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View Jim55's profile

help selecting resaw blades

by Jim55
posted 07-14-2017 09:45 PM


28 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1184 posts in 2103 days


#1 posted 07-14-2017 10:20 PM

Laguna Resaw King

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4190 days


#2 posted 07-14-2017 10:58 PM

Viking/Timber Wolf blades are good.

They can be resharpened. It can be done
with a dremel tool or sent out to a saw
shop.

I wasn’t impressed with Wood Slicer. They
cut great when new but dull rapidly and
cannot be resharpened by a shop due to
the variable-pitch design.

If you can afford it, carbide tipped blades
stay sharp a long, long time.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1132 days


#3 posted 07-14-2017 11:15 PM

I replaced a poor performing Olson with a Wood Slicer. It’s like night and day better, but I haven’t been using it long enough to comment on Loren’s rapid dulling experience.

I’ll say that, when new, it’s a joy to use.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

1022 posts in 3355 days


#4 posted 07-14-2017 11:30 PM

I am a fan of the “Wood Slicer” when new they cut very well and will have no issue with 4” oak. But I do admit they tend to dull sooner that I would expect.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2534 posts in 2340 days


#5 posted 07-15-2017 12:10 AM

Since you have a small bandsaw your going to be limited to balde choice.
I recommend the Olsen Pro .025 1/2 inch 3T hook it’s a very good blade. I use this balde on my small saw and it does pretty good.
The other option is to find a local saw sharpening service and have them make up blades for you.They can be a very affordable if you are going thru a lot of blades.

-- Aj

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

691 posts in 2004 days


#6 posted 07-15-2017 01:10 AM

I was going to use Lenox blades from this web site, and found alot of info here on about the difference in all the blade choices. Before I pulled the trigger though I found a shop here in Las Vegas that makes them on site. I am still experimenting with that purchase and will someday buy some Lenox blades just to just to compare.
https://www.bandsawbladesdirect.com/

They custom make any length blade. Click on the blade finder tab. I saw four wood blades that were offered at 1/2” and smaller. Two were carbon steel at about $16 for a 105” blade, a bi metal for around $40, and a Carbide for alot of cash. Around $150. I had read that for the hobby wood worker, and I know a couple pros that agree with this, that the carbide blade price is not worth it. At $16 a blade you just throw it away and move on as needed. Still, I would like to try out a carbide blade. Don’t know if I’ll ever spend that cash on it, but still curious.
Here is a link to blade info. Good reading. https://www.bandsawbladesdirect.com/technical-documents

-- John

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2754 posts in 3464 days


#7 posted 07-15-2017 08:50 PM

I used to get lots of pallet wood like you describe when I was working as a sheet metal worker. Mostly 4”x 4” x 10’. Soft and hard woods. I suggest you re-saw them on your table saw using a “planer” sawblade. (I use diablo) Not a combination blade. It will make a great cut. Much faster than a band saw. I have a 14” bandsaw with riser that uses 105” blades and I get them from “Supercut” I resaw 6” and 8” cedar, maple and oak boards to 3/8” and use their best , carbide impregnated, 1/2” resaw blade with good results. I have tried woodslicer blades and as has been said they do not last long. The Supercut carbide impregnated blades last about ten times as long as the woodslicer blades and cost the same. ($28) Again, I would not resaw a 4×4 using a bandsaw. I find any bandsaw cut will require planeing. so its thin kerf thickness is not much of a help.

-- No PHD just a DD214

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1146 days


#8 posted 07-15-2017 11:03 PM


I used to get lots of pallet wood like you describe when I was working as a sheet metal worker. Mostly 4”x 4” x 10 . Soft and hard woods. I suggest you re-saw them on your table saw using a “planer” sawblade. (I use diablo) Not a combination blade. It will make a great cut. Much faster than a band saw.

- Jim Finn


+1 It sounds like you have ample access to the material. Use the TS and flip end over end and run through the planer if need be. 10 times faster and much much cleaner cut. Since it’s free and ample waste isn’t a question. Cut them to varying thicknesses a little proud of like 3/4, 1”,1 1/2”. You can always resaw/plane them thinner.

As long as dimensions and conditions allow my TS is sometimes the best resaw tool in my shop.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3009 posts in 1765 days


#9 posted 07-15-2017 11:07 PM

A carbide tipped blade is worth the premium if you cut enough to wear it out. The only fear I would have is with pallets, there can be hidden nails and small rocks embedded into the surface which will kill any blade.

View Jim55's profile

Jim55

184 posts in 2609 days


#10 posted 07-15-2017 11:50 PM

Thanks for all the replys! I had tried a “wood slicer” once cutting some oak and cedar (Both very common in East Texas’ “piney Woods”) and it seemed to me to have dulled rather quickly.

My table saw only cuts 3-5/8”. Would ist still be time efective to saw oneway and have to flip it to make a second pass?

I take your point on the carbide blade costs. I just hate changing blades all that often. Sounds like the “carbide coated’ bandsaw blades, if not doing it on the table saw.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2468 posts in 3486 days


#11 posted 07-16-2017 12:18 AM

I quite worrying about following the set of the tooth and started just touching the top of each tooth with a 1-1/2” diamond coated grinding head I picked up at Harbor Freight. Since doing this, the process of sharpening is much quicker and I’ve been able to squeeze a lot of use out of even blades that fought with a nail. There are videos on this method and it’s well worth the time.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2534 posts in 2340 days


#12 posted 07-16-2017 01:50 AM

It’s safer to Resaw on the bandsaw.But hay feel free to live dangerously sometimes i do too.:)

-- Aj

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1146 days


#13 posted 07-17-2017 12:39 AM


My table saw only cuts 3-5/8”. Would ist still be time efective to saw oneway and have to flip it to make a second pass?
- Jim55

Yes, I think so especially if you’re cutting them for future use. A couple of 2” swipes on each edge of a 4’ board thru a TS takes less than a minute. That’s maybe 10 mins on a 14” BS. Plus, I’d want to save that resaw blade for actual projects. And like someone said, it’s pallet wood. BS blades don’t ignore nails like TS blades do. But that’s just me.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Jim55's profile

Jim55

184 posts in 2609 days


#14 posted 07-17-2017 05:11 AM

Again, thanks for the replies.

I am considering the super cuts carbide coated blades. Their “premium gold” “3 hook tooth” blade is available in 1/2” width for about $40 on ye olde Amazon.

Their “Resaw” blade with the 2-3 tpi is highly thought of round the web but, is only available in 5/8” minimum width. That’s a bit much for a 14” bs. Yet, they seem to think it’s all right. I have contacted them to see what they have to say about it. Also, this blade runs a lot higher, about $80 on Amazon (prices include shipping).

Still, cheaper than carbide toothed blades the cheapest in 1/2” w I have found so far runs $135 (no charge applied separately for shipping).

That’s all for now. I’ll report back with Supercut’s comments (if any).

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2754 posts in 3464 days


#15 posted 07-17-2017 12:04 PM

Jim 55: I suggest you call supercuts and order directly from them. I think they will sell that same blade to you for less than $40.

-- No PHD just a DD214

View Jim55's profile

Jim55

184 posts in 2609 days


#16 posted 07-17-2017 10:32 PM

I heard back from “Super Cuts” and If little else, found out why their “Wood Saver” blades don’t seem to last very long…

From ‘Super Cuts’;
“Just wanted to let you know that our Woodsaver blades are thin kerf blades which are designed for cutting exotic hardwoods.Because they are thin kerf they are used to get the most out of the expensive hardwoods so there isn’t a lot of waste after the resaw. Also because they thin kerf they do not last as long compared to our other blades.”

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2754 posts in 3464 days


#17 posted 07-17-2017 10:43 PM

I do not use SuperCuts “woodsaver” blades. I use their premium/ professional series gold 1/2” resaw blades. I have never tried true carbide blades, perhaps I should.

-- No PHD just a DD214

View grbmds's profile

grbmds

1 post in 1583 days


#18 posted 07-17-2017 11:33 PM

When reviewing posts, I saw the suggestion was made to resaw on the table saw. This is certainly possible, but definitely not a particularly safe way to resaw. The band saw is the best tool for re-sawing. A 14” bandsaw is certainly big enough to re-saw. I’ve never owned one any larger. Ideally it is better to have more than a 1 hp motor, but it will still work.

As for blades, 3 tip skip tooth is good. I recently bought the Wood Slicer and like it.

Don’t really know if carbide tipped is necessary or cost effective. Awhile back I read a review and comparison and it sounded like it was kind of a wash in terms of useful life and cost.

View Jim55's profile

Jim55

184 posts in 2609 days


#19 posted 07-18-2017 08:18 AM

Well, this is last call…

I heard back again from the folks at ‘supercuts’. I have to speak well of their customer service. The responce to my two emails have both come w/in 24 hours, the replies simple and to the point.
Here is the bulk of the last reply;

Yes if you were wanting the carbide impregnated blade then we would recommend the Premium Gold Carbide blade. It is better buy for your project and more cost effective. The 5/8” Woodsaver will work for your saw but if your not resawing expensive woods then we don’t recommend this blade for your resaw project for its purpose is to get the most out of the piece of wood your cutting but knowing the blade wont last as long because its a thin kerf blade Our price for the 105” x 1/2” x 0.025×3 Hook Gold Carbide Blade is 25.85$ per blade. Anything less then 10 blades ordered is a 9.75$ flat rate shipping and handling charge. 10 blades or more is free shipping, and every 12 blades you order is a free blade per invoice (must order 12 blades each time to receive free blade)”

I provide their price info merely as a courtesy. I have no affiliation with the company and get no compensation whatever for this sharing of iinformation.

I’m going to try their recommendation for the 3 hook tooth Gold blade.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

1022 posts in 3355 days


#20 posted 07-18-2017 10:02 AM

Please provide feedback on the results you get when using it. I have never used Supercuts, but after this post I may be interested.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1146 days


#21 posted 07-20-2017 04:11 AM


When reviewing posts, I saw the suggestion was made to resaw on the table saw. This is certainly possible, but definitely not a particularly safe way to resaw. The band saw is the best tool for re-sawing.
- grbmds

Understood but I was thinking about the material. He’s got trailer loads of free oak pallet wood. That’s a lot of resawing and a lot of blades and $. If it were me I’d spend a few hours cleaning up a stockpile of it. I guess you could call that resawing but I just call it ripping, jointing and squaring up rough stock, which I use a TS for. Then I’ll “resaw” it based on the project.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View skidiot's profile

skidiot

85 posts in 4187 days


#22 posted 07-30-2017 02:23 AM

Hi,
I have resawed tons of exactly the lumber you are working with. The major issues are that that wood has not been dried. So resawing green wood is more difficult than dry wood. Also, being rough sawn and not “lumber grade” but rather “pallet grade” You are going to run into problems with twisted and warped boards. The table saw method is OK, but you should joint the wood square first. If not you are still going to have a twisted board when you are done. Also running a twisted board through your TS is going to be hard on the machine. I ended up spending the money on a carbide tipped blade for my band saw. The green wood chewed up regular blades in no time. But, the carbide blade lasted for years, until it eventually snapped, but it was still sharp. Now all my skid lumber has been in my garage long enough that it is quite dry and a regular band saw blade works just fine. Good luck to you. You can get some really cool graining out of that kind of wood. The oak pieces have a 50-50 chance of being quarter sawn. Keep your eyes sharp for unusual grain.
Skidiot

-- skidiot northern illinois

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 1046 days


#23 posted 07-30-2017 01:24 PM

I have a 15” Powermatic band saw and I have been researching this topic of “re-sawing”....I will be odd man out here but it seems like to me the thing to take a good hard look at is “cost effective”....by the time you haul all this stuff home, store it until you need some, bust it apart so you can do something with it, buy a special blade and stand there for 10 minutes or more per board to do the re-saw, plane it, possibly let it dry and eventually maybe have a usable piece of what? Maple? Oak? That’s IF it don’t warp.
I have to ask, isn’t it less time and money {better} to just buy the oak or maple lumber grade board you need
? Now, I could see it if it was some exotic, expensive, rare, “stolen out of the jungle” and smuggled in endangered super wood that would double the projects value when you go to sell it, but just a piece of oak??? I mean, when you factor in all the stuff you have to go thru to get this piece of wood….what is really free? Or even “low cost”???? My own interest stemmed from some “free” cypress beams taken out of an old lighthouse that was built in 1857. It was torn down a few years back and given to me by a friend. I am not so sure if it is cost effective to re-saw.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2468 posts in 3486 days


#24 posted 07-30-2017 02:57 PM

msinc, a good example or two of the why’s are:

1) Re-sawing allowed me to deal with the pickup load of sycamore I got when I responded to a craigslist add. I couldn’t find comparable, highly figured sycamore in a lumber yard around here, especially in six or eight inch.

2) When I control the cutting, I get to make thick (e.g., 6”x6”x24”) blocks that can be turned in to nice mallets. The whole turning thing justifies big blade work for bowl blanks from a crotch can’t be put together from several slabs of walnut, or whatever.

3) There is the whole mining thing – you don’t know when you’re going to strike gold out of a block you acquired from that tree the wind took down in the neighbor’s yard.

4) My friend up the road a ways, has a constantly changing supply of wood. Currently, he has piles of cherry, apple, and walnut. He also has the odd piece of butternut, madrona and what have you.

5) I am surrounded by apple, apricot, pear and cherry orchards. Every year, orchardist take down thousands of tons of branches and even one hundred acre orchards in the process of grooming the trees or pursuing the next greatest crop. You won’t find any of that in a wood store, including the highly figured cherry. Of course, all of this is great for small projects, once it’s milled.

6) When you’re starting out and nickles are sparse, salvaging wood can mean the difference between boredom and working a project. I have several pallet project pieces that are older than my kids and that I can’t part with. Oddly, one is pine and it’s the museum worthy one (waiting a repair and a new mirror because of a move).

Back in the early seventies, I even cleaned my sand belts. Of course, as time became more precious and money more available, they just got tossed.

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

376 posts in 1222 days


#25 posted 07-30-2017 04:42 PM

A 1/2” carbide bandsaw blade is something I’d like to invest in in the future. I’d be a little nervous using it on pallet wood though… I guess you’ll be really careful to remove all the nails, and maybe clean the surfaces with a brush before running them through the saw… I’d hate to damage a $135 blade.

I have used the timberwolf blades and the woodslicer blades – I prefer woodslicer. I think they leave a cleaner cut, and cut more quietly. I also agree that they dull kind of quickly, but I thought that about the timberwolf blade I used too. The Timberwolf blade I got didn’t have a great weld, but both the woodslicers I’ve used have been perfect. Another thing to think about is that the woodslicer is a narrower blade than the timberwolf, so you’ll lose less lumber with each slice. Might not matter much if you’re slicing them into 4/4, but if you’re doing any thinner stock, it’d be something to think about.

If you try the $40 carbide coated blades, I’d love to hear how you like them! Might be worth looking into.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2754 posts in 3464 days


#26 posted 07-30-2017 06:28 PM



I have a 15” Powermatic band saw and I have been researching this topic of “re-sawing”....I will be odd man out here but it seems like to me the thing to take a good hard look at is “cost effective”....
I am not so sure if it is cost effective to re-saw”.

- msinc


Makes sense. But I do not know of an inexpensive way to buy 3/8” wood so I buy 1” and resaw it myself.

-- No PHD just a DD214

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1132 days


#27 posted 07-30-2017 06:55 PM

There are also the decorative possibilities. Making a panel out of resawn 8/4 instead of 4/4 allows for book matching, slip matching and other nice ways to enhance the grain patterns.

Here’s a panel for the side of a vanity I did recently out of knotty alder. The panel boards are resawn from 8/4 and book matched. I see what looks like an afghan hound wearing Alice Cooper makeup in there :)

View khanfused's profile

khanfused

3 posts in 839 days


#28 posted 08-03-2017 01:57 AM

Buy 5 wood slicers because, while they will cut great, they will dull reasonably early with the abuse you plan on putting them through.

OR… you could buy one Resaw King… amazing… truly amazingly smooth finish and a pretty fast cut rate… until you hit the first piece of nail that broke off… you did say pallets right ? Yes… buy ONE 150 dollar blade and you will never do it again.

Seriously… unless you plan on cutting a ready to finish surface.. from…pallets ?... I think you will be pleased with the wood slicer… and you seriously can buy five of them for even money.

heck, you might even buy just four and use the extra money for some better wood… just for the sheer frivolity of it.

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