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View Jacksdad's profile

What is the worst woodworking purchase that you have made.

by Jacksdad
posted 07-18-2017 03:27 AM


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109 replies

109 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12945 posts in 2938 days


#1 posted 07-18-2017 04:02 AM

Worst purchase is an online woodworking membership. I don’t want to say which one because I have tons of respect for the person(s) involved and he/they are good people but the site is poorly setup and much of the content costs additional money beyond the membership fee. Worst tool purchase was a Crown marking gauge I bought in the 90’s. I’ve never liked it and the ones I make are better.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1148 days


#2 posted 07-18-2017 04:14 AM

Mine was by Craftsman too. Back in the ‘80s I bought their newfangled flex shaft drive table saw, where the motor and arbor are connected by a flex shaft much like those on rotary tools. The shaft made a 180º bend between the motor and arbor and under anything but the lightest load would start to wobble. That, combined with the typical crappy stamped metal side extensions and sheetmetal fence that wasn’t flat, made it totally unusable. I sold it to a coworker who loved it, so everyone wound up happy.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1014 posts in 1109 days


#3 posted 07-18-2017 11:10 AM

Harbor Freight chisel set. The handles literally fell apart. Only a $10 mistake tho

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Sparks500's profile

Sparks500

255 posts in 889 days


#4 posted 07-18-2017 12:19 PM

Ryobi BT3000. Tablesaw that does everything, none of it very well.

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

578 posts in 2104 days


#5 posted 07-18-2017 12:29 PM

I bought a biscuit jointer because Norm told me to and I might use it once every couple years. I’d just sell it but I’d feel guilty about the poor sucker who buys it.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5832 posts in 3052 days


#6 posted 07-18-2017 01:16 PM

The Porter Cable detail sander…..worse piece of junk ever put on the market. After that, and a very close second: a Craftsman Radial Arm saw. I’d get it tuned and set to zero, and it would shift before the first cut. For the record, I love the RAS…as long as it’s not a Craftsman.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Aj2's profile (online now)

Aj2

2558 posts in 2356 days


#7 posted 07-18-2017 01:18 PM

Cheap clamps from Rockler they didn’t make it thru one glue up.I was able to return them but it was a waste of my time and time is something you don’t get back.

-- Aj

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11901 posts in 3987 days


#8 posted 07-18-2017 01:19 PM

FREUD SAW BLADES!!!!
However, I can thank them for sending me on a search for good blades.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

723 posts in 1046 days


#9 posted 07-18-2017 01:30 PM

Besides my Black and Decker electric caulking gun,

the most useless tool I own is the Craftsman Autohammer.

I Actually used it once to install some can lighting between joists where backswing was limited.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1360 posts in 1467 days


#10 posted 07-18-2017 01:38 PM

3M Sanding block. Wastes as much sandpaper as it utilizes. Stupidest excuse for a tool I’ve ever purchased. Went back to Home Depot and got my money back the same day, though. Just on principle.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1472 posts in 998 days


#11 posted 07-18-2017 01:57 PM

I buy mostly “old sh_t”, (according to my wife) so when I get a bad tool, I can’t complain much. If I get home with a bad tool, it’s usually because I didn’t look close enough at it before buying it, which has happened several times. : (

However, when I first thought I was getting into woodworking back in the late 70’s/early 80’s, I bought a Shopsmith with several attachments and stuff. One thing in particular in that bunch of “stuff” was the set of shaper cutters and an arbor for them. Well made it all is but, a good purchase it was not. Without a speed changer, which I didn’t have, the cutters turned much too slow and would hog. I shot a couple boards across the shop with it. One piece whizzed passed me and hit the big metal swing up door on the other end of the shop leaving a nice big dent. I still have the set of cutters somewhere.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1148 days


#12 posted 07-18-2017 02:07 PM



The Porter Cable detail sander…..worse piece of junk ever put on the market.

- Fred Hargis

I forgot all about that, probably because it is stored somewhere that I can’t even recall. Seemed like a cool idea, but the adhesive on the back of the paper wasn’t strong enough for it to maintain the shape of the sanding head. What good is a detail head if the sandpaper is always flat?

View Babieca's profile

Babieca

178 posts in 2062 days


#13 posted 07-18-2017 02:27 PM

Harbor freight workbench. I’ve modified it into something useful , but I could have spend the same money on wood and a couple lengths of threaded rod and built myself a much better bench while learning along the way.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1334 days


#14 posted 07-18-2017 02:27 PM

Contenders:

-Lie Nielsen crosscut backsaw. I got a lemon.
-Kreg pocket hole jig. Because I don’t use it at all.
-Stupid jig that lets you cut sheet goods with your circular saw. Because its still in the box because there are better ways to do it.
-Dividers. Who the hell needs dividers? Ever heard of a ruler? (No not the stupidly expensive crucible ones)

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1148 days


#15 posted 07-18-2017 02:49 PM


-Dividers. Who the hell needs dividers? Ever heard of a ruler? (No not the stupidly expensive crucible ones)

- gargey

Make yourself a sector and you’ll use them all the time. It makes some tasks easy that would otherwise be difficult and inaccurate.

You’ll also learn a lot about design principles in the process.

https://www.byhandandeye.com/sector-secrets/

View DS's profile

DS

3343 posts in 2979 days


#16 posted 07-18-2017 02:57 PM

Harbor Freight trim router. Was on sale under $10. How could that go wrong?

The spindle shaft was bent and the first time I turned it on, it vibrated so horrendously that it flew out of my hands!
I was lucky to not get seriously injured.

Round trip gas to return it would cost more than the $10 so I just chucked it in the trash.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

723 posts in 1046 days


#17 posted 07-18-2017 03:00 PM



Harbor Freight trim router. Was on sale under $10. How could that go wrong?

The spindle shaft was bent and the first time I turned it on, it vibrated so horrendously that it flew out of my hands!
I was lucky to not get seriously injured.

Round trip gas to return it would cost more than the $10 so I just chucked it in the trash.

- DS


Forgot about that one. I got one for $20. The motor might be good for something but the base will not stay locked making it completely unsuited for it’s stated purpose. If you try to route a roundover you may start without a lip but you will finish with one.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6755 posts in 2824 days


#18 posted 07-18-2017 03:04 PM

Makita power planer. I’ve used it maybe 3 times. I’ve tried to sell it and nobody wants it either.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1334 days


#19 posted 07-18-2017 03:05 PM

“Make yourself a sector and you’ll use them all the time.” No I won’t. I’m not you.

As for dividers teaching design principles, that sounds like what’s spouted from the “By Hand & Eye” stuff, which I think is the biggest load of crap to have come from Lost Art Press(Note 1). Contrived BS. My opinion.

My design approach is different.

(Note 1) FYI I am a fan of a lot of what they do. Wearing’s book is awesome.

Edit: P.S. Just saw you included a link to “By Hand & Eye,” did not see that when I wrote this post.

View PPK's profile

PPK

1576 posts in 1368 days


#20 posted 07-18-2017 03:05 PM

Alltrade air impact wrench and air hammer. The impact wrench is so weak it can’t take off lug nuts at more than about 40 ft. lbs. Air pressure doesn’t matter. The air hammer quit working altogether long ago… You get what you pay for – in this case, not much!

I guess that wasn’t really a woodworking tool. One of my big beefs is the mild steel excuses that Stanley and Tool Shop (or any home improvement store) sell as a flat bar. The thing bends and permanently deforms like a wet noodle when you apply any pressure at all. Used to be you could get a flat bar made out of decent steel that you’d really have to muscle to bend.

-- Pete

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

493 posts in 1809 days


#21 posted 07-18-2017 03:10 PM

I don’t use my second MicroJig Grrripper ever. Having said that, there are times when my first Grrripper is the best tool for the job. I just didn’t need a second one.

I gave my HF combo sander away. The dust collection on it is useless.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6759 posts in 3753 days


#22 posted 07-18-2017 03:27 PM

The absolute worst tool I ever bought was a DeWalt 20” scroll saw, with stand, dust blower, work light, and extra blades….I paid over $500+ for it, been turned on 2 times, and never cut a piece of wood with it….Thought I might need it in case some scroll work was involved in projects, but have never used it for that purpose…It just sits in my shop gathering dust…...What a waste of good $$$$...I should of bought a DeWalt sliding miter saw instead…..

-- " There's a better way to do it.....find it"...... Thomas Edison.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6678 posts in 1271 days


#23 posted 07-18-2017 03:29 PM

my very first ever big purchase was an CRAPsman redial arm saw ….only bought it cuz grandpa had 1 …and I thought at that time in my life so did I …..the saw was a pile of CRAP …...IF YOU WANTED A SQUARE CUT ….you had to hold the arm one way or the other ….no adjustment at all ….now they are all over craigs list here for $35.00 I had paid 225.00 off ebay and had to drive 4 hours to get it LMAO :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Craftsman on the lake

3063 posts in 3996 days


#24 posted 07-18-2017 03:42 PM

Harbor Freight 4” grinders. I purchased three of them for $9 each. Each one lasted 20 minutes before the gearhead started smoking.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 940 days


#25 posted 07-18-2017 03:57 PM

The Kreg Multi-Mark. Just not worth the $15. Maybe $5. Maybe.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1472 posts in 998 days


#26 posted 07-18-2017 04:57 PM

Dividers can be the bee’s knees when doing hand cut dovetails. I didn’t want to shell out the bucks for a nice Starrett so I made ‘something’ that resembles dividers. It works but not pretty by any stretch of the imagination. I keep thinking that one day I will walk into a junk store and there will be a nice pair of dividers sitting there waiting for me and be on the cheap side. : )
Mike


Contenders:

-Lie Nielsen crosscut backsaw. I got a lemon.
-Kreg pocket hole jig. Because I don t use it at all.
-Stupid jig that lets you cut sheet goods with your circular saw. Because its still in the box because there are better ways to do it.
-Dividers. Who the hell needs dividers? Ever heard of a ruler? (No not the stupidly expensive crucible ones)

- gargey


-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3294 posts in 2906 days


#27 posted 07-18-2017 05:11 PM

There are any number of store bought jigs and such hiding in the dark corners of the various cabinets in the shop, but I would have to give the “lemon” award to the Bench Dog cast iron router top, fence, base, and insert/lift plate that I bought from Rockler. Costing well over $100 and weighing almost that much, it doesn’t have much going for it beyond the fact that it is flat. If you are curious about all of the shortcomings, check out the review I wrote.

Coming in second place is the cheap P/C belt/disk sander. Terrible design and poorly built.

Honorable mention goes to the Jet drum sander I sold a few years ago. I don’t even want to remember how many rolls of sandpaper I burned up trying to get it to work properly.

Another honorable mention is the Jet air cleaner hanging from the ceiling, it’s loud, the replacement filters are crazy expensive (so was the unit), and I still have fine dust in all the wrong places. Then there is the Laguna dust collector I recently bought…..

Enough of this – I’m getting worked up on how much stuff I bought with high hopes and lots of research only to find out they weren’t really that great, or worse, terrible. All the more reason for all of us to write honest product reviews of the products we buy/use whether good, bad, or ugly to help others make more informed decisions and not wind up with the same buyer’s regret.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2617 posts in 2403 days


#28 posted 07-18-2017 05:24 PM



There are any number of store bought jigs and such hiding in the dark corners of the various cabinets in the shop, but I would have to give the “lemon” award to the Bench Dog cast iron router top, fence, base, and insert/lift plate that I bought from Rockler. Costing well over $100 and weighing almost that much, it doesn t have much going for it beyond the fact that it is flat. If you are curious about all of the shortcomings, check out the review I wrote.

Coming in second place is the cheap P/C belt/disk sander. Terrible design and poorly built.

Honorable mention goes to the Jet drum sander I sold a few years ago. I don t even want to remember how many rolls of sandpaper I burned up trying to get it to work properly.

Another honorable mention is the Jet air cleaner hanging from the ceiling, it s loud, the replacement filters are crazy expensive (so was the unit), and I still have fine dust in all the wrong places. Then there is the Laguna dust collector I recently bought…..

Enough of this – I m getting worked up on how much stuff I bought with high hopes and lots of research only to find out they weren t really that great, or worse, terrible. All the more reason for all of us to write honest product reviews of the products we buy/use whether good, bad, or ugly to help others make more informed decisions and not wind up with the same buyer s regret.

- EarlS


I got the jet air cleaner on sale for $250, but I wanted to let you know the filters can be had on Amazon for about 6 dollars each in a box of 6.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005ESOBE4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Based on how dirty the filters get it is cleaning a lot of particles from the air.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7803 posts in 3472 days


#29 posted 07-18-2017 05:32 PM

This old griper doesn’t care for his pair of MicroJig Grrrippers. IMO, these things were meant for beginning woodworkers. There are plenty of other “safe” ways of using your TS, BS, etc. My biggest gripe is having to remove “other” safety devices in order to use these “Grippers”. Safety devices should compliment other existing safety devices, NOT eliminate them.

Expensive push stick… 8^P

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2617 posts in 2403 days


#30 posted 07-18-2017 05:35 PM



3M Sanding block. Wastes as much sandpaper as it utilizes. Stupidest excuse for a tool I ve ever purchased. Went back to Home Depot and got my money back the same day, though. Just on principle.

- Ripper70


I bought the Shopsmith round velcro sanding block that holds regular 5 inch sanding disks, they are awesome and the disks sampler that comes with it is pretty good as well.

Since I use a round holder, I use the 3m for corners and tight edges the shopsmith doesn’t work well with. For that it is great. I have a lot of sheet sandpaper and doubt I will ever use it all, so the waste is secondary to the functionality for me.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7511 posts in 3926 days


#31 posted 07-18-2017 05:40 PM

Ryobi detail sander!
Vibrates way too much and causes muscle fatigue in about 10 minutes!

Ryobi, countersink set!
Works fine in cold butter but not much else!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5420 posts in 2867 days


#32 posted 07-18-2017 06:08 PM



I bought a biscuit jointer because Norm told me to and I might use it once every couple years. I d just sell it but I d feel guilty about the poor sucker who buys it.

- mramseyISU

I have a few tools I don’t use often. When I do need them I’ll so happy I have them. Once a tool is acquire I don’t sell them. A tool is forever money is temporary.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View ChuckV's profile (online now)

ChuckV

3245 posts in 4086 days


#33 posted 07-18-2017 06:47 PM

Not long after buying my table saw, I bought a fence micro-adjust thingy from Rockler. I very soon learned that it is much easier to just give the fence a tap with my finger.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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splintergroup

3053 posts in 1781 days


#34 posted 07-18-2017 06:55 PM

Argh! This topic reminded me of my Penn State 24” “Quick-Grip” style clamps. I bought 10 of them when they were on sale, probably spent $100 or so.

They slip when any force is applied. My guess is the bar lock gripping tabs are not hardened and have rounded over.

Some day I’ll spend the time an take them apart, then case harden those darn things 8^(

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JRsgarage

367 posts in 1068 days


#35 posted 07-18-2017 06:55 PM

i just don’t ever use it

-- “Facts don't care about your feelings.” ..., Ben Shapiro

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4600 posts in 4301 days


#36 posted 07-18-2017 08:14 PM

Porter Cable 444 profile sander.
At least I bought it used at an auction… but it is truly awful.

Sticky sandpaper cannot adhere to the rubber profiles, so it comes loose and tears, then makes black marks on the bare wood.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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ColonelTravis

1976 posts in 2452 days


#37 posted 07-18-2017 08:25 PM



As for dividers teaching design principles, that sounds like what s spouted from the “By Hand & Eye” stuff, which I think is the biggest load of crap to have come from Lost Art Press(Note 1). Contrived BS. My opinion.

- gargey

Good Lord. Have you even read the book? I’m guessing no.

1.) Dividers don’t teach you design principles. They’re tools for after you learn the principles.

2.) If you think proportion is BS and that basic shapes like squares and rectangles and circles are even more BS, fine. But that’s pretty much what the entire book is about. It makes complex designs easier to understand and create yourself, using methods that have been around for thousands of years and that don’t require, and are faster than, tape measure stupid math.

View RangerJay's profile

RangerJay

7 posts in 881 days


#38 posted 07-18-2017 08:41 PM

I have more tools than I would care to admit that are rarely, if ever, used – and all of them fit into the category of “impulse” buying. As much as I love Lee Valley I finally found myself turned off by all their specialty tools – guess I realized that my shop would never be big enough to hold all the tools I thought I needed – I think about a decade and a half ago I started buying tools with a whole new set of criteria – impulse is out the window – if I think I need a tool I try to find a work-around with what I’ve got – if that doesn’t pan out then I wait till I absolutely KNOW that I need it and will use it – and then I research the heck out of what I want to buy to make sure that I get the best tool out there for the best price.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1148 days


#39 posted 07-18-2017 09:03 PM


As for dividers teaching design principles, that sounds like what s spouted from the “By Hand & Eye” stuff, which I think is the biggest load of crap to have come from Lost Art Press(Note 1). Contrived BS. My opinion.

- gargey

Good Lord. Have you even read the book? I m guessing no.

1.) Dividers don t teach you design principles. They re tools for after you learn the principles.

2.) If you think proportion is BS and that basic shapes like squares and rectangles and circles are even more BS, fine. But that s pretty much what the entire book is about. It makes complex designs easier to understand and create yourself, using methods that have been around for thousands of years and that don t require, and are faster than, tape measure stupid math.

- ColonelTravis

I was surprised as well to see the concepts dismissed so readily. A solid understanding of proportions in furniture design can definitely improve anyone’s results. For example, the golden ratio can be found not only in designs far predating the Fibonacci sequence, but in nature as well. It’s truly mind boggling when you grasp how seemingly universal it is.

I’m sure many LJers know this, but for those who don’t, the Fibonacci sequence is defined as F(n) = F(n-1) + F(n-2), where F(0) = 0 and F(1) = 1. Hence, the sequence begins 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, [...]. What’s magical is that the ratio of F(n)/F(n-1) converges to the golden ratio (1.618025751…) as n goes to infinity.

Finally, toss in a sector and dividers become a very useful tool in the shop — one that I use all of the time.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2763 posts in 3480 days


#40 posted 07-18-2017 09:06 PM

My worst purchase was a Grizzly “Baby Drum Sander” Had it two years and had to replace the feed motor two times. Finally tossed it. Second worst was a DeWalt scroll saw. It died just out of warranty.

-- No PHD just a DD214

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1530 posts in 2194 days


#41 posted 07-18-2017 09:29 PM

20 years ago. A Porter Cable Aluminum table top router table.
It marks up the work pretty bad. I should have just made one. I’d been way better off.
Live and learn I guess.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 2028 days


#42 posted 07-18-2017 09:30 PM

I don’t know if I’m lucky or just inexperienced, but I don’t specifically have any tool purchases that I regret. An honorable mention might be a harbor freight framing square that was 1/8” out of square over 16 inches, or the harbor freight chalk line that frustrated me so much and was such a piece of garbage that I literally threw it into a corner of my yard while I was up on my roof.

My worst woodworking purchases are typically when I buy materials for a project that I’m excited about but haven’t thought through fully or don’t have the time to actually work on. My shop is full of half-made stuff or stacks of material waiting to become something cool.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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gargey

1013 posts in 1334 days


#43 posted 07-18-2017 10:51 PM


My worst woodworking purchases are typically when I buy materials for a project that I m excited about but haven t thought through fully or don t have the time to actually work on. My shop is full of half-made stuff or stacks of material waiting to become something cool.

- William Shelley

Yeah. I have too much butt-ugly poplar lying around that I’d thought I’d use for general purposes. Would rather have more mahogany or walnut. The board-foot conversion would result in 10x space savings!

(In reality I only have a couple dozen bf total, I don’t collect wood).

View Gart's profile

Gart

29 posts in 1975 days


#44 posted 07-19-2017 01:40 AM

One of these about 30 years ago from Menards. It was part of my learning curve (enough said).

Gart

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

703 posts in 1299 days


#45 posted 07-19-2017 02:20 PM

Shortly after getting married, we rented a house, and I decided I needed a drill to help put stuff together, assemble things, etc. This was before I ever did any trade work, and I didn’t know better, so I bought a Black and Decker kit from Wally world. Never used it much, but it was beyond worthless. Even the thicker, 1/2” bit would shear off with next to no effort.

Somehow it hung around my garage for a long time, even after getting a nice Makita combo (that replaced the Milwaukee set my last job issued me). Last junk day we had, it got tossed, and some local pickers salvaged it. According to my wife, they were fighting over who got to keep it…which just makes me sad.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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Dustin

703 posts in 1299 days


#46 posted 07-19-2017 02:25 PM


As for dividers teaching design principles, that sounds like what s spouted from the “By Hand & Eye” stuff, which I think is the biggest load of crap to have come from Lost Art Press(Note 1). Contrived BS. My opinion.

- gargey

Good Lord. Have you even read the book? I m guessing no.

1.) Dividers don t teach you design principles. They re tools for after you learn the principles.

2.) If you think proportion is BS and that basic shapes like squares and rectangles and circles are even more BS, fine. But that s pretty much what the entire book is about. It makes complex designs easier to understand and create yourself, using methods that have been around for thousands of years and that don t require, and are faster than, tape measure stupid math.

- ColonelTravis

I was surprised as well to see the concepts dismissed so readily. A solid understanding of proportions in furniture design can definitely improve anyone s results. For example, the golden ratio can be found not only in designs far predating the Fibonacci sequence, but in nature as well. It s truly mind boggling when you grasp how seemingly universal it is.

I m sure many LJers know this, but for those who don t, the Fibonacci sequence is defined as F(n) = F(n-1) + F(n-2), where F(0) = 0 and F(1) = 1. Hence, the sequence begins 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, [...]. What s magical is that the ratio of F(n)/F(n-1) converges to the golden ratio (1.618025751…) as n goes to infinity.

Finally, toss in a sector and dividers become a very useful tool in the shop — one that I use all of the time.

- RichTaylor

Thanks for bringing this up, Rich.
Wrote a paper on that during my final year of getting my math degree, and it was one of the few papers I enjoyed writing. If anyone has the free time, it’s certainly worth taking a minute to google “golden ratio in design”: you’ll find some cool stuff.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Tony Ennis's profile

Tony Ennis

137 posts in 3695 days


#47 posted 07-19-2017 02:29 PM

‘Bargain’ antique tools off of ebay.

-- Tony

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PPK

1576 posts in 1368 days


#48 posted 07-19-2017 04:18 PM



One of these about 30 years ago from Menards. It was part of my learning curve (enough said).

Gart

- Gart

Hey! I have that exact thing, and use it every so often when I don’t want to drag around my big miter saw! For $5 I think it makes a serviceable cut for certain things! Lol. In fact, I just used it the other day to put all the base shoe around a book case project I was working on.

Not trying to be contrary though, it can still be your worst purchase!

-- Pete

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magaoitin

249 posts in 1508 days


#49 posted 07-19-2017 07:02 PM

Wow where to start…

Drill presses..plural…I have bought too many from auctions and craigslist and have not landed a good one yet, but I am coming close to spending as much as if I had just bought a brand new one.

In the past 12-18 months
Continental International Drill Press 13-5 benchtop- $50
Ryobi DP121L benchtop – $35
Central Machinery 16 speed Drill Press floor mount $75
Woodtek 10” 5-speed benchtop – $75

-- Jeff ~ Tacoma Wa.

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gargey

1013 posts in 1334 days


#50 posted 07-19-2017 08:38 PM

Another addition:

Rockler brad point drill bits set. Some have dulled incredibly quickly, and another (the 1/8”) snapped in half while drilling into poplar – not a very hard wood. Their Forstner set also isn’t knocking my socks off.

To you guys, is it worth it to invest in expensive sets of brads and forstners? The prices can get up there with HSS (not even carbide), if you look at Lee Valley’s favored offerings, for instance.

I am a hobbyist, so the answer is not obviously yes.

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