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View Jackdaw's profile

What's your favorite book?

by Jackdaw
posted 07-23-2017 04:52 PM


27 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3927 days


#1 posted 07-23-2017 05:30 PM

The Rockler catalog!

View lew's profile

lew

12896 posts in 4314 days


#2 posted 07-23-2017 05:43 PM



The Rockler catalog!

- papadan


:^)

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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papadan

3584 posts in 3927 days


#3 posted 07-23-2017 05:45 PM

I really prefer pictures to words!

View mudflap4869's profile

mudflap4869

1999 posts in 2017 days


#4 posted 07-23-2017 06:44 PM

Almost anything about history, and by WEB Griffin.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2044 days


#5 posted 07-23-2017 09:43 PM

Kade Kel at the moment.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11901 posts in 3987 days


#6 posted 07-23-2017 10:28 PM

Atlas Shrugged
Love Story
Burr
Grimm Fairy Tales
The Battle Cry of Freedom
The Longest Day…Damned good movie, too.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

1028 posts in 3372 days


#7 posted 07-23-2017 11:06 PM

The Old Man and The Sea

And here is my tribute to the book: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/67152

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

1006 posts in 2192 days


#8 posted 07-23-2017 11:50 PM

Back in the 70’s, while in the service, there was plenty of time and plenty of Louis L’Amour books floating around. Every few years I get the hankering to pull some of them out and re-read them. Definitely one of my favorite authors.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12945 posts in 2938 days


#9 posted 07-24-2017 12:05 AM

Favorite is probably Dune, followed by Grapes of Wrath, also a big fan of The Good Earth. Honorable mention to just about anything by Asimov. I’ve read thousands of books, tomorrow my top three might be different based on mood or memory. :)

Also a fan of nonfiction, mostly history, crime, and craft. There was a time when I would read every science journal or text book I could get my hands on.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

692 posts in 2493 days


#10 posted 07-24-2017 01:30 AM

Avid reader growing up but had to stop once I got married/children as nothing else gets done when I start to read.

Most of my reading is now magazine based. National Geographic, CORAL, Fine Woodworking, etc…as they take no real time to read. Last books were Trout and Salmonides of North America, The Conscientious Marine Aquarist, Aquarium Corals : Selection, Husbandry, and Natural History, and Ecology of the Planted Aquarium.

I also read a lot of research articles/papers at work in support of ongoing projects, to forward to clients, and use as references in the reports I send out once my project is completed.

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TravisH

692 posts in 2493 days


#11 posted 07-24-2017 02:52 AM

Didn’t add favorite book and a tough one to narrow down to just one but probably Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

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PlanBWoodworks

168 posts in 1040 days


#12 posted 07-24-2017 03:04 AM

While I am a voracious reader, and I don’t have a particular favorite genre or author, without a doubt, To Kill a Mockingbird is my absolute favorite book of all time. In a close second, Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry.

-- Why can’t I ever find my pencil???

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

703 posts in 1299 days


#13 posted 07-24-2017 12:03 PM

Favorite books are definitely the Ender’s Quartet (Ender’s Game, Speaker for the Dead, Xenocide, and Children of the Mind) by Orson Scott Card. Oddly enough, they’re the only sci-fi I’ve ever read.

A close second would probably be a tie between Of Mice and Men, and Catcher in the Rye.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1014 posts in 1109 days


#14 posted 07-24-2017 01:22 PM

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1448 posts in 2669 days


#15 posted 07-24-2017 01:44 PM

I read in the neighbourhood of 100 books a year (hour bus ride to work and back every day) so picking a favourite is hard. Most anything by Umberto Eco is usually excellent. P.G. Wodehouse was the comic genius of the twentieth century so his books are always highly rated. I’m reading my way through the Arthurian literature right now so lots of vitae and other such things. I am just finishing the Faerie Queene by Spencer, one book left :)

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1206 days


#16 posted 07-24-2017 02:23 PM

Like JADobson, I too read 100+ books a year, so it is hard to name a favorite. Although touted as a youth novel I really enjoyed Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief. Of late I’ve been reading a lot of Lincoln Child, Graham Thomas, and Elly Griffiths. As to non-fiction I guess you could call me an eighteenth century history junkie … go figure!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2044 days


#17 posted 07-24-2017 02:43 PM



I read in the neighbourhood of 100 books a year (hour bus ride to work and back every day) so picking a favourite is hard. Most anything by Umberto Eco is usually excellent. P.G. Wodehouse was the comic genius of the twentieth century so his books are always highly rated. I m reading my way through the Arthurian literature right now so lots of vitae and other such things. I am just finishing the Faerie Queene by Spencer, one book left :)

- JADobson

In the same boat. I keep track of 30-40ish authors and they cant keep up.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6325 posts in 2769 days


#18 posted 07-24-2017 04:18 PM

I’m another voracious reader, mostly fiction. My favorite all time book, read first as a middle schooler, but re-read several times since is Watership Down by Richard Adams

Only non-fiction I’ve read in years that I felt was worth the time was Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View DS's profile

DS

3343 posts in 2979 days


#19 posted 07-24-2017 05:35 PM

There’s more than one.

The Iron Druid series by Kevin Hearne (All 8 in the series)
The Martian by Andy Wier (Better than the movie)
First Grave on the Right by Darynda Jones (plus the next 9 books in the Charley Davidson series)
Sum of All Fears by Tom Clancy (3X better than the movie – more backstory, etc)
Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon – (TV show is almost as good as the books, but they are taking way too long to make them all)

Was I only supposed to pick ONE?

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12945 posts in 2938 days


#20 posted 07-24-2017 07:38 PM

Remembered another author I really enjoy, Cormac McCarthy.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2044 days


#21 posted 07-24-2017 11:01 PM

Debt of Honor was awesome.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

162 posts in 1802 days


#22 posted 07-25-2017 02:50 AM

Thought of starting this thread a week or so ago but was not sure how it would be received, looks like there are a lot of us on here.
Ninety per cent nonfiction reader but hit a few novels. Been through almost all John Grisham’s works and have tried to do some of the classics I missed earlier.
My largest interest are the revolutionary period and WWII era. IMO. David McCullough is the best historical author, with 1776, John Adams and The Path Between the Seas, (The Creation of the Panama Canal) among his best. Stephen D. Ambrose WWII books are great as are Rick Atkinson’s works. One of the most amazing true stories of the war is Laura Hillenbrand’s Unbroken.
I hope this thread continues as I love to make sawdust during the day and talk books and reading (and read) at night, sometimes for far too late into the night.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

703 posts in 1299 days


#23 posted 07-25-2017 11:54 AM



Thought of starting this thread a week or so ago but was not sure how it would be received, looks like there are a lot of us on here.
Ninety per cent nonfiction reader but hit a few novels. Been through almost all John Grisham s works and have tried to do some of the classics I missed earlier.
My largest interest are the revolutionary period and WWII era. IMO. David McCullough is the best historical author, with 1776, John Adams and The Path Between the Seas, (The Creation of the Panama Canal) among his best. Stephen D. Ambrose WWII books are great as are Rick Atkinson s works. One of the most amazing true stories of the war is Laura Hillenbrand s Unbroken.
I hope this thread continues as I love to make sawdust during the day and talk books and reading (and read) at night, sometimes for far too late into the night.

- oldwood

Oldwood,

Have you read/what do you think of James Bradley’s stuff? I fairly enjoyed both Flags of our Fathers and Flyboys (not so much their film adaptations, though). For non-fiction regarding more recent times, I highly recommend retired Marine Captain Nathaniel Fick’s “One Bullet Away”. If you’ve read/watched Generation Kill, Captain Fick was featured in both while he was serving as a platoon commander in First Recon.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View wncguy's profile

wncguy

466 posts in 2871 days


#24 posted 07-25-2017 12:31 PM

Jackdaw – thanks for starting this thread. I always look for new authors to read.
Craig Johnson’s Longmire series were a great find for me. Suggest to anyone interested to read in order.

-- Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Dad

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

162 posts in 1802 days


#25 posted 07-26-2017 03:05 AM

Hey Dustin, did read Flags of Our Fathers and will check out Capt. Fick’s book.
A guy who really captures the South that I grew in ( a long time ago) is Rick Bragg.

fathers

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1448 posts in 2669 days


#26 posted 08-27-2017 04:13 AM

Anyone here read The Benedict Option by Rod Dreher? Pretty interesting book.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1206 days


#27 posted 08-27-2017 01:57 PM



Anyone here read The Benedict Option by Rod Dreher? Pretty interesting book.

- JADobson

Not yet, but it’s on the list. I am very familiar with Saint Benedict’s Rule and use the Benedictine Handbook for morning and evening prayer.

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