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Trying to build my first Garage woodshop

by AstroEd
posted 05-25-2017 08:24 PM


42 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4259 days


#1 posted 05-25-2017 09:07 PM

The stuff you’re thinking about getting will
set you up for furniture and cabinetmaking
but that’s not necessary for making boxes
and small things.

If you’re not out to build cabinetry for your
home or for clients you might not need the
capacity to process large panels of plywood.

For working solid wood the 3 most important
machines, imo, are the planer, jointer and
band saw. Then drill press, router table
and table saw. A bench top drill press is
fine and a router table is easy to make from
a scrap of melamine or a sink cutout. If
not making cabinets large rip and crosscut
capacity on the table saw isn’t needed. I’d
say the one you have will be fine.

A 6” jointer, a 13” planer and a 14” band saw
can all run on the 110v power you have.

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

259 posts in 1681 days


#2 posted 05-25-2017 09:15 PM

Don’t underestimate the value of used tools. But, since you have a Grizzly in the same town, I can imagine that it’s hard not to just buy the new one, or one from their excellent tent sales. Wish it was around when I lived there. OP Hardwoods used to be an excellent place to shop for hardwood lumber and plywood. I’m wondering if it’s still there?

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

182 posts in 1023 days


#3 posted 05-25-2017 09:24 PM

Edward, have you considered a used Shopsmith, the 5 in one tool that many have started on. That was my first woodworking piece of machinery (still have it, and in fact just used the accesory bandsaw on it it about 30 minutes ago), and from there, I decided what else I needed (I got a separate Delta contractor’stable saw and an Enlon jointer in addition to the Shopsmith). Some people only have the Shopmith, and do not feel the need to supplement it with other machinery. If you are not familiar with the Shopsmith, it is a table saw, a drill press, a horizontal bore, a disc sander and a lathe in the basic form. You can visit the Shopsmith website for demonstration videos and details.

The Shopsmith would be perfect for limited space. As I understand your post, your portion of the space is only about 6.5 feet wide. You can get them used in good condition for very little money. I’ve seen them as low as $200. A good set up with an additional bandsaw attachment might go for around $500. For under $1000. you can get even more attachments like a belt sander, jointer or strip sander, all made by Shopsmith. Of course, you could always buy new.

On the other hand, if you have the room for them, nothing wrong with stand alone machinery. Grizzly is a fine choice.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1386 days


#4 posted 05-25-2017 09:25 PM

I want a jointer and a bandsaw.

That would be awesome.

But my wife thinks garages should involve cars sometimes.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

610 posts in 1230 days


#5 posted 05-25-2017 09:54 PM

I’ve moved my shop around the country about 5 times. Sometimes as small as yours, sometimes much larger. As I’m not done moving yet, I keep all my tools at 110V. Can’t see upgrading the electrical system in a place I’ll sell in 4 or 5 years. What I have learned is that a couple of outlets on different circuits is adequate. I was using my shop vac for dust collection off my table saw for a while and quickly learned that they had to be on different circuits or I’d trip breakers. In one of my shops, that meant I had to run an extension cord into the kitchen to catch a separate circuit outlet when I needed to run the saw.
Other than that, a one man hobby shop rarely uses more than one corded tool at a time.
Resign yourself to the fact that you’ll never have a fully set up shop and start making sawdust. Accumulate tools as you need them. I’m moving more to hand tools these days. It’s a much more peaceful process that way.

-- Sawdust Maker

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#6 posted 05-25-2017 11:05 PM

OP hardwoods is still going strong, I recently went there to buy some wood carving supplies only to discover I did not care for wood carving as much as wood burning.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View tmasondarnell's profile

tmasondarnell

119 posts in 2400 days


#7 posted 05-25-2017 11:07 PM

Well, I will jump in.

I am just a hobbyist and build small boxes.

IMHO, I would hold off on the drill press and the scroll saw. You can go a very long time without either of them.

Buy your table saw, jointer and planer as your first tools (if you have $ left, then get the band saw). I have gone a very long way with only those three big tools (+ the Harbor Freight DC)

Get a 6 or 8 inch planer. While the width may not be as critical, the length of the planer beds is. If you think about a basic 9×5 box with continuous grain on the sides, you will need to take they out of a 36” board (at least). That board will be much easier to join on a jointer with a longer infeed and out feed bed than the small 4” table top unit.

Buy a decent router.

Get the mobile bases and put everything you can on wheels.

For a work bench, I would suggest building using the process the wood whisper used for the out feed table:

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/tablesaw-outfeed-table/

It is out of plywood you can get at the BORG and I have built two that are rock solid (at least for small projects).

View Rich's profile

Rich

5156 posts in 1200 days


#8 posted 05-25-2017 11:37 PM



I want a jointer and a bandsaw.

That would be awesome.

But my wife thinks garages should involve cars sometimes.

- gargey

My ex-wife thought the same thing.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2606 days


#9 posted 05-26-2017 03:58 PM

If you are making small projects you probably won’t work with thick or wide stock very often. So don’t worry about a 220V table saw or anything else. A 1.5hp model will do you fine.

For a jointer, the grizzly 6” bench top served me very well for years in projects up to the size of a small coffee table. I think it was less than 300 bucks at the time. If you can find a floor standing 6” model for near the same price, and you have the floor space, I would do that. Lots of people find them on Craigslist, but I was never that lucky.

The DW744 planer, or any lunchbox type will do as well. More expensive machines may be wider, but you don’t need the with for what you plan to build.

A standard 14” bandsaw would be good too. I have the Shop Fox version of the Grizzly 555 series. I have seen them new for less than 600 bucks if you have a Shopfox outlet near by.

Get a good router set, one with a plunge base and fixed base, and then make your own router table. It’s not hard to make a simple one.

I agree drill presses are nice, but optional. Honestly, I would start with the Harbor Freight bench top type. 80 bucks and you can find a coupon. One served me great for years. I built the telescope in my projects with it. I have a laser on my newer craftsman, but it goes unused the vast majority of the time. Also not sure I can see the need for a digital readout.

Hope those thoughts help.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2262 posts in 2640 days


#10 posted 05-26-2017 04:04 PM

You could easily purchase all of those items 50%-75% cheaper via craigslist and even more so at local auctions.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View rodneywt1180b's profile

rodneywt1180b

185 posts in 997 days


#11 posted 05-26-2017 04:38 PM

If you’re mechanically inclined at all used tools are a great value. Most of my shop is vintage machines that I restored.
The used ShopSmith one guy above me mentioned is also a good investment. I’ve never used mine as a tablesaw but I love the drill press feature and disk sander plus they’re ok lathes. Being a multi tool there are some trade offs but overall they’re well designed and well built tools.
If all you’re interested in is smaller projects it’s worth considering going with mostly hand tools with a band saw.

I recommend building your own work bench. It’s actually one of the most important tools in a shop. It doesn’t have to be fancy, just sturdy and flat. Solid core doors make good bench tops.

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1202 days


#12 posted 05-26-2017 05:15 PM


If you are making small projects you probably won t work with thick or wide stock very often. So don t worry about a 220V table saw or anything else. A 1.5hp model will do you fine.
- bbasiaga

It is not about power. Good cabinet saws rarely come in less than 3HP. 1.5 HP saws usually come in hybrid setups, which has many shortcomings besides the power.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2606 days


#13 posted 05-26-2017 07:32 PM

I’d still argue that for cutting up to 8/4 stock a hybrid type saw in the 500 buck range is fully serviceable. I only upgraded my portable saw when my projects got bigger and heavier, and I needed a Dado stack.

3hp cabinet saw us much nicer, but overkill for a guy starting out and on a budget. Just my opinion.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5156 posts in 1200 days


#14 posted 05-26-2017 08:38 PM

I know, Brian. I sure wish someone had told me I couldn’t rip 8/4 boards with a 1-3/4 hp saw before I went and built those exterior doors using it.

It’s been discussed on here often, but a thin kerf 24 tooth rip blade will enable all but the weakest saws to cut 8/4 hardwood effortlessly.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1386 days


#15 posted 05-26-2017 08:57 PM

Believe it or not, I’ve heard it can even be done with a hand saw.

View DS's profile

DS

3360 posts in 3031 days


#16 posted 05-26-2017 09:03 PM

Edward, There are lot of great ideas in this thread. Ultimately, it comes down to YOU and the projects you want to make. When I was putting my first shop together, I let the projects dictate the tools.

I never bought a tool “just to have it”. There was always a purpose for that tool. Otherwise, there is never enough money, or space to deal with things that aren’t immediately useful. Usually, I would let the project proceeds pay for part, or most, of the new tools’ cost to purchase.

On the electricity side of things, it is less about “how many outlets” than “how many circuits” you have. (A single circuit is everything that is attached to a single circuit breaker or fuse in the main box.)

Modern homes typically have GFI outlets in the garage that are sometimes shared with other outlets around the house.
I have this issue in my garage. However, in my case, there is at least ONE dedicated 110V 20A circuit that is ONLY in the garage on a single outlet. I know I can put more on that circuit without the risk of popping a breaker than the others. (The wife’s hair dryer at the same time as the TS trips every time)

Also, the wire gauge used in your house wiring will determine if you have 15A circuits (14 Gauge wire) or 20A circuits (12 Gauge Wire). Do not to exceed this load (for the entire circuit) when running your tools.

Flipping off circuit breakers one at a time and checking outlets for power is an easy way to do a quick survey of all your circuits to find out what you have in your garage.

Good luck, and happy woodworking!

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#17 posted 05-26-2017 09:26 PM

Well currently projects will be shaped wood blanks for wood burning, Scroll Saw projects of unknown style at this time. I was asked to make some garden markers for a friend and trying to decide between wood burning the letters or buying a router set and learning to use it. Also liked the idea of a pantorouter.
I tried to design it in Cut2D trial version sadly it won’t print out to the size I designed it which was 6” x 4”. But it is a start. Looking now at several other software in the hopes I can print the templates to size in one of them.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View DS's profile

DS

3360 posts in 3031 days


#18 posted 05-26-2017 10:31 PM

Maybe look into Laser Engraving the letters?
Somewhere here on LJ’s there is a link to a <$150 laser engraving kit using basic software.

(Edited to add the link and revise the cost estimate once I found it.)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View htl's profile

htl

4873 posts in 1770 days


#19 posted 05-26-2017 11:29 PM

For the small models and some boxes I build what you have now will get er done just fine.
Look at my projects page and all were done with what you have all ready bought plus a sears 12” band saw.
I need to do all my work sitting down so have every thing set for a siting position.
The only tool I need to buy is a scroll saw where my Harbor Freight died of over work.
Work with what you have now and buy more as needed not what you think you will need.
A lot will depend on which direction you wood working takes you.
So looks like you’ve got the basics now learn the safe way to use what you have.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View htl's profile

htl

4873 posts in 1770 days


#20 posted 05-26-2017 11:32 PM

“I tried to design it in Cut2D trial version sadly it won’t print out to the size I designed it which was 6” x 4”. But it is a start. Looking now at several other software in the hopes I can print the templates to size in one of them.”

Looks like you did a nice sign, now couldn’t you enlarge it by setting your printer-coper to make it bigger or take it to Staples and they’ll do it for a small bit a $$$.
Just my $.02

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View steve104c's profile

steve104c

52 posts in 1849 days


#21 posted 05-27-2017 12:13 AM

Table saw is very important. Just remember, the G0771Z or the G715P is either 110-volt or 220-volt. When you are able to wire your garage with 220-v you will have a nice table saw you can use now and convert later to 220v. I visited a professional woodworking shop the other day and the owner had several Grizzly products and was very pleased with them. Steve.

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#22 posted 05-27-2017 05:58 AM

Great projects you have done, I can not even dream of doing such skillful things.


For the small models and some boxes I build what you have now will get er done just fine.
Look at my projects page and all were done with what you have all ready bought plus a sears 12” band saw.
I need to do all my work sitting down so have every thing set for a siting position.
The only tool I need to buy is a scroll saw where my Harbor Freight died of over work.
Work with what you have now and buy more as needed not what you think you will need.
A lot will depend on which direction you wood working takes you.
So looks like you ve got the basics now learn the safe way to use what you have.

- htl


-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#23 posted 05-27-2017 06:01 AM

I just expected it to print at the size I created them in.


“I tried to design it in Cut2D trial version sadly it won’t print out to the size I designed it which was 6” x 4”. But it is a start. Looking now at several other software in the hopes I can print the templates to size in one of them.”

Looks like you did a nice sign, now couldn t you enlarge it by setting your printer-coper to make it bigger or take it to Staples and they ll do it for a small bit a $$$.
Just my $.02

- htl


-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View htl's profile

htl

4873 posts in 1770 days


#24 posted 05-27-2017 06:08 PM

OH! and I forgot to add that I just used one plug in the garage for all my tools to start with.
I just use one tool at a time so how are you going to over tax it for one or more tools at a time.
Later I started using my small shop vac with a diy cyclone and some extra lights so plugged into another plug on a different circuit and all was good.
That’s one of the pluses to using the smaller light duty tools.

Quote ”Great projects you have done, I can not even dream of doing such skillful things.”
If you look at my first projects shown they were much simpler but in the two or so years since I’ve been on here I’ve just kept trying new things and it surprises me whats come out of my little garage shop.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2782 posts in 3533 days


#25 posted 05-28-2017 12:13 PM

I make and sell hundreds of small keepsake boxes, every year for nine years now. I started with garage workshop like yours but have since moved to a different set up. I installed a wall to separate out, one stall of a three car garage. I added lots of outlets by mounting conduit and boxes, to the surface of the walls. The tools I use to make the boxes are scroll saw, band saw, table saw, jointer, stationary sander 8”x48”, air compressor, and a router. I also have a drill press. I make cedar boxes 8”x6”x3” with lettering or images inlaid into the hinged lids. (Double bevel inlay) I resaw all my wood to 3/8” so I have a band saw with 12” height capacity. In order to make your workbench stable, secure it to a wall. My shop is all 120 volts except for a 240 volt dust collector that I have in a separate building now. Attached is a photo of boxes I make.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#26 posted 05-29-2017 02:09 AM

I have seen your wonderful items before, I can only dream of such things, so. Ugh to learn. I just returned my unopened Ryobi Scrollsaw, circular saw, shop radio, and will put that $500 toward a Dewalt DW788 or Seyco ST-21 Scrollsaw. Also trying to decide between two drill press machines they are both 14” 12-speed but one is benchtop and much cheaper but I wonder if floor model will be more stable. I am very interested in Intarsia, Text art signs with the smaller script text inside of a larger text. And fret work boxes but as I said lots to learn. Will also get a 6” benchtop jointer and a Dewalt benchtop planer that should take care of me for some time.


I make and sell hundreds of small keepsake boxes, every year for nine years now. I started with garage workshop like yours but have since moved to a different set up. I installed a wall to separate out, one stall of a three car garage. I added lots of outlets by mounting conduit and boxes, to the surface of the walls. The tools I use to make the boxes are scroll saw, band saw, table saw, jointer, stationary sander 8”x48”, air compressor, and a router. I also have a drill press. I make cedar boxes 8”x6”x3” with lettering or images inlaid into the hinged lids. (Double bevel inlay) I resaw all my wood to 3/8” so I have a band saw with 12” height capacity. In order to make your workbench stable, secure it to a wall. My shop is all 120 volts except for a 240 volt dust collector that I have in a separate building now. Attached is a photo of boxes I make.

- Jim Finn


-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View htl's profile

htl

4873 posts in 1770 days


#27 posted 05-29-2017 02:04 PM

The nice part to having two of any tool is being able to leave one set up for those mass produced parts.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2782 posts in 3533 days


#28 posted 05-29-2017 09:49 PM

Htl…..yes exactly. I have one scroll saw set up at about a two degree angle to do all the inlays and another set to 90° to use to make toys. (I have another in reserve under my bench.) I have two 6×48 stationary belt sanders, one with a fine sanding belt on it and one coarser. I find I almost never use the fine one though. I have two double bevel 12” sliding compound miter saws. One in my shop and one in my wood storage building.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

View htl's profile

htl

4873 posts in 1770 days


#29 posted 05-29-2017 10:05 PM

Now we’re not saying to go out and buy two of any thing but once you get the demand for you boxes or what ever a whole different train of thought kicks in and you start making 5 10 ?? of every part at one time, really saves on the set up time, but you really have to get organized or things can get complicated in a hurry.
The big thing is have fun, and learn learn learn.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View Rich's profile

Rich

5156 posts in 1200 days


#30 posted 05-29-2017 10:10 PM


Now we’re not saying to go out and buy two of any thing

That would be very foolish. Three is a minimum.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#31 posted 05-30-2017 07:19 AM

That is Military thinking. Everything in triplicate.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View AlexRobinson's profile

AlexRobinson

3 posts in 972 days


#32 posted 05-30-2017 12:48 PM

cool, good idea, wish you good luck :D

-- [url=https://huge-it.com/wordpress-photo-gallery/]WordPress Photo Gallery[/url] -[url=https://wordpress.org/plugins/slider/]Responsive Slider[/url]

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#33 posted 05-30-2017 05:52 PM

The only tool I am considering to double up on is the scroll saw one locked into 45° angle for bowls one for everything else.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View rodneywt1180b's profile

rodneywt1180b

185 posts in 997 days


#34 posted 05-31-2017 01:52 AM

Better to have one very good scroll saw than two mediocre ones. Tilting the table isn’t that hard even on vintage ones like mine.
But generally I agree with the two (or three or more) is better than one philosophy of tool ownership.

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

View htl's profile

htl

4873 posts in 1770 days


#35 posted 05-31-2017 10:08 AM

I would think that most who have two of any tool [high$$$] just needed a better one or found a deal they couldn’t pass up, and we are talking about a one person shop here.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View rodneywt1180b's profile

rodneywt1180b

185 posts in 997 days


#36 posted 06-03-2017 01:30 AM

I like vintage tools and I’m a bottom feeder so all of mine were good deals even after the cost of rebuilding them. I have duplicates for no better reason than there was something I liked about them and the price was right. I’ve bought enough lower quality tools after I already had a better one that I can’t claim it’s always an upgrade. There’s everything from trash to treasure in the vintage tool world too.
On a more practical note, if you’re doing production runs it’s nice to be able to set up a tool for a job and leave it that way.
It looks like the OP does a lot of scroll saw work so a high quality scroll saw would be a good investment. Maybe later a second one dedicated to angle cuts would be good.
Rodney

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

View htl's profile

htl

4873 posts in 1770 days


#37 posted 06-03-2017 02:00 AM

That’s the thing every wood worker is better at something than others so his projects will gravitate toward those thing he’s good at, and because of this finds more enjoyable in making them.
Because of this no one can say what your shop has to have only you and the wood can tell you which tools are needed for you shop.
I would think that once you have an idea which way your going check out those builder and see what tools they use the most, and that’s one of the pluses of this site there’s a lot of different work being show cased here.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#38 posted 06-05-2017 01:15 AM

Well my $3,000 budget turned into a $5,600 credit card bill lol, but I have my wood shop, just need to finish cleaning garage so I can set it all up. 3 items are on back order.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#39 posted 06-05-2017 01:24 AM

Strange question but when at the a Grizzly tent sale they had a Scroller demoing the Dewalt 788 he had it tilted forward on a block and his foot controller on a bucket I understand the reason, but then I got to thinking… what the best chair for scrolling? A Stool, A chair with back or lumbar support, A Lazyboy?

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#40 posted 09-05-2017 08:56 AM

Long time no post. I have been nursing some injuries and finally making some progress on my future wood shop. Still a bit to clean up and now hoping to add a small wood Lathe to try my hand at turning pens. (made my first pen at the Scrollsaw and woodworking Trade show in Dubuque Iowa a few weeks ago. I have a lot of cleaning up in the garage still am waiting for a 10’x16’ storage shed to be put up in back yard.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

248 posts in 1144 days


#41 posted 09-05-2017 10:02 AM

I think, it is good to dream.
But, you have some tools. they may not be what you would like to have, but you have them.

Explore them. just how far can you push them. No, they were not made to do the things you want to use them to do, but they will do it.

You don’t have to spend a boatload of money all at once. The tent sale is good, but look at used also. hand tools and power tools, can be found in many places. find them and then brag and make us jealous.

The point is to have fun and make things.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

45 posts in 986 days


#42 posted 11-18-2019 02:32 AM

I have been away for a long time, I have not made much with my now almost $7,000 in tools either due to health, deaths in Family and plain laziness. But I recently lost my Service dog and can not afford another one so getting off my tail to finish the wood shop in the hopes I can earn enough income to eventually afford his replacement.

Gonna try intersecting word-art signs first on my scroll saw. (Wonder if they can be done on a CNC…..) like this. I need to make the space between script and large words a bit larger though.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

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