinions on this site on how to store your lumber. Welcome.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1816 posts in 2870 days


#2 posted 07-27-2017 11:29 AM

If the wood is dry, flat stack it. This keeps the gain/loss of moisture at a minimum. If kiln dried and not stored in a heated and cooled space (climate controlled), the wood will pick up moisture from the humidity in the air and will equilibrate to about 12 – 15%. So, if it was kiln dried to 8%, this moisture gain is undesirable. If stored in a non climate controlled space, flat stack it so that there is no air flow and covering the stack with plastic will drastically slow and moisture gain.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1042 days


#3 posted 07-27-2017 11:44 AM

I store mine in the rafters. This arrangement has seen temperatures from 12° to 120° F. As mentioned above … stickered and weighted is key!
 

 
I store cut-offs at the base of a raised platform directly beneath the “lumber loft” ...
 

 
BUT … depending on what I’m working on at the time … I have lumber stored all over the place!
 

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

515 posts in 2126 days


#4 posted 07-27-2017 04:53 PM

My workshop is in my basement (climate controlled) and that is where I store my lumber. I think you could probably keep large quantities outside (stickered and covered from rain), but when you want to use some it might not be a bad idea to bring what you need inside and let it acclimate for a couple weeks before milling it to final dimensions.

I’m no expert, so consider the source.

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#5 posted 07-27-2017 10:24 PM



I prefer storing wood horizontally, stickered and weighted , especially if it”s rough cut. If it s dry and pre milled, you can store it vertically but my shop doesn t really allow for it. You ll have to either build a lumber rack or stack it on the floor. I m sure you”ll get many opinions on this site on how to store your lumber. Welcome.

- Drevo

Thank you sir! When you say “stickered”, i assume you put wood type, date purchased, dimensions?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#6 posted 07-27-2017 10:27 PM



If the wood is dry, flat stack it. This keeps the gain/loss of moisture at a minimum. If kiln dried and not stored in a heated and cooled space (climate controlled), the wood will pick up moisture from the humidity in the air and will equilibrate to about 12 – 15%. So, if it was kiln dried to 8%, this moisture gain is undesirable. If stored in a non climate controlled space, flat stack it so that there is no air flow and covering the stack with plastic will drastically slow and moisture gain.

- WDHLT15

Thanks for the advice. I’m really new, so all my wood will come from big box stores until i learn more. Does Lowes and Home Despot kiln dry their lumber? I will advance eventually to rough cut stuff I think, but I don’t want to waste that beautiful wood on an unskilled woodworker!

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#7 posted 07-27-2017 10:29 PM



My workshop is in my basement (climate controlled) and that is where I store my lumber. I think you could probably keep large quantities outside (stickered and covered from rain), but when you want to use some it might not be a bad idea to bring what you need inside and let it acclimate for a couple weeks before milling it to final dimensions.

I m no expert, so consider the source.

- Bill_Steele

What about in my garage? It’s certainly not climate controlled, but it would keep out the rain. It would get to ambient temps though…


-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#8 posted 07-27-2017 10:31 PM



I store mine in the rafters. This arrangement has seen temperatures from 12° to 120° F. As mentioned above … stickered and weighted is key!
 
I store cut-offs at the base of a raised platform directly beneath the “lumber loft” ...
 
BUT … depending on what I m working on at the time … I have lumber stored all over the place!

cool set up! If it gets 120 in that shed, wouldn’t those really long boards start to bow and sag?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3693 days


#9 posted 07-27-2017 10:40 PM


Thank you sir! When you say “stickered”, i assume you put wood type, date purchased, dimensions?

- metroplexchl


No, you use wood “stickers” (little strips, basically) to stack the wood so it gets consistent airflow on all six sides. That equalizes any moisture gain and greatly mitigates warping.

The little wood strips in between the boards are the stickers. You line them up so air can flow in and around the boards.

I’d recommend going to a good hardwood lumber dealer. Most will offer jointing, planing, and cutting services for relatively small fees. You’ll save money and end up with much, much better lumber than any big box store. They have the most awful lumber imagineable stored in a way that guarantees it’ll warp. Stay far, far away.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

797 posts in 2028 days


#10 posted 07-27-2017 10:40 PM

Sticker in the wood means placing spacers between each layer of your wood pile. This allows air movement on all surfaces of each board and helps maintain even moisture content.

The stickers should all be the same size to ensure the boards remain flat and have less tenancy to warp, twist or cup. It’s also a good idea to add some weight to the top.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#11 posted 07-28-2017 12:47 AM


I d recommend going to a good hardwood lumber dealer. Most will offer jointing, planing, and cutting services for relatively small fees. You ll save money and end up with much, much better lumber than any big box store. They have the most awful lumber imagineable stored in a way that guarantees it ll warp. Stay far, far away.

- jonah

Wow. I didn’t realize Home Despot wood was so awful. So I’ll google “hardwood lumber dealer dallas” and see what that gets me. If anyone knows any other good search words or actually know of some in the north texas (dallas and fort worth) areas, please let me know.

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#12 posted 07-28-2017 12:48 AM


No, you use wood “stickers” (little strips, basically) to stack the wood so it gets consistent airflow on all six sides. That equalizes any moisture gain and greatly mitigates warping.

- jonah

Do they have to sit for a certain amount of time or more specifically until the get to a certain moisture content?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3693 days


#13 posted 07-28-2017 01:26 AM

That depends on how much moisture the wood has in it when you get it, how much moisture is in the air in your shop, and what you’re going to do with it.

Ideally you want somewhere between 6-9% moisture content, depending on the climate.

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#14 posted 07-28-2017 01:30 AM



That depends on how much moisture the wood has in it when you get it, how much moisture is in the air in your shop, and what you re going to do with it.

Ideally you want somewhere between 6-9% moisture content, depending on the climate.

- jonah

Good Lord. Why do all my hobbies end up being so expensive? This is gonna be AWESOME!!!! This is also going to be an education. Is there a woodworking basics video series you would recommend? I’m not sure if I put wood out in my back porch area that it could EVER get to 6-9% considering our sub-tropical climate.

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View Gantarris's profile

Gantarris

16 posts in 1452 days


#15 posted 07-28-2017 04:57 AM


I d recommend going to a good hardwood lumber dealer. Most will offer jointing, planing, and cutting services for relatively small fees. You ll save money and end up with much, much better lumber than any big box store. They have the most awful lumber imagineable stored in a way that guarantees it ll warp. Stay far, far away.

- jonah

Wow. I didn t realize Home Despot wood was so awful. So I ll google “hardwood lumber dealer dallas” and see what that gets me. If anyone knows any other good search words or actually know of some in the north texas (dallas and fort worth) areas, please let me know.

chris

- metroplexchl

I’ve bought some wood from both Central Hardwoods over in Carrolton and Hardwood Lumber Company off Goodnight lane in Dallas. You can also check out Woodcraft in Plano on West Plano Parkway over near 75 or one of the Rocklers in the area (one on Coit in Richardson, one on Preston in Frisco, and another just off I-30 near Beltline in Garland) though both places will be a bit more expensive than the lumber yards. You can also try Wood World over on TI boulevard, though I haven’t been there in quite a while. Hope that gives you a decent start on getting you some wood to start working on….

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3693 days


#16 posted 07-28-2017 11:37 AM

Check out Marc Spagnuolo's site. His early videos are a great intro to woodworking.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

992 posts in 3208 days


#17 posted 07-28-2017 12:05 PM

There is a good lumber yard in McKinney. I think it’s called McKinney Hardwood. I live in Memphis where there is no good source. So when I visit my son in Dallas I usually drive the truck over and pick up some lumber.

Another great source in Dallas is Craigslist. But be careful, I have had mixed results.

When I got started I bought wood from the big box stores. I had sticker shock when I started buying hardwood. But once you start you will never go back to the box stores for wood. In fact you will find the Oak and pine prices at the big box stores to be really expensive for the quality.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

421 posts in 1079 days


#18 posted 07-28-2017 01:12 PM


I m not sure if I put wood out in my back porch area that it could EVER get to 6-9% considering our sub-tropical climate.

chris

- metroplexchl

It wont – probably around 12ish
You could go lower with a kiln or with a creative indoor setup (e.g. dehumidifier, fan, heat source). One of the benefits of the kiln is the core temp of the wood be high enough to kill any bugs.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1042 days


#19 posted 07-28-2017 01:54 PM

I store mine in the rafters. This arrangement has seen temperatures from 12° to 120° F. As mentioned above … stickered and weighted is key!
 
I store cut-offs at the base of a raised platform directly beneath the “lumber loft” ...
 
BUT … depending on what I m working on at the time … I have lumber stored all over the place!

- Ron Aylor




cool set up! If it gets 120 in that shed, wouldn’t those really long boards start to bow and sag?

- metroplexchl

I haven had that problem yet … been using this set-up for about 20 years. The cherry boards, fourth from the left in the lumber loft, were not there that long … maybe four months. I used those for my William & Mary Prie Dieu ... completed last May. I do, however, have a problematic mahogany board 14” wide 6’ long … third from the left in the lumber loft. This board has a slight twist to it that seems to change direction throughout the year, depending on the temperature. According to my latest calculations this board will be completely flat again @ 3:35 PM on June 15, 2018 … LOL!

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#20 posted 07-29-2017 03:41 AM



I ve bought some wood from both Central Hardwoods over in Carrolton and Hardwood Lumber Company off Goodnight lane in Dallas. You can also check out Woodcraft in Plano on West Plano Parkway over near 75 or one of the Rocklers in the area (one on Coit in Richardson, one on Preston in Frisco, and another just off I-30 near Beltline in Garland) though both places will be a bit more expensive than the lumber yards. You can also try Wood World over on TI boulevard, though I haven t been there in quite a while. Hope that gives you a decent start on getting you some wood to start working on….

- Gantarris

thank you sir! I found what seems like a good place in McKinney up here in the ‘burbs where I live and it seems to be reasonably priced. Especially since I won’t be ordering in bulk for a long time until I become good enough to do so. He’s at Mckinney Harwood Lumber and was also very kind to answer my slew of questions. He invited me to come by his shop and talk about stuff on Sunday. I will also try those other places you recommended!

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#21 posted 07-29-2017 03:43 AM


I haven had that problem yet … been using this set-up for about 20 years. The cherry boards, fourth from the left in the lumber loft, were not there that long … maybe four months. I used those for my William & Mary Prie Dieu ... completed last May. I do, however, have a problematic mahogany board 14” wide 6 long … third from the left in the lumber loft. This board has a slight twist to it that seems to change direction throughout the year, depending on the temperature. According to my latest calculations this board will be completely flat again @ 3:35 PM on June 15, 2018 … LOL!

- Ron Aylor

Haha! I found a guy that kiln dries his wood. But wouldn’t it just gain back all that moisture if i stored kiln dried lumber outside? Or does the process of kiln drying have some sort of permanent affect?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#22 posted 07-29-2017 03:45 AM



Check out Marc Spagnuolo s site. His early videos are a great intro to woodworking.

- jonah

Perfect! thx

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View Gantarris's profile

Gantarris

16 posts in 1452 days


#23 posted 07-29-2017 04:53 AM

thank you sir! I found what seems like a good place in McKinney up here in the burbs where I live and it seems to be reasonably priced. Especially since I won t be ordering in bulk for a long time until I become good enough to do so. He s at Mckinney Harwood Lumber and was also very kind to answer my slew of questions. He invited me to come by his shop and talk about stuff on Sunday. I will also try those other places you recommended!

- metroplexchl

Completely forgot about them when I was posting last night…haven’t been by there yet, but definitely planning a visit now after looking through his price list just now….

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1042 days


#24 posted 07-30-2017 11:29 AM


I haven had that problem yet … been using this set-up for about 20 years. The cherry boards, fourth from the left in the lumber loft, were not there that long … maybe four months. I used those for my William & Mary Prie Dieu ... completed last May. I do, however, have a problematic mahogany board 14” wide 6 long … third from the left in the lumber loft. This board has a slight twist to it that seems to change direction throughout the year, depending on the temperature. According to my latest calculations this board will be completely flat again @ 3:35 PM on June 15, 2018 … LOL!

- Ron Aylor



Haha! I found a guy that kiln dries his wood. But wouldn t it just gain back all that moisture if i stored kiln dried lumber outside? Or does the process of kiln drying have some sort of permanent affect?

- metroplexchl


Well … that mahogany board was kiln dried sometime back in 1995 … it’s been rocking back and forth since then … I don’t think its kiln drying was permanent ... what do you  think?

View Rarebreed68's profile

Rarebreed68

148 posts in 695 days


#25 posted 07-30-2017 01:05 PM

I d recommend going to a good hardwood lumber dealer. Most will offer jointing, planing, and cutting services for relatively small fees. You ll save money and end up with much, much better lumber than any big box store. They have the most awful lumber imagineable stored in a way that guarantees it ll warp. Stay far, far away.

- jonah

Wow. I didn t realize Home Despot wood was so awful. So I ll google “hardwood lumber dealer dallas” and see what that gets me. If anyone knows any other good search words or actually know of some in the north texas (dallas and fort worth) areas, please let me know.

chris

- metroplexchl

If by Dallas, you mean Dallas, TX. Give Adam Tyler a call at Brazos Forrest Products. His number is 972-602-1777.
I buy all of my hardwoods from them for my cabinet shop.
They have a great selection, are able to straight line rip, and plane to slightly oversize, plus Adam is knowledgeable and helpful. They are located in Grand Prairie or Granbury (I always get the 2 confused). There are other salesmen there, but none are as helpful or reliable as Adam. Tell him Tim Thompson with Thompson’s Cabinetry sent you.
Hope this helps.

-- EARTH FIRST! We'll log the other planets later. Trust your neighbors, but brand your calves. Opinion worth price charged.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3693 days


#26 posted 07-30-2017 01:39 PM


I haven had that problem yet … been using this set-up for about 20 years. The cherry boards, fourth from the left in the lumber loft, were not there that long … maybe four months. I used those for my William & Mary Prie Dieu ... completed last May. I do, however, have a problematic mahogany board 14” wide 6 long … third from the left in the lumber loft. This board has a slight twist to it that seems to change direction throughout the year, depending on the temperature. According to my latest calculations this board will be completely flat again @ 3:35 PM on June 15, 2018 … LOL!

- Ron Aylor

Haha! I found a guy that kiln dries his wood. But wouldn t it just gain back all that moisture if i stored kiln dried lumber outside? Or does the process of kiln drying have some sort of permanent affect?

- metroplexchl


Once wood has been kiln dried, it will no longer behave like non-dried wood. It can still swell with moisture, but will never reach green wood moisture levels (~20%) again.

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

85 posts in 699 days


#27 posted 07-31-2017 12:01 AM

Excellent advice all. I’m going to be going to see the guy in McKinney this week when I can. I’ll keep y’all posted

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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