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View HuntleyBill's profile

Recomendations for carving with my CNC

by HuntleyBill
posted 06-07-2017 09:10 PM


40 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1203 days


#1 posted 06-08-2017 01:36 AM

You are going to have to be very talented indeed to recreate an image like that in 3-D no matter what software you are using. The only way I would be able to do it is to use a 3-D scanner.

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#2 posted 06-08-2017 02:43 AM

Thank you Art. Autodesk Artcam can do this if you can afford $360 a year. The tutorial to complete that exact dog took 20 min. Problem is, I’m not a professional shop. I do this as a hobby for friends and family. $369 is kinda steep for us hobbyists.

So, I was hoping there was an alternative.

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12802 posts in 2767 days


#3 posted 06-08-2017 02:54 AM

Shows $180/yr for me but that is no doubt a sale price. You’d just have to charge a nominal fee to cover the cost of the software. You’ll also have wear and tear on your router, router bits. And I bet, once your friends show people you’ll be swamped in requests.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#4 posted 06-08-2017 04:27 AM

that is correct Rick $180 for the fist year and $360 after that.
So…are there no other alternatives? No other software can do what I am looking to do?

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7484 posts in 3755 days


#5 posted 06-08-2017 06:02 AM

It might take some steep learning but I understand that Fusion 360, free from Autodesk, could do this!
I watched one of the tutorials where the did a relief of California.

Google ”3D carving with Fusion 360” and you will see many examples!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#6 posted 06-08-2017 02:20 PM

Thank you old novice. I have Fusion 360. You are right that it can 3d carve. A lot of software does. The part I am having a challenge with is finding software that converts a 2d photograph into a file that can be imported into Fusion and carved out on my CNC without having to spend a fortune.

So far, I have not been able to find anything.

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1805 posts in 1602 days


#7 posted 06-08-2017 06:35 PM

You may want to post this inquiry on the “Vetric” forum.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

300 posts in 1861 days


#8 posted 06-08-2017 08:36 PM

I think that Vectric Aspire may do what you want.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#9 posted 06-08-2017 08:53 PM

Yes, Vetric Aspire might do it but as I stated previously. Aspire is a $2000 program.
Not exactly feasible for the hobbyist.
I don’t mind having to pay for software but that is a little over the top for me.

What I was hoping to learn here was if there are less expensive alternatives. If anyone else has done what I want to do and what software they use.

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1805 posts in 1602 days


#10 posted 06-08-2017 09:20 PM

GW- Aspire will do what he wants. Aspire is not a “point and shoot” as what I see that he wants. Aside from the cost there is a steep learning curve in making a 3-d model.
Again I suggest that this question go to the Vetric forum for the advice that he seeks.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12802 posts in 2767 days


#11 posted 06-08-2017 10:22 PM

This looks to be fairly sophisticated programming, I doubt you are going to find a cheap or free version.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7484 posts in 3755 days


#12 posted 06-09-2017 12:03 AM

HuntleyBill, I understand now!
Yes, there is a web site that can take photos and convert them to STL files!
Google photo to STL file and you will find a number of resources including resolution, online and/or a downloaded application.
I have only used one (don’t remember which one) for a low resolution carving.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#13 posted 06-09-2017 01:35 AM

Thank you oldnovice. I will check this out. This sounds like a good alternative.

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1805 posts in 1602 days


#14 posted 06-09-2017 01:39 AM

I did the Google search- from what I gathered- Yes but the mesh files created are for 3d Prtinters. I have yet to see how this works for a CNC model. Please expand more-
Respectfully,
Another option is go to “Turbo Squid” and for a fee purchase an individual model- there are many dog models and they even have “Pres Trump” models- just an aside.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#15 posted 06-09-2017 01:46 AM

Thank you Desert. The idea is to convert a picture on MY dog or YOUR dog. Getting a downloaded dog/cat/bird/goat/whatever is not personalized. People want THEIR dog, not a downloaded clip art version of the breed.

Does this make better sense?

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1805 posts in 1602 days


#16 posted 06-09-2017 01:58 AM

Yes sir it does- I have been at this for 5 years using Aspire, and I and others would like a “point and shoot” as easy as the litho’s but a personalized 3-d model. I look forward to getting “informed”. I believe what you want is/was has been spoken about on the Vetric forum-” no go” as they say. Hopefully someone on LJ might be able to enlighten us.
Respectfully

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1086 posts in 3518 days


#17 posted 06-25-2017 01:56 AM


Autodesk Artcam can do this if you can afford $360 a year. The tutorial to complete that exact dog took 20 min.

ArtCAM has the tools for YOU to do this. And while the tutorial took 20 minutes, it could take you years to get good enough to achieve the same results.
This is one of the most common questions asked by new CNC users.
The answer is that it takes considerable skill to create 3D reliefs. There are a handful of programs designed for creating 3D reliefs, and all are quite expensive.
If you have the skills to do this, it can be done in just about any 3D program, even one of the many freely available ones. Blender is one such program. Free, and incredibly powerful. With a learning curve steeper than ArtCAM or Aspire.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1805 posts in 1602 days


#18 posted 06-25-2017 03:22 AM


Autodesk Artcam can do this if you can afford $360 a year. The tutorial to complete that exact dog took 20 min.

ArtCAM has the tools for YOU to do this. And while the tutorial took 20 minutes, it could take you years to get good enough to achieve the same results.
This is one of the most common questions asked by new CNC users.
The answer is that it takes considerable skill to create 3D reliefs. There are a handful of programs designed for creating 3D reliefs, and all are quite expensive.
If you have the skills to do this, it can be done in just about any 3D program, even one of the many freely available ones. Blender is one such program. Free, and incredibly powerful. With a learning curve steeper than ArtCAM or Aspire.

- Ger21

Amen.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View OG51's profile

OG51

153 posts in 498 days


#19 posted 02-23-2018 03:59 PM

Sorry, late to the party. Have you looked into lithophanes. Way easier than trying to carve 3d reliefs from 2d images.

I looked into this after I got my cnc. There is no easy way to get a “high quality” cnc pattern from a 2d image typically. A lot of caveats there.

There are different techniques on converting 2d images to 3d objects. The challenge with any of these techniques is a 2d image is missing a key component for 3d objects and that is the height component. Our eyes and brains create the illusion of height from a 2d image. The cnc software does not have that capacity. It normally creates a grey scale which is then used to extrapolate height based on the a grey scale from 0 to 1.

The other option is to use several pictures of a subject at different angles. There is software that can create a point cloud based on the differences in the angles from key discernible points on the picture. You can then take the point cloud and create a mesh from it and then save to either obj. or stl. format for carving.

Both of these methods do give you something to work with but they will require clean up of the mesh. Sometimes (rarely) you do get a mesh that is good enough that no clean up is required. It all depends on the quality of the resulting cnc pattern.

The last method I know of is to use the image as a reference only and to sculpt the object in 3d space. This is where a skilled 3d artist is needed. I have a friend to creates 3d renders of 2d company logos. I assumed he was taking the pictures and using the first method but when I asked him his workflow he told me that he always recreates them in 3d. He said the results are just way cleaner by starting from scratch.

The other areas to research are bas relief techniques and depth maps.

View gkas's profile

gkas

11 posts in 2627 days


#20 posted 05-29-2018 09:41 AM

Autodesk ArtCAM is no longer available.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1325 posts in 2423 days


#21 posted 05-29-2018 10:40 AM

Autodesk killed ArtCAM? Wow. I figured it was coming, just not so soon…

If you couldn’t afford ArtCAM, at $360 a year for the standard version ($3500 for the pro version) then I don’t know what to suggest. After Autodesk bought it, it was the most affordable of all of the 3D modeling softwares that I am familiar with. It used to be $10k per seat!

Vectric Aspire was the next most affordable at $2000.

Rhino is another alternative, but still not affordable by your criteria, at about $1600.

Carvewright uses its own proprietary software which is modular so you only buy the packages you want, but even their 3D modules are $2-300 each. Plus you have to have their machine which is over $2000 now.

So, I don’t know what to tell you if $360/year seems out of reach… It doesn’t really seem out of reachto me. Especially for a hobbyist with a CNC machine. You’ve certainly spent more than that on the tooling and machine.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View sparkie113's profile

sparkie113

23 posts in 3777 days


#22 posted 05-29-2018 10:42 AM

V Carve Pro from Vetric should be able to do it. It may take some time playing with it but you can download a trial copy for free.
They are very good in support help and have video on how to do different things.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1581 posts in 3454 days


#23 posted 05-29-2018 04:40 PM

ok saw this post was from 2017, but I’m going to respond to the laast posts.

you could get a software and do the learning curve or go to fivr.com, post your photo and a ton of people will respond offering to do this for you for (on average) 5-15 bucks. I’ll pay for that. They do it quick and cheap and you move on.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#24 posted 05-29-2018 04:47 PM

Thank you bonesbra, I tried going to fivr.com and all I get it Charleston area chamber of commerce. I like your solution if I can get the right website.

Amen about the liberals comment!!!! :-)

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View Frank's profile

Frank

15 posts in 825 days


#25 posted 05-29-2018 09:25 PM



Thank you bonesbra, I tried going to fivr.com and all I get it Charleston area chamber of commerce. I like your solution if I can get the right website.

Amen about the liberals comment!!!! :-)

- HuntleyBill

It’s fiverr.com , just in case.

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#26 posted 05-30-2018 01:21 AM

OK…Got the website. Now if you can tell me what it is called that I want to do, I may be able to got to the correct source. Lots of stuff going on at this website!

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1581 posts in 3454 days


#27 posted 05-30-2018 01:35 PM



OK…Got the website. Now if you can tell me what it is called that I want to do, I may be able to got to the correct source. Lots of stuff going on at this website!

- HuntleyBill


sorry for the mistype on the site!

under graphic design look at 3d models.

or you can do a search for stl files, or what ever file type you want. I use stl that’s the easiest. Although the last gudy i did work with sent me the dwg’s as well.

They will generally give you a couple mods with the first send. I know my guy that did mine, did not have the right solution, but that was due to my bad description. Once I clarified my need, he provided the right file. I paid 15 bucks.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3405 posts in 1775 days


#28 posted 05-30-2018 02:12 PM

Old thread revived…
Never done it myself, since I don’t have a CNC, but as I was researching for the eventual CNC I want to build, I stumbled upon this instructable for converting a 2D image to a 3D model using a script for purposes of carving with a CNC. You can probably skip the first 5 steps or so if you already know how to use F360. You may have to first do some manipulation of the image to get more contrast or even take a picture with better shadows, if the pet is still around. Might be worth a try. Let us know if you do!

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1325 posts in 2423 days


#29 posted 05-30-2018 03:34 PM

Generating a 3D model on the cheap is all well and good, but what software are you using to generate toolpaths for that 3D model once you get it?

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7484 posts in 3755 days


#30 posted 05-30-2018 06:50 PM

Underdog, typically you have two tool path choices and multiple bits in volved, roughing bits, tapered ball end mill(s) of different sizes depending on the level of detail.

With Fusion 360 you can see the results of the various bit from roughing to all subsequent passes.

I can do the same with my Shopbot and the very, very simple program supplied by Shopbot and I believe is a really scaled down piece from Vetric.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1325 posts in 2423 days


#31 posted 05-30-2018 07:15 PM

OldNovice,
I realize that. I’m familiar with ArtCAM, Aspire, Rhino, Cabinet Vision, CabnetWare, AlphaCAM, and RouterCIM.
Each and every one of them have a CAD aspect and a CAM aspect.
What I’m asking is NOT how these programs generate the toolpath. I know how they do it.

What I’m asking IS… how is the OP (Bill Huntley) going to process his 3D model into toolpaths once someone else makes it for him?
I mean, what software does HE have that he can use to create those toolpaths? Just having a model isn’t going to do him any good unless he can generate toolpaths for his model somehow.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#32 posted 05-30-2018 09:48 PM

OHHH, I understand what your asking.

CAMBAM. It can do tool changes and it was a LOT easier to learn that Fusion 360. I know Fusion is loaded with features and can do a lot but the bad news is Fusion is loaded with features and can do a lot!!

Cambam (at least for me) is easier to use. It is NOT free like Fusion is for hobbyists etc but Cambam also is a one time fee and not an annual renewal.

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#33 posted 05-30-2018 09:52 PM

If you know of something better/easier, I’d love your input.

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1325 posts in 2423 days


#34 posted 05-30-2018 09:55 PM

Ok good. So you do have software that will import 3D models and generate toolpaths.

That must be what you wound up with after you asked this question way back when? What’s the cost for CAMBAM?

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#35 posted 05-30-2018 10:06 PM

Yes…after reading what others were saying and trying out several recommended software trials, I settled on Cambam. The cost is $149 US and I have had a lot of luck using the forums. They actually answer you (just like Lumberjocks).

A lot of people use Fusion 360 because it is a cad and cam program. They advertise it as “easy to use”, “easy to learn” but it wasn’t for me. The learning curve is much steeper than stand alone Cam programs. Maybe I don’t have the patience needed.

I never saw a plugging or script for converting images over for carving. Maybe I should give that a look see.

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

118 posts in 3477 days


#36 posted 05-30-2018 10:31 PM

Ahhhhh….turns out that 2D image to 3D for CNC is more toward engraving and does not do anything with taking a photograph and converting it over to Carve on the CNC.

Oh well!

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7484 posts in 3755 days


#37 posted 05-31-2018 05:48 PM

Underdog, sorry if I “insulted” I misread the original question and replied in error to your responses to to OP!

I don’t know if this link to instructables was mentioned above but it provides a step by step process for converting 2D to 3D with Fusion 360 all the way to CAM.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1325 posts in 2423 days


#38 posted 05-31-2018 07:34 PM

OldNovice,
No worries. I was just clarifying. Appreciate the sentiments though. In a text-only environment, it’s too easy to misread or offend…

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View OG51's profile

OG51

153 posts in 498 days


#39 posted 06-09-2018 10:10 PM

Look at Normal map/Displacement map software. It is a way to create the depth component for cnc patterns.

I have only gotten limited success using them but sometimes you do get lucky.

You will need to post process the image to smooth them out typically.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7484 posts in 3755 days


#40 posted 06-10-2018 08:35 PM

The free Terrain2STL Web site allows you to move about the U.S. and select a region and size to get an STL file that you can use with almost CNC any carving program.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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