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Made in America

by JCamp
posted 07-20-2017 11:45 AM


49 replies so far

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#1 posted 07-20-2017 11:48 AM

Also you can go to Amazon and search “Made in America” and they will bring up a lot of products that are still made here. The prices are not to bad compared to the “Knock offs”

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#2 posted 07-20-2017 11:55 AM

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hairy

2788 posts in 3833 days


#3 posted 07-20-2017 12:14 PM

Robust lathes, Incra, Woodpecker, Whiteside

-- My reality check bounced...

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#4 posted 07-20-2017 12:20 PM

Free Eagles / Grace USA screwdrivers

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#5 posted 07-20-2017 12:25 PM

Channellock

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#6 posted 07-20-2017 12:30 PM

Flexcut draw knives

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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Runner

81 posts in 1074 days


#7 posted 07-20-2017 12:48 PM

Oneida Air Systems. I recently ordered their Mini Gorilla. Being Made in America was definitely a factor in my purchasing decision.

-- Kjell - Eau Claire WI

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GR8HUNTER

5699 posts in 1013 days


#8 posted 07-20-2017 01:41 PM

some is made in America ….with foreign junk parts …you have to watch for that….....:<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Carloz

1147 posts in 892 days


#9 posted 07-20-2017 03:22 PM

As you can see from your own post it requires much efforts to compile a list of mere a handful of american companies.
You can bash China all you want but the truth is they pull almost any manufacturing job from the US ( or better to say we pushed all manufacturing jobs there ourselves)

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mramseyISU

572 posts in 1846 days


#10 posted 07-20-2017 04:00 PM

You don’t understand how supply chains work do you.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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Gene Howe

11327 posts in 3729 days


#11 posted 07-20-2017 04:01 PM



As you can see from your own post it requires much efforts to compile a list of mere a handful of american companies.
You can bash China all you want but the truth is they pull almost any manufacturing job from the US ( or better to say we pushed all manufacturing jobs there ourselves)

- Carloz

Well said.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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magaoitin

247 posts in 1250 days


#12 posted 07-20-2017 04:08 PM

I am leary of Amazon’s labeling and search system. Anyone with a storefront can say their products are made in America and there is no oversight by Amazon.

After 30 years in the construction industry, mainly working on Government projects, the validity of the Made in America stickers with any manufactured product is doubtful to me.

I have had to deal with the “Buy American Act” and the “Buy America” standard more and more over the past 15 years. With our current trade agreements, 49% of a finished product can come from overseas and still qualify as a domestic , Made in America product.

A few years ago on a Navy DoD project, I purchased (2) $3.5M generators from Caterpillar that had to be Made in America, per the Buy American Act.

After they were delivered to the jobsite, during inspection we found a number of stickers with Made in China on components, but both generators were accepted as Domestic products, made in America, even though the controls, wiring, and panel boards were definitely not American. Since over 50% of the value of the equipment was made and assembled in America it was acceptable.

-- Jeff ~ Tacoma Wa.

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DrDirt

4529 posts in 4043 days


#13 posted 07-20-2017 05:05 PM

People shop at Dollar General and Harbor Freight… yet all say we need a 15 dollar minimum wage… when they won’t pay for products produced here now.

to me WORSE… is We as a society happily pay for child labor and get our Nike shoes from Bangladesh. In fiscal year 2014, NIKE was supplied by ~430 apparel factories operating in 41 countries. China, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and Malaysia accounted for most of the apparel production.

We buy 150 dollar Air Jordan sneakers, that they pay a 9 year old 12 cents an hour to make.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#14 posted 07-20-2017 05:39 PM

I’m not meaning to slap anyone’s hands but I was hoping this would be a forum where we could share info on what tools are made here in America, what there quality is and if they are good deals. There are other forums where the topic of overseas production has been discussed.
Can’t speak for anyone else but as an American worker I should put forth a little more effort to support my home team. Who knows maybe another LJ will benefit from that decision.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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Fred Hargis

5381 posts in 2794 days


#15 posted 07-20-2017 05:51 PM

I can guarantee you if I had Bill Gates money, my shop would be full of Northfield power tools.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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AlaskaGuy

5128 posts in 2610 days


#16 posted 07-20-2017 05:59 PM


You don t understand how supply chains work do you.

- mramseyISU

If you’d use the quote feature I’d know who you are addressing. Until then how do I trust and engineer. :)

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#17 posted 07-20-2017 06:16 PM

These guys make some good stuff. I actually dont own any but have looked at them in the stores.

http://www.vaughanmfg.com/

If I had Bill gates money I’d have every Henry lever action rifle and all the Leather handled Estwings. I’d love to find a stacked leather handled ball peen hammer but I aint had any luck finding one yet

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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mramseyISU

572 posts in 1846 days


#18 posted 07-20-2017 06:53 PM


You don t understand how supply chains work do you.

- mramseyISU
If you d use the quote feature I d know who you are addressing. Until then how do I trust and engineer. :)

- AlaskaGuy

It was in response to everybody who had commented up to that point and from what I can tell everybody who has commented since then.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2296 days


#19 posted 07-20-2017 08:49 PM

Lie Nielsen

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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ArtMann

1324 posts in 1117 days


#20 posted 07-20-2017 09:29 PM

It is a fact that wages in other parts of the world have drastically reduced the value of labor in the USA. As a nation, we can deal with that by advancing our technology to maintain average wealth. Unfortunately, that does nothing to help the unemployed unskilled laborer who is competing against people from China to build the same products.

Those who speak of bad working conditions at factories in foreign countries should realize that the alternative to these jobs is not better jobs. It is unemployment and eventual starvation. Is that better?

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JADobson

1377 posts in 2412 days


#21 posted 07-20-2017 09:37 PM


Those who speak of bad working conditions at factories in foreign countries should realize that the alternative to these jobs is not better jobs. It is unemployment and eventual starvation. Is that better?

- ArtMann

It is not really an either/or option here. People survived before these factory jobs appeared and they will continue to survive when they are gone. Using this argument to justify taking advantage of (not accusing you personally, but more widely as North Americans) the underdeveloped world is tragic, short sighted and (for a nation that states to be under God) un-Christian.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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BenjaminNY

135 posts in 1703 days


#22 posted 07-20-2017 09:58 PM

http://vegawoodworking.com

Vega woodworking. I’m gonna buy their edge sander eventually.

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ArtMann

1324 posts in 1117 days


#23 posted 07-21-2017 03:46 AM

I think the “survival” you are talking about is much, much worse than having a difficult and low paying job. The evidence of that is they voluntarily continue their employment under these harsh conditions. These countries are no longer mostly agrarian and the option to go back to the land to survive may not be there at all. A ban on imports from China to the US would almost certainly result in a precipitous drop in the standard of living there and a fair amount of starvation. Is that the Christian thing to do?

Those who speak of bad working conditions at factories in foreign countries should realize that the alternative to these jobs is not better jobs. It is unemployment and eventual starvation. Is that better?

- ArtMann

It is not really an either/or option here. People survived before these factory jobs appeared and they will continue to survive when they are gone. Using this argument to justify taking advantage of (not accusing you personally, but more widely as North Americans) the underdeveloped world is tragic, short sighted and (for a nation that states to be under God) un-Christian.

- JADobson


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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#24 posted 07-21-2017 10:55 AM

ArtMann – I’m not sure ruining our country will benefit their country in the long run either…

Anyway back to the topic:

http://www.usalovelist.com/list/

That is a pretty good list. I didn’t realize Titebond was made in the USA an my home state of OHIO too. Bowtech archery is made in the USA and Hi Point firearms are made in Ohio as well (with a lifetime warranty too).
Also I believe Martin and Gibson guitars are made here too

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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DrDirt

4529 posts in 4043 days


#25 posted 07-21-2017 01:33 PM

Somewhere a couple years ago there was a guy that was building homes, with onlyl USA materials… they had a list of US suppliers – which included of course, fasteners, glues and hardware.

http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2012-12-27/business/os-usa-built-house-20121227_1_products-carr-legal-workers
Carr, who used his cellphone camera to document where products had been manufactured, estimated that the additional cost of wrapping the house in a virtual American flag was about $2,500 to $3,000, or about 1 percent of the overall cost of construction. Two of the project’s seemingly least-expensive items — screws and nails — were responsible for driving much of that higher tab, because they cost about four times as much as their foreign-made versions.

This article has the list of suppliers with the hyperlinks to the companies… so lots of plumbing and such as well.
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/business/2011/10/how-to-build-a-made-in-america-home/

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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PPK

1316 posts in 1110 days


#26 posted 07-21-2017 01:57 PM

Gramercy tools. Quincy air compressors. Klein tools (electrical tools, mostly).

It’s kind of hard to think of any tools that are truly manufactured in the US. I can’t think of any that compare to Makita, Dewalt, etc.

-- Pete

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pontic

674 posts in 909 days


#27 posted 07-21-2017 02:56 PM

Fender professional series guitars Gibson guitars, ESP guitars.
Starret measuring tools.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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AZWoody

1425 posts in 1525 days


#28 posted 07-21-2017 03:20 PM



Fender professional series guitars Gibson guitars, ESP guitars.
Starret measuring tools.

- pontic

I don’t know if I would consider those Made in the USA companies when the majority of their guitars are foreign made and they have a couple premium lines that are made here.

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AZWoody

1425 posts in 1525 days


#29 posted 07-21-2017 03:28 PM

Woodmaster tools and Timberking Sawmills.
Both made by the same company. Looking at my sawmill I think 99% of the components on there that I’ve seen, including the hydraulic hoses all say Made in the USA. I think the only thing I saw that wasn’t was an electrical sensor component for the setworks setup.

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Holbs

2176 posts in 2330 days


#30 posted 07-21-2017 10:54 PM

http://eze-lap.com/ diamond sharpening stones. I know they are made in America (where do they get the diamonds? that I am unsure of). But each plate is made in Carson City, NV for I’ve seen the manufacture rooms.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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Aj2

2062 posts in 2099 days


#31 posted 07-22-2017 05:47 AM

Has this been mentioned yet.http://www.deulentools.com/BuySharpeners.html
I almost bought one once.They are nicely made true Merican craftsmanship.

-- Aj

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becikeja

973 posts in 3114 days


#32 posted 07-22-2017 12:48 PM

Tough topic, I truly do everything I can to buy “American Made” but many times it is just not possible. If we all stand up as a society and stop buying foreign product we can reverse the trend, but we need to stick together. Now here is the issue. Many of us are employed by these non-American companies. If people stop buying my goods I will not have the cash to buy American made goods.

When I started my career I worked for a US company that primarily made everything in America. They were then purchased by a French company and over the last 20 years moved production to Thailand, India, Mexico and China. Sad to say I was actually a part of the transition team. They still claim American Made on many products, but the fact is they assemble parts in America with minimum American content in order to legally apply the label. Sad. About 5 years ago I switched companies in the same industry, and now work for a Swiss company. This company has little presence in the US today, but I am proud to say that they are investing in America. Last year my division opened our first ever US based manufacturing location employing 300 people. Currently it mainly assembles foreign sub-components, but the 5 year plan is full manufacturing from US suppliers. Although we are not fully Made in America now, it feels good to be a part of the future “Made in America” solution.

Thanks for starting this thread, it helps me identify who to watch and try to buy from.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#33 posted 07-24-2017 01:40 PM

That sounds like a interesting career Beci. I know the American work force requires higher pay That’s y I think the companies that stick it out here should get some tax breaks and also that imports should get a tax hike. Kind of an incintive to keep and create jobs here at home.
Also if I’m remembering right Mattews bows are USA made I’m gearing up for fall so I have foodplots and archery on my mind. Lol

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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JCamp

934 posts in 851 days


#34 posted 07-24-2017 01:44 PM

Here is another localish American made company.

https://www.buckeyecameras.com/about-us.html

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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dad2jj82

41 posts in 1916 days


#35 posted 07-24-2017 04:18 PM

I had this conversation with my wife today. I seen a sticker section1176. I look it up and it’s a clothing line that is made in USA. The price for a t-shirt was close to 40.00 that said section1776. Nothing fancy. I do not believe that in today’s technology that it cost almost twice as much to make a pretty basic t-shirt. I am a dues paying union member who has votes as conservative as I can locally all the way up. I do factor in made in USA when buying something and am willing to pay more for it, however like that shirt company in my opinion I am being taken advantage of for profit because someone says made in USA. I feel as companies jack up prices even more for the made in USA label. No proof just how I feel.

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Greg

333 posts in 3174 days


#36 posted 07-24-2017 05:12 PM

Here’s an interesting twist on the direction of your post Jcamp. I am a custom fly fishing net builder in California (Barely the USA LOL) and have seen first hand the dumping of Chinese-made nets on our markets. These are horrific excuses for woodworking and are available at your local big box outdoor retailer for about 20-30 bucks. Interestingly, if I were to buy JUST THE IMPORTED PLASTIC NET BAG from a local fly fishing store, I would pay approximately the same $ amount as the WHOLE imported net! See anything wrong with that scenario!? By the way, some of the imported nets look like the worker simply threw the two net faces on a large 80grit belt sander at a 45 degree angle (to its length) and then squirt on a single coat of drippy finish and called it good. Dispicable IMO. So, yeah, Sierra Nets are built in the USA! I also help keep two other U.S. citizens busy with their respective work – A leather artist in Northern Cal, and a fellow veteran in Connecticut who makes my paracord lanyards.

-- You don't have a custom made heirloom fly fishing Net? http://www.Sierra-Nets.com

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Jim55

177 posts in 2367 days


#37 posted 07-24-2017 06:23 PM

It’s not limited to where a thing is made. Some consideration of the final destination of the money spent has to be considered too. A (very brief) tale of two trucks…
Once, some years ago, I was driving around taking care of business. I saw two different p/u-trucks- One, a “Toyota” I think it was, “made in the USA.” The other? “Imported exclusively for Dodge.”

Another thing is where’s the root of the evil? Unions striking till companies are forced to close their doors. Politicians buying votes with ridiculous minimum wages, government over taxing business owners to punish them for making a profit, burying companies in endless and often contradictory regulations so that it is nearly impossible too and certainly not worth doing business here when you can simply pay China, et al to make your products for a greater profit w/out all the hassle.

The bottom line is that business exists for one reason and one reason only- to make profit, and that is NOT an evil thing.
But as long as this country and it’s various tiers of grasping politicians remain hostile to business owners, it will remain a graveyard of rusting closed factories and office buildings.

I do not suggest there be no regulation, but we have waayyy too much nowand we all know it.

That’s it, soap box for rent.

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Dwain

587 posts in 4160 days


#38 posted 07-24-2017 06:58 PM

I will pick up where Jim55 left off…

It is ridiculous to imply that the rusting factories in places like Cleveland, Buffalo and Pittsburgh is entirely the fault of grasping politicians. Did politicians knock down Chrysler, Ford and GM in the late 70’s? Of course not. The auto industry didn’t understand what the buyer wanted, and Honda and Toyota did. Simple as that. Now, I am not saying that unions and politicians don’t have something to do with our current situation with American made products, they certainly do, but please don’t blame it on the politicians exclusively. There is plenty to blame them for, this isn’t on them… exclusively.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

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PPK

1316 posts in 1110 days


#39 posted 09-22-2017 07:55 PM

Drill Hog. (for drill bits)

-- Pete

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Mainiac Matt

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#40 posted 09-22-2017 09:02 PM

Globalization sucks! MAGA

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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Jack Lewis

400 posts in 1379 days


#41 posted 09-22-2017 09:15 PM


Robust lathes, Incra, Woodpecker, Whiteside

- hairy


Serious tools, Simple Tools
And I only turn USA wood! When I can get it

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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Woodknack

12649 posts in 2681 days


#42 posted 09-22-2017 09:20 PM

It saddens me, seriously, that there are Americans who attack anyone promoting American made goods. If we can’t come together and agree about something so obviously beneficial to ourselves then what can we agree about?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Fresch

407 posts in 2222 days


#43 posted 09-23-2017 12:14 AM

Shopsmith

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bandit571

22415 posts in 2984 days


#44 posted 09-23-2017 12:58 AM

Around here? Honda. Marysville Automotive Plant, East Liberty Plant. Anna Engine Plant, Honda Transmission Plant in Russels Point, OH. been here since the 80s….15,000+ jobs

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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oldnovice

7447 posts in 3669 days


#45 posted 09-23-2017 05:26 AM

Does anyone remember the really cheap transistor radios from Japan in the late ‘50’’s and early ‘60’s? At that time they actually were just one notch above junk. That was then now no one can really argue the the quality of Japanese products rate among the best in everything from electronics to automobiles. Today the components in Japanese products are not all made in Japan but the Japanese companies dictate the level of quality and therfore produce top level products. The same can be said for South Korean products as they are definitely inching up to the quality that computers expect and can compete with other global companies.

This scenario will continue with companies in countries all over the world and there is nothing, short of war, that can stop it.

If the consumers demand quality, the companies that produce high quality products, regardless of country, will earn the loyalty of the comsumer.

In other words, we control the quality of the products by what we buy and by what we reject!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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BurlyBob

6090 posts in 2566 days


#46 posted 09-23-2017 06:01 AM

Hans dear friend you are so very right!!!

I try if at all possible to buy the best Made in the USA!! But that’s my personal choice. However it’s the best is not Made in the USA I buy the best I can afford. I’ve found over my lifetime buying the best will last me far longer than buying the cheapest. I met a wood carver in Germany a few years ago whose thinking pretty much matched mine.
“Buy a cheap tool, you buy it many times. Buy the best tool it lasts you a lifetime.” Do the math!!

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Clarkie

472 posts in 2142 days


#47 posted 09-23-2017 10:26 AM

Hello JCamp, good subject though it may get lost in the conversation. The only American made tools I own are the old ones purchased from wood worker’s or their wives. From collections left behind or from auctions of the deceased woodworker. Funny, but I find the one way to judge a well built tool is by it’s lasting through the years of work performed by the user. There are reputable tool makers, but mainly way out of reach for the young guy or gal coming along now. I have a couple Lie-N planes, but it took years before I could actually afford them, both are block planes and both cost over a hundred a piece.
The younger people look at how a thing looks and not how it performs or how long it will last. I think appreciation comes along with maturity. The old saying, “youth is wasted on the young” really holds weight. Don’t get me wrong, I have worked beside and have known many a young artisan, but they seem to be farther and farther apart now.
There is another thing that throws a person off, they put “Assembled in America” on goods and people mistake that for being Made in America. The small print below Assembled reads, manufactured in Mexico or China or etc. Well, that’s all I have to say for now, thanks for opening the subject up. Have fun, make some dust.

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MrRon

5364 posts in 3544 days


#48 posted 09-24-2017 02:44 AM

When I was your age (1964), Almost everything was made in America. I knew quality and could see over the years; as cost went up, quality went down. Companies that tried to keep the quality lost business to businesses that went offshore. They tried to maintain quality, but had to raise their price to stay in business. Competition finally won and the made-in-America companies joined those overseas bringing shoddy goods back home. The few made-in-America holdouts are now a niche group. They cater to a certain group of people who demand the best, regardless of cost. They are few and disappearing every day. Someone here mentioned Starrett as being American made. That is only partially true. Many of their tools are made in places like, Ireland, England, China, Brazil and Scotland. Precision tools tend to be a niche item due to the nature of a precision tool. They normally cost a lot of money and are used by people that require demanding precision. Precision tool makers in Japan, Switzerland and Germany now provide most of the precision tools used throughout the world, so Starrett in order to stay in business has to have their tools made overseas. Their prices are among the highest in the industry and their quality is faltering. It won’t be long before they are just history. There will always be a market for quality tools and everything else, but it probably won’t come from our factories. Times change, time marches on. Who knows what tomorrow holds?

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Dakkar

353 posts in 2228 days


#49 posted 10-09-2017 12:38 AM

The oldest tool I’ve got is my trusty Estwing solid steel hammer. I bought it back in the late ‘70s after getting tired of breaking wooden hammer handles and it still nails as well today as the day I bought it. I no longer use it every day, but at least a few times a week.

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