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All Replies on When does our hobby shop need a contractor liscense?

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View WhiskeyCreek's profile

When does our hobby shop need a contractor liscense?

by WhiskeyCreek
posted 07-19-2017 06:42 PM


1 2 next »
76 replies

76 replies so far

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1128 days


#1 posted 07-19-2017 06:57 PM

Countersue her for the material.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

502 posts in 1615 days


#2 posted 07-19-2017 07:05 PM

Promote yourself as an artisan with whom she contracted for the work. They do not require licenses because there is no government control on “Freedom of Speech” which all artisan can work under. You contracted for labor and materials which she agreed to?

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#3 posted 07-19-2017 07:07 PM

A lot will depend on you State and City laws/ordinances. If you made a contract with someone your are contracting. You better seek the advice of a layer in you area who know the laws where you live. Where I live I believe I’d be in deep do do.

Is this in writing?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1126 days


#4 posted 07-19-2017 07:11 PM

You need to check your local regulations. I would imagine CA is fussier than some regarding the requirement for being licensed and insured. It also depends on what you’re doing. I build doors, but I don’t install them. I leave it up to the buyer to have their contractor do the work. Plus, if he screws it up, it’s not my problem.

View WhiskeyCreek's profile

WhiskeyCreek

17 posts in 1690 days


#5 posted 07-19-2017 07:12 PM

I have council. It is in writing, but as far as the contract she signed; she is in the wrong. That is only as the contract reads. I don’t understand when it is necessary or do most of us just slide by without being noticed. There are major woodworkers here in California that don’t have any license and never have a problem. I like the artisan idea. It seems the line is if your promoting yourself for profit. Which yes I get paid for my work, but not a lot and my main focus is school. I could never live off of my woodwork. I am just trying to be prepared for a solid answer.

-- Whiskey Creek Woodmill & Co.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8785 posts in 3114 days


#6 posted 07-19-2017 07:44 PM

What exactly are you doing for this client?

Are you making something for her and she takes it home? Or, are you installing something at her house or office?

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2968 posts in 2512 days


#7 posted 07-19-2017 08:04 PM

If someone buys a car from you and you write up a contract, do you need to be a contractor? I don’t think so.
If you do work in someone’s house or commercial jobsite, and write a contract, then you will need a license.

-- Paul, Duvall, WA

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1436 days


#8 posted 07-19-2017 08:35 PM

I’m no lawyer, but here, if you attach anything to a wall you need to have a contractors license.

Regardless of whether you have the license or not, she contractually agreed to have you do said work for said amount.

I think she could probably get out of the contract,
but I doubt that she could get away without paying you for work performed.
As far as money you have spent on material, not really sure.
A lot will depend on the contract you wrote up that she signed, and how much of it is enforceable by law.

Again, not a lawyer, but I would think if you were contracting without a license that would be more of a problem with the contractors board than the client.
I’m sure your work would have had to be done to contractors laws/standards.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#9 posted 07-19-2017 08:37 PM


What exactly are you doing for this client?

Are you making something for her and she takes it home? Or, are you installing something at her house or office?

- waho6o9

That would be good information for us to know since your asking our advise.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View DS's profile

DS

3324 posts in 2957 days


#10 posted 07-19-2017 09:37 PM

Contracting w/o a license is a Misdemeanor in Phoenix.

What she did reminds me of how some unscrupulous contractors hire undocumented workers and then call INS at the end of the day to avoid paying for the labor.

If indeed you need a license for the work you did, she could possibly argue that no legal contract existed since such contracting would be illegal under your local statutes.

I’m no lawyer, so this is not legal advice.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Jon Hobbs's profile

Jon Hobbs

147 posts in 1241 days


#11 posted 07-19-2017 09:38 PM

Typically, a license is an agreement between a tradesman and a government agency. They’re usually intended to ensure the tradesman complies with all applicable laws and building codes. And to provide a measure of protection for consumers/clients.

Typically, clients are not required by law to use licensed tradesmen. There are benefits to hiring licensed workers and there are risks to contracting unlicensed workers (and vice versa). Usually, the law leaves it up to the consumer to decide what benefits and risks they’re willing to take on. Consumers are free to enter into contracts with unlicensed tradesmen and unlicensed tradesmen are free to enter into contracts with consumers.

A contract between a tradesman and a client is a different animal. It lays out what each party is agreeing to provide. The tradesman provides labor and materials to be delivered on a schedule. The client provides money, perhaps also on a schedule.

Unless your contract with the client stipulated that you had to be licensed, then there should be no connection, no relationship between your contact with the client and your licensed/unlicensed status.

However, it can depend on the nature of your work as well. If you’re rewiring her house, or redoing the plumbing, for pay, then the law may require you to have an appropriate license. If you’re planting flowers in her garden, or building her a bookcase, then the law most likely would not require you to be licensed.

As others have stated, things can be different from state to state, county to county, or even city to city, so local legal expertise should be your best source of information.

-- Jon -- Just a Minnesota kid hanging out in Kansas

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

926 posts in 2121 days


#12 posted 07-19-2017 09:46 PM

I think “thousands of dollars worth of copper” sounds like you are doing a larger job.
Tell us about the scope of work you undertook for her. That will allow readers here to give you better input.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Hermit's profile

Hermit

237 posts in 1862 days


#13 posted 07-19-2017 10:00 PM

California law requires that anything over $500.00 in labor and materials (combined), requires a contractor license. You can’t bid on anything over that amount unless you are licensed by the state of California to perform such work.

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4185 days


#14 posted 07-19-2017 10:00 PM

You don’t have to be a contractor to build
custom furniture.

I think you should be optimistic about things
because I don’t see how she has a case and
if she actually does drag you into court, she’ll
probably lose and in any case judgments are
difficult to collect.

That said, I would try once more to reason
with her, in writing, and offer to sell her
the material. She backed out for her own
reasons, and now she wants you to take
the loss.

You could also recycle the copper and offer
to pay her what you get for it. It’s unfortunately
a lose-lose scenario. Usually with industrial
materials a substantial restocking fee is
charged when materials are returned. Retail
consumers aren’t familiar with this business
practice.

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 3402 days


#15 posted 07-19-2017 10:20 PM

Depends entirely on what you are doing, if you are building furniture you don’t need to be a contractor. If you are remodeling her bathroom then you probably do need to be a contractor.

Deposits should always cover the cost of the materials so you don’t get stiffed.

I think you should be worried because even if you are right, she can cost you money with court costs, lawyer fees etc.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#16 posted 07-19-2017 10:26 PM


You don t have to be a contractor to build
custom furniture.

I think you should be optimistic about things
because I don t see how she has a case and
if she actually does drag you into court, she ll
probably lose and in any case judgments are
difficult to collect.

That said, I would try once more to reason
with her, in writing, and offer to sell her
the material. She backed out for her own
reasons, and now she wants you to take
the loss.

You could also recycle the copper and offer
to pay her what you get for it. It s unfortunately
a lose-lose scenario. Usually with industrial
materials a substantial restocking fee is
charged when materials are returned. Retail
consumers aren t familiar with this business
practice.

- Loren


Well there a lot of advice being given and we don’t even know the scope of the work he’d doing. He seem reluctant to say. He says he has counsel so I don’t know why he’s asking a bunch of non lawyers these question.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1312 days


#17 posted 07-19-2017 10:39 PM

He’s probably setting up her grow-house…

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1342 posts in 1445 days


#18 posted 07-19-2017 10:49 PM

Send her a flak jacket with a dead fish in it. That’ll get her attention!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1342 posts in 1445 days


#19 posted 07-19-2017 10:57 PM



I am in school and do not promote myself as a contractor, but do require my clients to sign a contract for the protection of both of us.

- WhiskeyCreek

The artisan angle may work. Not sure about the rules in California. It may be a stretch to say that you don’t promote yourself as a contractor based on the website that promotes your work.

Your stuff looks beautiful, by the way. It’s a shame that there are some people/clients that insist on acting like a-holes.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2946 days


#20 posted 07-19-2017 11:18 PM

This is why I refuse to do work for anyone but me. It only takes one to make your PT make some money gig to go sideways. Sucks but in our current state of sue happy idiots this is what happens. Get a lawyerm, refuse to speak to her and let them deal with it. Drag it out forever.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2839 posts in 2833 days


#21 posted 07-19-2017 11:31 PM

I don’t see how building custom furniture requires a contractor license. Plumbing or remodeling or electrical work yes. I think if you produce a contract that she signed you would be on the winning side of this argument.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

487 posts in 1496 days


#22 posted 07-19-2017 11:36 PM


I don t see how building custom furniture requires a contractor license. Plumbing or remodeling or electrical work yes. I think if you produce a contract that she signed you would be on the winning side of this argument.

- dhazelton

Furniture doesn’t attach to anything. No license required. The work he’s doing hasn’t been specified…

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

808 posts in 3038 days


#23 posted 07-20-2017 12:31 AM


It is in writing, but as far as the contract she signed; she is in the wrong. That is only as the contract reads.

- WhiskeyCreek

I’m not in the US, so I can only comment on what I would suggest are general principles that I would think are similar.

I was taught “Offer + Acceptance = Contract”. Generally, you are the one who makes the offer, with your terms attached, and she accepts the offer. There are sometimes situations where the offer is not legally valid, but they are not common. Failure to do due diligence is generally not one of them, though deliberate misrepresentation could be.

Once you have a contract, the next thing I was taught comes into play – RTFC (Read the … Contract). When you have a written contract, nothing applies except what “the contract reads”. Prior verbal conversations etc. count for nothing.

A contract creates rights and obligations. She has the right to receive the goods, you have the obligation to deliver them. You have the right to be paid, she has the obligation to pay. There may be others, but these are the main ones.

It is when something comes up that is not covered by the contract that you have a problem. What that basically tells you is that your written contract, and the process you follow to enter into contracts, might need improvement. When this experience is over, sit back and think carefully about what you could have done up front to prevent it from happening, then do that in future.

The final thing that I was taught is that “when lawyers get involved, the only people who win are the lawyers.” It is the best interests of both you and your client to resolve this without involving lawyers. Even if it costs you money, it is just the price of the lessons it teaches you.

As I said, these are general principles from outside the US. Hopefully they are helpful. but feel free to ignore if not.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6622 posts in 2802 days


#24 posted 07-20-2017 12:31 AM

Ditto to what woodbutcher said!!

View BustedClock's profile

BustedClock

129 posts in 3059 days


#25 posted 07-20-2017 01:26 AM

FWIW, I believe lawyers aren’t allowed in small claims court in California. Because the parties are representing themselves, small claims judges typically grant a little slack to both sides with respect to rules of evidence, procedure, etc.

Nevertheless, your lawyer should be advising you both on the case, and on how to make the best presentation. If he/she isn’t, maybe you need to think about your choice of lawyers.

-- Hey, I'm usually right twice a day! Except where they use 24 hour clocks.

View BustedClock's profile

BustedClock

129 posts in 3059 days


#26 posted 07-20-2017 01:31 AM


It is in writing, but as far as the contract she signed; she is in the wrong. That is only as the contract reads.

- WhiskeyCreek

<snip>

I was taught “Offer + Acceptance = Contract”. Generally, you are the one who makes the offer, with your terms attached, and she accepts the offer. There are sometimes situations where the offer is not legally valid, but they are not common. Failure to do due diligence is generally not one of them, though deliberate misrepresentation could be.

<snip>

A contract creates rights and obligations.

<snip>

Hey Tootles, would you happen to be resident in the UK? I ask simply because your post sounds exactly like what I learned about Common Law in my Contracts class. Most states in the US seem to have added a lot of bling to the common law, but at heart, all these contracts share the principles you describe.

-- Hey, I'm usually right twice a day! Except where they use 24 hour clocks.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#27 posted 07-20-2017 01:35 AM


It is in writing, but as far as the contract she signed; she is in the wrong. That is only as the contract reads.

- WhiskeyCreek

I was taught “Offer + Acceptance = Contract”. Generally, you are the one who makes the offer, with your terms attached, and she accepts the offer. There are sometimes situations where the offer is not legally valid, but they are not common. Failure to do due diligence is generally not one of them, though deliberate misrepresentation could be.

A contract creates rights and obligations.

Hey Tootles, would you happen to be resident in the UK? I ask simply because your post sounds exactly like what I learned about Common Law in my Contracts class. Most states in the US seem to have added a lot of bling to the common law, but at heart, all these contracts share the principles you describe.

- BustedClock


His profile with tell you he’s not in the UK

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

808 posts in 3038 days


#28 posted 07-20-2017 01:50 AM

No, I am not in the UK. I currently live in Australia, so I think it still all applies locally, but I was taught that in a short Contracts Law course that I did in one of the other ex-colonies of the UK.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1128 days


#29 posted 07-20-2017 03:04 AM

Hm… thousands follars of copper? Are you installing new roof?
And we hear only one side of the story. Why did she decide to get out of the contract? Was the job you did unacceptable?

View WoodES's profile

WoodES

152 posts in 2228 days


#30 posted 07-20-2017 03:56 AM

WC,
I have had experience with the California Contractor’s License laws and recommend you research this yourself depending on the work you were to perform. You can also contact the CLSB and ask them if the work you were to perform would require a license.

The basic definition of a contractor requiring a license is in the Business & Professions Code, Division 3, Chapter 9, Article 2, 7026.
  “Contractor,” for the purposes of this chapter, is synonymous with “builder” and, within the meaning of this chapter, a contractor is any person who undertakes to or offers to undertake to, or purports to have the capacity to undertake to, or submits a bid to, or does himself or herself or by or through others, construct, alter, repair, add to, subtract from, improve, move, wreck or demolish any building, highway, road, parking facility, railroad, excavation or other structure, project, development or improvement, or to do any part thereof, including the erection of scaffolding or other structures or works in connection therewith, or the cleaning of grounds or structures in connection therewith, or the preparation and removal of roadway construction zones, lane closures, flagging, or traffic diversions, or the installation, repair, maintenance, or calibration of monitoring equipment for underground storage tanks, and whether or not the performance of work herein described involves the addition to, or fabrication into, any structure, project, development or improvement herein described of any material or article of merchandise. “Contractor” includes subcontractor and specialty contractor. “Roadway” includes, but is not limited to, public or city streets, highways, or any public conveyance.

Your Attorney can explain the finer points of the law as prescribed by case law.

If your work would be permanently attached by you to the clients home or other structure then you may need a contractors license. If the contracted work is unattached then most likely a license is not required.

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/codes.xhtml

http://www.cslb.ca.gov/

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2968 posts in 2512 days


#31 posted 07-20-2017 04:51 AM

As stated above, if you are doing built ins, you need a contractors license.
Not sure, but I don’t think Tage Frid had a contractors license.

-- Paul, Duvall, WA

View playingwithmywood's profile

playingwithmywood

444 posts in 2134 days


#32 posted 07-20-2017 05:18 AM

Thank God I do not live in CA

But why will he not just tell us what he was doing for her

View Redsoxfan's profile

Redsoxfan

38 posts in 2163 days


#33 posted 07-20-2017 10:41 AM

You probably do not need a contractors’ license, unless you go to their homes and work (Such as cabinet or built-in installs).

You do, however, most likely need a business permit.

-- Brian, Western MA

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3320 posts in 3313 days


#34 posted 07-20-2017 11:41 AM

My county and state are a pain in the backside. I can build anything I want and sell it. Depending upon how much I sell determines whether it is a hobby or business. I keep it to hobby level.

That doesn’t mean I can hang it on the wall or in otherwise install what I make – to do that, I would need a home improvement license. I tell the customer this and who they hire to install it is up to them. If they break it, the repairs are additional. If they drive a screw through a pipe or electrical cable – not my problem.

It is sad it has come down to this but I am not not going to have the permit or inspectors slap me with fines. I did some work on my daughter’s house and had the building/electrical inspector check my work since it is in a different state. He told me that it is illegal for me to make those kinds of changes. He went on to tell me that every one of the things I did exceeded code requirements and it was refreshing to see some work that was actually safe. He went on to say that the original panel was a mess and wanted to see who approved it. He looked at the the Inspector’s signature and it was his. Things change over 40 years. We discussed what I was planning to do in the house – electrically, and told me that this would be one of the few houses that was actually safe.

The moral to the story – if you are going to do something, do it by the numbers and a little better. You can sometimes be surprised at the outcome. But you need to do your research – I have had (in previous careers) a Master HVAC license, a state 1st Class Stationary Engineer’s license, and a gas fitters license so I do have a fair background in some of this stuff.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3298 days


#35 posted 07-20-2017 01:52 PM

There is a lesson to be learned here. I used to use my home shop to make some money so I could buy more machines. The common practice here in Atlanta is at the beginning of the job the materials purchased to be involved in the job are to billed directly to the client by the materials supplier. Or the material cost is to be paid in advance to the contractor. I and my clients preferred the former. Also, predetermined progress payments are made in the contract for larger longer running jobs.

You have to protect yourself in these arrangements and also make the client feel protected. It is a delicate balance.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

437 posts in 2781 days


#36 posted 07-20-2017 02:26 PM

Jon Hobbs covered it perfectly!!

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#37 posted 07-20-2017 05:20 PM



Jon Hobbs covered it perfectly!!

- Snipes

Who is John Hobbs, I don’t know why people refuse to use the “quote” feature.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 919 days


#38 posted 07-20-2017 05:40 PM

No he didn’t, none of that matters. It’s all speculation. Unless the information given is applicable directly to his state and directly to his county the thoughts and advice here don’t mean squat, it’s all opinion.

This thread isn’t about getting advice, it’s about a rant of the situation.


Jon Hobbs covered it perfectly!!

- Snipes


View jimintx's profile

jimintx

926 posts in 2121 days


#39 posted 07-20-2017 08:14 PM



Who is John Hobbs, I don t know why people refuse to use the “quote” feature.

- AlaskaGuy

Joh Hobs is a member here. He posts under his own name (imagine that).
He wrote a thoughtful piece of information in post #11 of this thread.
Sometime, I don’t know why people don’t read the whole thread in which they are participating, ... unless of course its one of the endless ones on LJ, with thousands of entries.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#40 posted 07-20-2017 08:34 PM

Who is John Hobbs, I don t know why people refuse to use the “quote” feature.

- AlaskaGuy

Joh Hobs is a member here. He posts under his own name (imagine that).
He wrote a thoughtful piece of information in post #11 of this thread.
Sometime, I don t know why people don t read the whole thread in which they are participating, ... unless of course its one of the endless ones on LJ, with thousands of entries.

- jimintx


I have read the whole thread. Can I remember who said what it every post in the thread…..hell no. Maybe you can but I can’t and I’ll bet I”m not alone.

In this case (and many others) I had to go back through the thread and find John post and refresh my memory. OK maybe not a big deal but neither is using the quote feature that makes things easier. Just MHO

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12924 posts in 2917 days


#41 posted 07-20-2017 08:57 PM


He went on to say that the original panel was a mess and wanted to see who approved it. He looked at the the Inspector s signature and it was his.
- dbray45

Same situation happened to us in a commercial building. Inspector came and started ranting about the wiring and what idiot ever signed off on it … you guessed it, he did. Except it was 5 years instead of 40. His face went so red I thought he would have an aneurysm.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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jimintx

926 posts in 2121 days


#42 posted 07-20-2017 10:59 PM

Okay, MHO (aka AlaskaGuy) – you’re definitely right about that.
I had to go back to find the post by member “John Hobbs”.
.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View magaoitin's profile

magaoitin

249 posts in 1486 days


#43 posted 07-20-2017 11:30 PM

You probably have enough info on this already, and John in post #11 has the right of it. As a General Contractor licensed in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska, and California I have a couple points that you might want to consider. You are in a scary situation, but not for what has been stated above.

California is the hardest and most difficult state, west of the Mississippi to be a general contractor. And to my knowledge only New York is worse. I have personal experience with a guy in your situation, that for a $5,000 renovation, he ended up +$50k in fines and was not allowed to get a contractors licence again in CA.

1. The good news (if you can call it that):Your customer cannot sue you for not being a licensed contractor. She can only sue you for a breach in your contract. ie you did not finish on time, damaged her property, poor workmanship, etc…something that is specific in the contract that was breached on your part. I hope you have a good contract and not something you just found on the internet.

2. What she can do, is turn you in to the Department of Licensing & Department of Revenue and be a evil witch, but it will not get her any money, just hurt you beyond belief. They will fine you (heavily) for doing business without a contracting licence, Bonding , and Insurance. I am going out on a limb and will assume since you don’t have a contractors licence you don’t have insurance or bonding. Then the State DOL will turn it over to the City you reside in, and they get to fine you for not having a Business licence in your home city, and (depending on the City your client’s house is in) her city can fine you for not having a business licence in their specific city.

3. Expect a call from the CA Department of Revenue as well. Once the City’s and State Department of Licencing have their teeth in you they will refer this to the DOR. You obviously are not paying taxes on your work, so hopefully you at least have the receipts for the material. This can go State, then Federal for tax evasion/under reporting.

4. Since you did go to the trouble of signing a contract, she is bound by that as well to give notice for termination (if you included a termination clause in the contract whether it is for cause or convenience). If she has breached the contract, then you are free to sue her for lost profit, material and labor costs, etc…as long as it was in your contract.

As others state above, I am not a lawyer. But I have done work in your State for commercial and government projects for over 15 years, and the only way I have found that you can be a general contractor in CA without a CA contractors licence, is if you are working on Federal Property (park, military base, whatever). Even then you have to have a contractors licence in some other state at a minimum, plus you still need a business licence for the city you are working in.

Good luck

-- Jeff ~ Tacoma Wa.

View BareFootWoodworks's profile

BareFootWoodworks

6 posts in 847 days


#44 posted 07-20-2017 11:58 PM

Seeing as I ran into the same problem in my home state of PA a number of years ago, I’ve learned as a general rule of thumb that if you are making any form of alteration to the structure of a residential dwelling having a contractors license is required or at least extremely helpful.

However for CA specificly:

Who must be licensed as a contractor?

All businesses and individuals who construct or alter, or offer to construct or alter, any building, highway, road, parking facility, railroad, excavation, or other structure in California (other than federal projects located in California) must be licensed by the CSLB if the total cost of labor and materials under one or more contracts on the project is $500 or more.

Note: Contractors who work with asbestos or other hazardous substances are regulated by the U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, as well as by the CSLB.

Manufacturer Exemption: Manufacturers who sell or install finished products that do not become a fixed part of a structure are not required to have a contractor’s license.

Credit:
https://calconstructionlawblog.com/2013/09/04/what-you-need-to-know-about-obtaining-a-contractors-license-in-california/

As long as whatever you were making was made in your shop and not affixed to the structure then you should meet the exemption.

Since my experience, I simply contract an installer to do any installations work for me.

-- ~That Guy~

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

437 posts in 2781 days


#45 posted 07-22-2017 12:07 AM

Jon Hobbs covered it perfectly!!

- Snipes
Who is John Hobbs, I don t know why people refuse to use the “quote” feature.

Ak- that was choice not refusal.
Who is Jon Hobbs? That is a very good question.. Jon is a woodworker, a lumberjock, a well spoken man, obviously articulate, educated, a man of dignity. I could go on and on, but the answer is not as simple as the question..

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#46 posted 07-22-2017 12:15 AM


Jon Hobbs covered it perfectly!!

- Snipes
Who is John Hobbs, I don t know why people refuse to use the “quote” feature.

Ak- that was choice not refusal.
Who is Jon Hobbs? That is a very good question.. Jon is a woodworker, a lumberjock, a well spoken man, obviously articulate, educated, a man of dignity. I could go on and on, but the answer is not as simple as the question..

- AlaskaGuy

- Snipes


Is something bothering you?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AZWoody

1461 posts in 1761 days


#47 posted 07-22-2017 12:21 AM

I don’t feel like going through every thread again but was there every any clarification on what the job actually was or is everyone just speculating on whether or not he needed a contractor’s license?

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AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2846 days


#48 posted 07-22-2017 01:02 AM



I don t feel like going through every thread again but was there every any clarification on what the job actually was or is everyone just speculating on whether or not he needed a contractor s license?

- AZWoody

No, the OP bailed on us. Never ever said what the scope of the work was.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

23965 posts in 3220 days


#49 posted 07-22-2017 01:04 AM

Maybe the OP needs to be bailed out?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1935 posts in 1751 days


#50 posted 07-22-2017 01:27 AM

As J Bay said, “I’m no lawyer, but here, if you attach anything to a wall you need to have a contractor’s license.” He is correct, I am a former B General contractor and lawyer and professional woodworker (verification can be verified) may I add:
Under AZ contractor law once you engage with performing work in a person’s home you will need a license of some sort with restriction on the type of work.
There is the “Handy Man exemption” that exempts a person from needing a license, for work at $1,000 or less. Similar to restrictions, on a B General or a lesser classification; you cannot work on heating/cooling, electrical and plumbing.
Aside, you can piecemeal parts of your contract into various $999 yet under $1,000 to stay in the handyman exemption.
Now we have the previous comments of “take her to court, with your contract!”
Take note: Any contract that is:
In a lawsuit, if the court finds a contract to be unconscionable, they will typically declare the contract to be void. No damages award or specific performance will be issued, but instead the parties will be released from their contract obligations.
Bang! End of story, game stops. If she wants more $$$, then it is a new game.
You have my sympathies to the position that you are in- as for those other woodworkers down the street- some people are luckier than others.
In AZ and Detroit I could tell you stories on how unlicensed guys payback, but you do not seem the type to throw a rock through her window. You are too nice of a guy to be in this business.

-- Desert_Woodworker

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