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View fivecodys's profile

Soaking Plane Parts in an Aluminum Tray?

by fivecodys
posted 07-21-2017 09:15 PM


23 replies so far

View smitdog's profile

smitdog

430 posts in 2493 days


#1 posted 07-21-2017 09:21 PM

Don’t know about a reaction between the aluminum or not but if nothing else you can definitely use a plastic bag liner. I made a shallow trough using a few 2×4s as a frame on a table top with a garbage bage laying over it to soak an entire table saw top in evaporust. Worked great and the plastic was fine after. I did use a thicker contractor bag style so I didn’t have to be as careful not to rip it and risk a mess!

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7387 posts in 2587 days


#2 posted 07-21-2017 09:24 PM

Evaporust won’t hurt the aluminium or cause any weird reactions. You could line it if you want, but that might make it more difficult to recover and reuse the evaporust once done… you can use that stuff over and over again until it just stops working, then pour it down the drain.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2233 posts in 3026 days


#3 posted 07-21-2017 09:38 PM

I don’t think it would be a problem, but a liner would prevent direct contact between the iron and al, and that seems a reasonable precaution.

I just made a trough out of corrugated cardboard, added lumps in the bottom to minimize volume and shape the trough to fit an upside-down plane, then lined it with a continuous piece of heavy (8 mil) black plastic, folded in the corners. Before using it for the lining, I held the plastic up to the sun to look for pinholes, and didn’t find any.

For smaller planes you can find plastic storage boxes (make sure they don’t have holes where lid-latches are on them) that will hold the plane and cover it with less than a gallon. I’ve used them for everything smaller than a No 6, then I had to go to the cardboard trough.

For a No 4, you might can cut the top end off a 2-liter bottle and stand the plane base on end in there – making sure it won’t tip and spill.

[more edits to add…]
We get cat litter it about 3-gallon plastic jugs. I think you could cut one side off of one of those and make a pretty good trough. Might be a little floppy.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2024 days


#4 posted 07-21-2017 09:41 PM



I don t think it would be a problem, but a liner would prevent direct contact between the iron and al, and that seems a reasonable precaution.

I just made a trough out of corrugated cardboard, added lumps in the bottom to shape the trough to fit an upside-down plane, then lined it with a continuous piece of heavy (8 mil) black plastic, folded in the corners. I held the plastic up to the sun to look for pinholes first, and didn t find any.

For smaller planes you can find plastic storage boxes (make sure they don t have holes where lid-latches are on them) that will hold the plane and cover it with less than a gallon. I ve used them for everything smaller than a No 6, then I had to go to the cardboard trough.

- Ocelot


-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2024 days


#5 posted 07-21-2017 09:45 PM

I built a cardboard trough and I have a nice piece of plastic too. I just saw this tray by the kitchen garbage can and thought hummm…..
I ordered a wallpaper trough and I think it will work perfectly but wont be here until next week. I’ve looked all over town for one and struck out.
I’m kind of anxious to get started so the old brain is working overtime to come up with a solution.

Thanks for the response.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2233 posts in 3026 days


#6 posted 07-21-2017 09:50 PM

We get cat litter it about 3-gallon plastic jugs. I think you could cut one side off of one of those and make a pretty good trough. Might be a little floppy.

Just cut it vertically, to make two halves that could be troughs – one with a cap on it (which might leak).

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7387 posts in 2587 days


#7 posted 07-21-2017 09:54 PM

Another great container for doing small stuff is an old 1 gallon paint can – the new ones are plastic. I keep one partially filled, and made a little wire basket that sits down into it. Makes it easy to dunk small parts, and you can put the top back on it when done so it doesn’t evaporate when not being used. Had mine for several years now. When the stuff stops working, you just pour it out, clean the can of any gunk, and re-fill. When not in use, it just sits on the shelf out in the garage.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2024 days


#8 posted 07-21-2017 09:59 PM

What a clever bunch of guys you are!
Very clever indeed!

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View Don W's profile

Don W

19206 posts in 2955 days


#9 posted 07-22-2017 11:59 AM

Window box liners work well. They are a couple bucks at the local Hardware store

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View JRsgarage's profile

JRsgarage

367 posts in 897 days


#10 posted 07-22-2017 12:18 PM

Jay Bates suggested a 4” pvc with end cap to get efficient use and coverage, which i thought was a great idea. i used to soak small parts in a film negative tray

-- “Facts don't care about your feelings.” ..., Ben Shapiro

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1874 days


#11 posted 07-22-2017 01:15 PM

I pinned together troughs out of scrap ply and lined it in plastic. I’d fill it and fold it over and blue tape it to prevent evaporation and also so I could shake it every now and again.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3812 posts in 2349 days


#12 posted 07-22-2017 02:03 PM



I pinned together troughs out of scrap ply and lined it in plastic. I d fill it and fold it over and blue tape it to prevent evaporation and also so I could shake it every now and again.

- TheFridge

I did that too, but used the thin plastic sheeting. Must have nicked it because it all drained out. Next time I’ll use the thick stuff. I looked for a window box liner, but couldn’t find any without holes. I suppose I could have just caulked them.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2024 days


#13 posted 07-22-2017 05:20 PM

Well I had to make due with what I could find. I made a trough from a heavy duty cardboard box and lined it with plastic. I had to use rocks to bring the fluid level up and I still am a bit shy. I even shimmed the box up on one side to make the fluid deeper!

For the smaller parts I used a to-go box from a local restaurant.

I’m using the soak time to install my new MJ Steel Pro splitter.

This is a fun Saturday!

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1299 posts in 3278 days


#14 posted 07-22-2017 06:25 PM

I found wall paper trays made of heavy plastic and no holes.
about 2 ft. of inside clearance. about $5.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View Don W's profile

Don W

19206 posts in 2955 days


#15 posted 07-22-2017 11:08 PM

If it’s evapo-rust, you can add water to bring the level up. Whatever you do, make sure the parts are completely submerged or you’ll have an etch line

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2233 posts in 3026 days


#16 posted 07-24-2017 06:02 PM

I’m glad you finally got into it!

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2024 days


#17 posted 07-24-2017 06:35 PM



I m glad you finally got into it!

- Ocelot

The Evaporust worked real well. I got most of it back in the jug. :)
I have buffed most of the parts out and they look pretty good.
The lever cap doesn’t look like it will ever be or ever was shiny but it’s free of rust.
I’m now working on the the bed and sanding the tote and knob. Both were in pretty rough condition.
I haven’t decided if I will take the bed/cheeks of the plane to a high shine or just a 400 grit shine. The japanning is in fair condition and I plan to just leave it as is.
It’s so stinking hot here that I may not get back to it for a week or so.
I still need to come up with a method of flattening the sole. I have seen several on You Tube but not sure which one I will use yet.

Thank for all of your advice. It has been very helpful.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2233 posts in 3026 days


#18 posted 07-24-2017 07:00 PM

Before you flatten the sole, sharpen up the blade and see how it planes. If it planes well, you don’t need to flatten it.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2024 days


#19 posted 07-24-2017 07:50 PM



Before you flatten the sole, sharpen up the blade and see how it planes. If it planes well, you don t need to flatten it.

- Ocelot

Oh! That’s a good idea. Thanks!

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View Don W's profile

Don W

19206 posts in 2955 days


#20 posted 07-24-2017 07:56 PM


Before you flatten the sole, sharpen up the blade and see how it planes. If it planes well, you don t need to flatten it.

- Ocelot

Oh! That s a good idea. Thanks!

- fivecodys

Yep, if it’s not broke, don’t fix it. :-)

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3687 days


#21 posted 07-24-2017 08:11 PM

Every plane up to and including a #8 will fit in a length of 4” PVC pipe with an end cap glued on. That’s how I de-rusted my #7 and #8. You only need a gallon and a quarter, I think, with just a #8 in there. If you put a bunch of small bolts or something in to displace the liquid, you could get away with a gallon.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14358 posts in 4485 days


#22 posted 07-24-2017 08:17 PM



We get cat litter it about 3-gallon plastic jugs. I think you could cut one side off of one of those and make a pretty good trough. Might be a little floppy.

Just cut it vertically, to make two halves that could be troughs – one with a cap on it (which might leak).

- Ocelot

Great idea

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2024 days


#23 posted 07-24-2017 08:18 PM



Every plane up to and including a #8 will fit in a length of 4” PVC pipe with an end cap glued on. That s how I de-rusted my #7 and #8. You only need a gallon and a quarter, I think, with just a #8 in there. If you put a bunch of small bolts or something in to displace the liquid, you could get away with a gallon.

- jonah

I think I remember watching Jay Bates use this method. It sounds like a good idea. Thanks!

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

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