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All Replies on conduit vs bolts for pivot point for a murphy bed

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View Tom Bloom's profile

conduit vs bolts for pivot point for a murphy bed

by Tom Bloom
posted 07-24-2017 08:43 PM


3 replies so far

View DS's profile

DS

3320 posts in 2954 days


#1 posted 07-24-2017 09:04 PM

Is the conduit to act as a pivot hinge point? If so, there is a lot more to it than that (Even carriage bolts)

A basic Murphy Bed mechanism starts around $639.00 and I strongly recommend them. The hinge is counter-weighted so the bed does not “fall” out of the cabinet and has a soft landing without crushing anyone to death.

This is accomplished with a loaded spring that is precisely tensioned to balance the load of the bed.
None of that could happen with carriage bolts or conduit!

My fear is that someone, particularly a small child, could be seriously injured or killed if the weight of the bed were to fall on them.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Tom Bloom's profile

Tom Bloom

18 posts in 4461 days


#2 posted 07-24-2017 09:35 PM

Iron counter weights and retention pins are used to hold the bed in the stored position. Which I like because there are no springs to break or cylinders to start leaking down the road.

-- The cost of a thing is the amount, of what I call life, which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run.

View DS's profile

DS

3320 posts in 2954 days


#3 posted 07-24-2017 09:54 PM

It would be helpful to see such plans to better understand what you are dealing with.

The actual Murphy Bed mechanism is a tried and true, we-invented-the-industry, tens-of-thousands-of-installed-units proven design and comes with a 25 yr warranty. (And no, I don’t work for them, nor receive any compensation from them.)

I HAVE designed wall units for dozens of them and they are usually painless to work with compared to other brands, or DIY designs. I personally consider it money well spent. (One less headache)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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