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View dinu's profile

Removing rust from old hand tools

by dinu
posted 07-09-2017 04:19 PM


14 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17913 posts in 3392 days


#1 posted 07-09-2017 04:21 PM

Citric acid?

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Johnny7's profile

Johnny7

468 posts in 1476 days


#2 posted 07-09-2017 04:28 PM



Citric acid?

- chrisstef

Exactly!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7383 posts in 2584 days


#3 posted 07-09-2017 04:41 PM

Battery charger and some washing soda?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5272 posts in 2695 days


#4 posted 07-09-2017 04:42 PM

It seem like those video on electrolysis works pretty good. Never tried myself though.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

22934 posts in 3069 days


#5 posted 07-09-2017 05:44 PM

Brass wire wheels in the grinder, the drill press, and the Dremel…..and a bit of elbow grease…..seems to work for me….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2213 posts in 2415 days


#6 posted 07-09-2017 05:45 PM

Yep, look into electrolysis. I use a car battery charger but you can use a cell phone charger or any small dc charger you plug into the wall (but have to watch what the AMP output is).

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View dinu's profile

dinu

6 posts in 725 days


#7 posted 07-09-2017 09:30 PM

Thanks everyone for the advice.

Chris, what should be the dilution of citric acid? Is it safe to use on brass as well (I have few brass backed saws)? Does it leave any residue on the metal or does it give the bare metal surface? Is there any possibility of damaging the metal?

Brad, I read up a bit about electrolysis and while the method appears gentle on the metal there are some concerns/doubts. Can I use it on brass ? asking because brass is a copper alloy. I use a very small single car garage with no ventilation (once I close the front shutter) as my shop. The hydrogen formation seems a bit worrying if the process takes more than couple of hours & I have to leave the process unattended in my small shop.

Bandit, I don’t mind elbow grease but it would be elbow grease all the way for me :). I am a hobbyist with a very minimal set of tools and don’t own any of the tools you mentioned. I don’t mind the elbow grease but it would be nice if some of the work can be done a bit easier.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17913 posts in 3392 days


#8 posted 07-09-2017 09:38 PM

Citric will etch if you leave something in it for too long (say 12+ hours). I mix about 4 tablespoons in a gallon. Honestly i eyeball it. I like to soak then scrub a couple times over. Not sure about the brass. Some guys dont like it on saws, i personally dont mind it but i deal with red rust a lot where i live. Tough stuff.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14358 posts in 4483 days


#9 posted 07-09-2017 09:55 PM

Related to Saw plates, I would check in the saw thread. You would want to be careful of the etch on the blade.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14358 posts in 4483 days


#10 posted 07-09-2017 09:56 PM

And related to brass, I would remove the brass and clean separately.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

432 posts in 2306 days


#11 posted 07-09-2017 11:07 PM

Google shopsmith rust potato, say it works, would be cheap.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

22934 posts in 3069 days


#12 posted 07-09-2017 11:19 PM

Have a drill? Chuck the wire wheels into the drill…be sure to reverse it now and then…..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7383 posts in 2584 days


#13 posted 07-09-2017 11:48 PM

Brad, I read up a bit about electrolysis and while the method appears gentle on the metal there are some concerns/doubts. Can I use it on brass ? asking because brass is a copper alloy. I use a very small single car garage with no ventilation (once I close the front shutter) as my shop. The hydrogen formation seems a bit worrying if the process takes more than couple of hours & I have to leave the process unattended in my small shop.
- dinu

Brass cleans up nicely using electrolysis. And the hydrogen produced is a non-issue… there is so little produced, and it is almost instantly harmlessly dissipated into the atmosphere as soon as the tiny bubble bursts. In fact, it’s pretty fun to pop them with one of those long nose grill lighters :) Just as long as you don’t cover the container, there is absolutely no worry (and even then, it’s minimal). If you do want to produce hydrogen to use, google HHO (Browns Gas) generators. They make fantastic torches and sources for alternative heating, and can be powered by solar cells. The torches are awesome and don’t get hot, but can melt lava rock, glass, stainless steel and even tungsten (melting point of over 6000°F)!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View dinu's profile

dinu

6 posts in 725 days


#14 posted 07-10-2017 08:27 PM

I would probably end up trying all the methods to see what I like best. I would likely try with citric acid and abrasives (wire wheels/sandpaper) first as those would need least investment and move on to electrolysis later. Thanks a lot for the help.

Wayne, the saw thread is a great place, I would probably spend days going thru it.

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