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All Replies on Pergola post cap collar?

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View logwolf's profile

Pergola post cap collar?

by logwolf
posted 04-20-2017 04:28 PM


17 replies so far

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23392 posts in 3130 days


#1 posted 04-20-2017 04:31 PM

Cut one piece a little bigger than needed, work it until it fits the way you want it…..and use it as a pattern to make the rest of the pieces.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 1349 days


#2 posted 04-20-2017 04:39 PM

ana white huh?

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2939 posts in 1387 days


#3 posted 04-20-2017 05:10 PM

Personally, I think it looks better without the base on the posts. And if I did, I’d make them lower that the window sills – maybe 12” lower. I would just trim off the posts at the bottom to close off the opening at the deck. But it’s your pergola, so obviously it’s your choice :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

960 posts in 1888 days


#4 posted 04-20-2017 06:15 PM

Not sure I understand the question.

If the post wrap is 7 1/2” wide, and you want a 1” overhang on all sides of the cap, then the cap pieces will be 9 1/2” long, no matter what the slope of the cap.

Rather than calculating compound miter angles, I think the easy way to cut the cap would be to shim up one side and cut at 45 on the chop saw.

Be aware that you are creating the potential for moisture to get trapped between post and wrap. The cap miters will likely shrink, gaps may open and allow water to get in. Keep your eye on it and caulk as needed. Weep holes would also be a good idea.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16154 posts in 3065 days


#5 posted 04-20-2017 06:26 PM



ana white huh?

- DirtyMike

Love that arrogance…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View logwolf's profile

logwolf

34 posts in 979 days


#6 posted 04-20-2017 07:37 PM



ana white huh?

- DirtyMike

Dirty Mike…????

-- Larry

View logwolf's profile

logwolf

34 posts in 979 days


#7 posted 04-20-2017 07:49 PM



Personally, I think it looks better without the base on the posts. And if I did, I d make them lower that the window sills – maybe 12” lower. I would just trim off the posts at the bottom to close off the opening at the deck. But it s your pergola, so obviously it s your choice :)

- builtinbkyn

I think that picture may be misleading. I apologize for that. This is a detached deck with more distance between my windows and post then it appears. Not worried about water rolling off onto windows sills. There are no sills, just vinyl frame. That middle post sits exactly between the windows. The 1 x’s that I’ll be wrapping around those posts will be attached to those spacers, you see in the picture.. Those spacers will not be seen. The wrapped 1 x’s will sit about 3/8”-1/2” off the deck, maybe less, to allow for drainage.. The spacers will have holes from top to facilitate draining. Caulking will be done on top, after I install the cap collars.
Thank you for your feedback. I appreciate it.

-- Larry

View logwolf's profile

logwolf

34 posts in 979 days


#8 posted 04-20-2017 07:55 PM


Not sure I understand the question.

If the post wrap is 7 1/2” wide, and you want a 1” overhang on all sides of the cap, then the cap pieces will be 9 1/2” long, no matter what the slope of the cap.

Rather than calculating compound miter angles, I think the easy way to cut the cap would be to shim up one side and cut at 45 on the chop saw.

Be aware that you are creating the potential for moisture to get trapped between post and wrap. The cap miters will likely shrink, gaps may open and allow water to get in. Keep your eye on it and caulk as needed. Weep holes would also be a good idea.

- jerryminer

OK, that’s great, the outside length will still be 9 1/2”. But my miters will change after I angle the side of the cap facing the post, right? I think I’ll just experiment with the angle I want, and adjust from there.
Thank you for your feedback. Greatly appreciate it.

-- Larry

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16154 posts in 3065 days


#9 posted 04-20-2017 08:02 PM

Log, I’m not sure but I think you’re overanalyzing. If the ‘back’ and ‘bottom’ of the pieces being mitred form a 90 degree angle, with long run being you sloped element, it won’t cut or join any different than square stock as long as that 90 degree corner is at the back of the mitre box.

Does that make sense, or am I missing something?

Also, thinking of adding a drip kerf to the underside?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1346 days


#10 posted 04-20-2017 08:15 PM

I agree with Jerry.

View tmasondarnell's profile

tmasondarnell

114 posts in 2236 days


#11 posted 04-20-2017 08:18 PM

Logwolf,

I think I understand your question.

If you have a table saw, as an alternative to trying to figure the compound miter angle, switch the material to 2x or larger. Cut the material with 45 degree miters just as if you were going to fit it as the drawing shows. Take it to the table saw and cut the angle to get the slope on the top of the material so it shed water.

View logwolf's profile

logwolf

34 posts in 979 days


#12 posted 04-20-2017 08:30 PM



Logwolf,

I think I understand your question.

If you have a table saw, as an alternative to trying to figure the compound miter angle, switch the material to 2x or larger. Cut the material with 45 degree miters just as if you were going to fit it as the drawing shows. Take it to the table saw and cut the angle to get the slope on the top of the material so it shed water.

- tmasondarnell

Yes, that’s the idea I’m trying to explain. However, don’t want to use 2 x’s. But I think I can accomplish this by sloping my bandsaw table down. It does not have to be a 45 degree angle. Thank you for giving that idea. Appreciate it.

-- Larry

View logwolf's profile

logwolf

34 posts in 979 days


#13 posted 04-20-2017 08:36 PM

Thank you everyone for your help. I looked on you tube and Google for weeks trying to come up with an idea for this. Now I have several options, Sorry I was not as clear on this as I tried.
Thank you again.

-- Larry

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2627 posts in 3444 days


#14 posted 04-21-2017 12:32 PM

I would bevel the top cap to let water run away from post. Also I would cut a drip groove on underside of cap to let water fall down , similar to a window sill. Keep as much moisture away from the skirting

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16154 posts in 3065 days


#15 posted 04-21-2017 01:17 PM

+1 to Chips, that’s exactly what I envisioned as well (and unsuccessfully tried to describe above).

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View logwolf's profile

logwolf

34 posts in 979 days


#16 posted 04-21-2017 04:50 PM



I would bevel the top cap to let water run away from post. Also I would cut a drip groove on underside of cap to let water fall down , similar to a window sill. Keep as much moisture away from the skirting

- canadianchips

Never thought of putting a drip groove underneath. Great idea. And yes beveling the top of the boards is what I’ll do. Thank you all again.
Smitty, your explanation was clear. Thank you

-- Larry

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2627 posts in 3444 days


#17 posted 04-22-2017 02:21 AM

Smitty you did explain it. I am terrible at try to explain. Pictures help me !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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