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Summer Work

by LDO2802
posted 07-12-2017 07:55 PM


33 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5395 posts in 2736 days


#1 posted 07-12-2017 07:59 PM

Start early in the morning and quit at lunch.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View LDO2802's profile

LDO2802

167 posts in 815 days


#2 posted 07-12-2017 08:08 PM

Its 110 by 9 a.m. where I live. (Which is apparently the 9th layer of hell)

View TraylorPark's profile

TraylorPark

213 posts in 1983 days


#3 posted 07-12-2017 08:12 PM

You mean kind of like this? :)

-- --Zach

View r33tc0w's profile

r33tc0w

174 posts in 869 days


#4 posted 07-12-2017 08:15 PM

LDO – I put an A/C unit in my attached 1-car garage, lined my garage door with radiant barrier and have a fan running which keeps the louisiana heat at bay, even during mid-day. The exterior brick walls are not insulated but somehow this combo keeps things comfortable

-- Matthew 13:53-58

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2794 days


#5 posted 07-12-2017 08:34 PM

Did all my woodworking outside, including this sign, in the sun while in Iraq. Cannot say it was fun cooking in my own juice!!!!

ROFLMAO

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View KelleyCrafts's profile

KelleyCrafts

3712 posts in 1124 days


#6 posted 07-12-2017 08:40 PM

Toughen up buttercup!!!

I have a shity little swamp cooler that makes me THINK it’s a little cooler in my shop. I lose 10lbs every summer (not kidding).

-- Dave - http://kelleycrafts.com/ - pen blanks - knife scales - turning tools

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

30347 posts in 2723 days


#7 posted 07-12-2017 09:21 PM

I work regardless of the temperature until below 10° F

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Babieca's profile

Babieca

178 posts in 1889 days


#8 posted 07-12-2017 09:26 PM

Austin isn’t quite as bad as your neck of the woods, but it gets hot and stays hot.

Mostly I work at night, stay hydrated, and dream of moving somewhere like Michigan or Ohio where the air is cool and I can get cherry, walnut, and maple for $2 bf from an Amish sawmill.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4555 posts in 4127 days


#9 posted 07-12-2017 09:33 PM


Did all my woodworking outside, including this sign, in the sun while in Iraq. Cannot say it was fun cooking in my own juice!!!!

ROFLMAO

- woodbutcherbynight


Bet the paint dried fast though!!

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2257 posts in 2183 days


#10 posted 07-12-2017 09:37 PM

I hate the summer my shop is uninsulated.When it gets 100 I have no interest to drip sweat.Been trying to convince my wife to let me build a carving bench for my corner of the living room.
So far all I got was a look.
I was a roofer here in Cali for 35years so I’ve had my share of heat and sun.

-- Aj

View LDO2802's profile

LDO2802

167 posts in 815 days


#11 posted 07-12-2017 10:00 PM

I get the suffer through it thought, but I am 100% a craftsman who does it for pleasure. If I am suffering through it, it eliminates my fun. LOL. Work stressed me out enough without it following me home.

View LDO2802's profile

LDO2802

167 posts in 815 days


#12 posted 07-12-2017 10:01 PM


Did all my woodworking outside, including this sign, in the sun while in Iraq. Cannot say it was fun cooking in my own juice!!!!

ROFLMAO

- woodbutcherbynight

I feel I have seen a similar sign before…............ Did you have a pet donkey on your base? LOL

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woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2794 days


#13 posted 07-12-2017 10:03 PM


Bet the paint dried fast though!!

- DrDirt

Painting took a new art, you did not need a brush, just stir and pour really fast. Almost dries as it touched the wood. Was crazy!!!! Spray paint dried as you sprayed it. 30 minutes “painting” = a shirt and fresh pair of socks and gallon of deodorant, heavy duty, think for a Elephant!!

These days I turn on the A/C in the shop an hour before working and none of this sweating my body weight in an hour.

LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3107 posts in 2557 days


#14 posted 07-12-2017 10:26 PM

98 right now shop is 81. I love insulation. Open all windows at night close them in morning. With a fan moving a little air I can work all day end at 110.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

379 posts in 1270 days


#15 posted 07-12-2017 11:35 PM

A Walmart window air conditioner?

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View Just_Iain's profile

Just_Iain

300 posts in 801 days


#16 posted 07-13-2017 12:30 AM

Above 90F, I get real scarce and avoid going outside. But Toronto is like that and occasionally it gets to -20F and again I don’t go out if necessary. -30F and getting in the car to go to the office shall be avoided if possible. Out west in Edmonton, that’s the temperature at the bus stop.

-- For those about to die, remember your bicycle helmet!

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1864 posts in 2702 days


#17 posted 07-13-2017 02:16 AM

My workshop isn’t air-conditioned but it’s almost always cooler inside it than outside. So I usually prefer to be in the shop on hot days anyway.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12796 posts in 2765 days


#18 posted 07-13-2017 05:50 AM

I have a window unit, without it I wouldn’t last more than 30 minutes in mid summer.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2704 posts in 3307 days


#19 posted 07-13-2017 12:06 PM

I am in west Texas where it hits 100° regularly. I run two window air conditioners in my 23×13 feet ,insulated shop. With a coupla’ fans also blowing the air around in there, it is comfortable. I am in there from 6AM to 2PM every day. I leave the air conditioners run in there 24 hours a day. Life is good!

-- No PHD just a DD214

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

472 posts in 3420 days


#20 posted 07-13-2017 02:13 PM

I made a fan/filter using an old furnace blower that moves a very large volume of air. I point it at myself while I’m working, so I get a steady flow of fresh air to keep me cool. Without it, my clothes wold be dripping in a few minutes, and I’d have stains from drops of sweat on the wood.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View Robert's profile

Robert

3393 posts in 1865 days


#21 posted 07-13-2017 02:27 PM

90° 75% humidity is far worse then 110 25%

I am fortunate enough to have the space so I build an insulated conditioned room where I keep all my hand tools and workbench. I do virtually all my ww’ing in there.

However in the machine part of the shop it can get pretty unbearable. I keep a jug of Gatorade, a towel to mop the sweat, plenty of fans and just suck it up.

If building a little studio isn’t an option, you could consider a storage shed you could insulate and Ac.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

916 posts in 1969 days


#22 posted 07-13-2017 02:31 PM

Insulated everything in my former garage-converted to full-time shop. I do mean the whole works.

I have a window AC mounted in a northern wall, so no sun hits it. I just let it run with setting at about 74-76 deg F. I know it isn’t cheap to operate, but now the shop is comfortable and the things in it stay dry and don’t rapidly deteriorate in the TX coastal heat and humidity.

I also run two oscillating fans when I am in there. One more thing, I often let my ceiling-hung air filtration unit operate for a while even when there isn’t a dust problem, because it moves a surprising amount of air, and really gets the circulation going in there.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3985 posts in 2373 days


#23 posted 07-13-2017 02:38 PM

I am so glad to be retired and working in my air conditioned shop.

I worked in an electric furnace steelmaking shop. One would wear long johns and layers of protective clothing. Liquid steel temps over 3000 F and 125 tons of liquid steel make it really hot. The people who worked up close to it were amazingly tough.

View doubleG469's profile

doubleG469

812 posts in 829 days


#24 posted 07-13-2017 04:13 PM



Austin isn t quite as bad as your neck of the woods, but it gets hot and stays hot.

Mostly I work at night, stay hydrated, and dream of moving somewhere like Michigan or Ohio where the air is cool and I can get cherry, walnut, and maple for $2 bf from an Amish sawmill.

- Babieca

AMEN!

-- I refuse to edit the photo orientation for this website any longer. It’s an issue they should address and correct. Gary, Texas

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1448 posts in 1609 days


#25 posted 07-14-2017 04:10 PM

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2288 posts in 3329 days


#26 posted 07-14-2017 04:19 PM

I live in Desert Aire, Washington. Last several days were tame. Just before that, we got two 111 days. None of the news sources mention us, though we are the Death Valley of Washington.

Currently, my shop walls have six inch insulation, but no rock. The ceiling only has 3-1/2 and no rock, until I finish running 10 and 12 gauge circuits and detailing out the two light circuits.

I just got the insulation in last fall and it made a night and day difference (of course), even without the rock. I gained about 15 degrees in the winter, even without heat. I added a temporary, $5.00 240VAC heater in the overhead and I was, reasonably, good to go for the winter.

For the summer, I installed a temporary air conditioner. At 111, it kept the shop down to 89. When it felt hot, I just had to walk over to the house and back. Stepping in the shop felt like stepping into a sub zero.

Looking forward to sealing the place and getting the HVAC system up and going.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1406 posts in 3146 days


#27 posted 07-15-2017 07:05 PM

You should have experienced Atlanta, GA summers in the era before air conditioning like me. My youth was in the 1940s and 1950s. Getting dressed on summer mornings was quick. Just Jockey shorts and short pants! No shirt, no shoes. During the day I holed up in the relatively cool basement building model airplanes. I have to say one became “conditioned” to the heat and humidity a tad each day from May to the middle of June. Your body becomes more acclimated each day. Its still hot, but you don’t seem to feel it as much. Every room had and electric fan that helped, and we all slept with the windows open and listened to the night noises. Then in the late 1950s we had two rooms air conditioned, my parent’s bedroom and the den with the black and white television. Both were kept so cold you could have used them for meat lockers! But . . . when you left one of those rooms you REALLY felt the heat! When I bought my present home in the mid 1980s I made sure of two things. A huge dry basement and I upgraded the A/C to include the basement area. Now I have a great large shop and it actually stays a bit chilly in there during the summers as the main floor upstairs is kept cool where the family resides. As the colder air falls to the lowest level, the basement stays almost too cool.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1206 posts in 1924 days


#28 posted 07-15-2017 11:41 PM

I just had a mini-split installed and passed inspection on Friday. It’s night and day in difference (central FL, mind you). Right now though, I’m in cleaning and organizing mode since I had to move 1 side of my entire shop elsewhere for the electrical and unit install, so yeah, plus I have to finish the attic insulation tomorrow. Otherwise, it’s a wonderful feeling and worth the money.

View LDO2802's profile

LDO2802

167 posts in 815 days


#29 posted 07-20-2017 03:51 AM

I can’t really run the window mounted ac’s because California is a bunch of energy nazis on a tiered power system. If I run ac every day in addition to my pool pump, and my swamp cooler for he house, I get a four hundred dollar power bill. Once I move back to Idaho everything will be peachy. Since woodworking is 100% a hobby for me, I don’t do it if I am sweating my butt off. I would rather just do some carving inside

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

558 posts in 3342 days


#30 posted 07-20-2017 07:22 AM

Glad that I found this thread because it’s the opposite of the Siberian-like hell that vexes me and others up my way, I.e. winter. I’m in Michigan working outdoors or in a barely-heated garage, meaning that when winter really is kicking I surrender and stop working. Pretty sure that my activity on this site correlates inversely with local temperature. I heat the house, of course and am planning to use this to my advantage by completing a traditional workbench for my basement and then going power-tool free all winter in order to keep dust to a minimum. So, my advice to the OP is to follow my lead: adjust your projects and tools in a way that is suitable for working indoors and then retreat to the AC’d basement until the weather breaks.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5271 posts in 2694 days


#31 posted 07-20-2017 07:45 AM

I solved that problem by moving to Alaska in 1973. Got up to 55 today. I actually have the heat on in the shop today.

I have lived in hot country prior to moving to Alaska. I lived in Northern California Texas, Louisianan, and Oklahoma. I was smart enough to just drive through Arizona.

Did I say I’m not coming back!

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1406 posts in 3146 days


#32 posted 07-20-2017 12:47 PM

I’ve often wondered how you Alaskan guys can do it! I can tolerate hot weather, but I can’t stand really cold weather. It can get pretty cold here in Atlanta too in the winters. It is often around 15 to 25 degrees at night. It got down to 5 degrees below one night. But then one day in the late 1970s it was 105!!! I was crazy enough to go out into an open field and fly model airplanes that day. And our heat is with high humidity! None of the Arizona “dry heat”stuff.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

916 posts in 1969 days


#33 posted 07-20-2017 11:32 PM


I can t really run the window mounted ac s because California is a bunch of energy nazis on a tiered power system. If I run ac every day in addition to my pool pump, and my swamp cooler for he house, I get a four hundred dollar power bill. ...

- LDO2802

I’m snickering abut the CA energy nazis reference.
First off, my experience includes that state having nazis for everything (and now, for fun, read the current thread here http://lumberjocks.com/topics/230537 about possibly needing a license to be a furniture maker there).

And secondly, I would be super happy to only have a $400 energy bill. Here in Texas we have an open competition, unregulated power market, so the effect is that providers can contract to sell you power at whatever level they want.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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