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Looking for a super thin saw blade

by I_Need_More_Lumber
posted 02-16-2017 03:30 AM


45 replies so far

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

663 posts in 2298 days


#1 posted 02-16-2017 03:44 AM

Combination blade probably the closest without going custom but 2 inch maximum cut depth.

http://www.infinitytools.com/10-laser-kerf-saw-blade-40t-1-16-kerf

http://www.totalsawsolutions.com/

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3732 days


#2 posted 02-16-2017 04:46 AM

Lots of money for little nothing. Why do you need this extra thin kerf? Scratch that question, you need to rip thick stock? No the term is resaw thick stock. Use a damn band saw

View Rich's profile

Rich

4419 posts in 953 days


#3 posted 02-16-2017 05:20 AM

+1 on the Infinity. +1 also on papadan’s comment.

The only use I see for the blade is if you are ripping strips of expensive wood, like ebony. Say, for plugs or something. Even then, it will take a lot of cuts to pay for itself.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2937 posts in 1304 days


#4 posted 02-16-2017 05:37 AM

Well he said he doesn’t own a band saw. So that negates that. I use a Dewalt Precision blade for ripping thin stock to the get the most strips out of the width of what I’m ripping. It won’t rip 8/4 stock though. Maybe you need to use a track saw or skill saw for this. You can do 8/4 with the Dewalt blade and a hand held saw.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#5 posted 02-16-2017 05:47 AM



Lots of money for little nothing. Why do you need this extra thin kerf? Scratch that question, you need to rip thick stock? No the term is resaw thick stock. Use a damn band saw

- papadan

Suggestion not helpful.

View I_Need_More_Lumber's profile

I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#6 posted 02-16-2017 05:52 AM


Well he said he doesn t own a band saw. So that negates that. I use a Dewalt Precision blade for ripping thin stock to the get the most strips out of the width of what I m ripping. It won t rip 8/4 stock though. Maybe you need to use a track saw or skill saw for this. You can do 8/4 with the Dewalt blade and a hand held saw.

- builtinbkyn

Thanks for noticing that I mentioned about not having a bandsaw.

My main purpose is to cut thin stock. I am trying to get pieces at a net of 1/8” thick. The thicker the blade, the more waste there is. Using a circular saw may help with the Diablo blade I mentioned.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4419 posts in 953 days


#7 posted 02-16-2017 05:54 AM

I gave a thumbs-up on papadan’s post. Does that mean I’m not helpful either? He made a valid point, even if it was in his redneck way (which we love him for).

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#8 posted 02-16-2017 05:56 AM



Combination blade probably the closest without going custom but 2 inch maximum cut depth.

http://www.infinitytools.com/10-laser-kerf-saw-blade-40t-1-16-kerf

http://www.totalsawsolutions.com/

- TravisH


Awesome! Exactly what I was looking for.

Thank you, TravisH!

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#9 posted 02-16-2017 06:00 AM



I gave a thumbs-up on papadan s post. Does that mean I m not helpful either? He made a valid point, even if it was in his redneck way (which we love him for).

- RichTaylor


If your are suggesting using a tool, which I mentioned beforehand about not having, then yes.

In my original post, I am looking for what I asked for like what TravisH mentioned or alternatives.

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Rich

4419 posts in 953 days


#10 posted 02-16-2017 06:01 AM


My main purpose is to cut thin stock. I am trying to get pieces at a net of 1/8” thick. The thicker the blade, the more waste there is. Using a circular saw may help.

- INeedMore_Lumber

I can appreciate that. But you have to calculate the savings versus the cost of the blade. That Infinity blade is $160. It is 1/16” kerf versus the 3/32” of a regular thin-kerf blade. You’re saving 1/32” per pass. Do the math to determine the breakeven point.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#11 posted 02-16-2017 06:02 AM

I gave a thumbs-up on papadan s post. Does that mean I m not helpful either? He made a valid point, even if it was in his redneck way (which we love him for).

- RichTaylor


If your are suggesting using a tool, which I mentioned beforehand about not having, then yes.

In my original post, I am looking for what I asked for like what TravisH mentioned or alternatives.

By the way, you correctly got what I was doing except for the ebony part. I wish I can afford that.

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Rich

4419 posts in 953 days


#12 posted 02-16-2017 06:05 AM

Best wishes. May you have many thirty-seconds of a slice in your future.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View I_Need_More_Lumber's profile

I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#13 posted 02-16-2017 06:11 AM



I can appreciate that. But you have to calculate the savings versus the cost of the blade. That Infinity blade is $160. It is 1/16” kerf versus the 3/32” of a regular thin-kerf blade. You re saving 1/32” per pass. Do the math to determine the breakeven point.

- RichTaylor


Well I get what you are saying, but the cut that I plan on doing is a cut that I plan on doing for many many many years. That price of that blade will spread out over time. I don’t mind buying a quality blade for that price.

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Rich

4419 posts in 953 days


#14 posted 02-16-2017 06:14 AM

I understand your concern. It’s valid. I’m just saying you need to weigh the costs. How many 1/32” savings from cuts you make will pay for that blade? That was the crux of my ebony comment.

It’ll take a load of cuts of woods that are even average in cost, like cherry, walnut, to pay for that blade.

This would be a great challenge for LJers. How many linear feet of, say, walnut, would you have to cut to pay for a $160 saw blade? Pick a $/bf and run with it.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Rich

4419 posts in 953 days


#15 posted 02-16-2017 06:18 AM



Well I get what you are saying, but the cut that I plan on doing is a cut that I plan on doing for many many many years. That price of that blade will spread out over time. I don t mind buying a quality blade for that price.

- INeedMore_Lumber


We agree. Let’s let the LJ savings challenge stand :)

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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papadan

3584 posts in 3732 days


#16 posted 02-16-2017 06:19 AM

You didn’t answer the question, Why do you need such a thin cut?

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#17 posted 02-16-2017 06:28 AM



I understand your concern. It s valid. I m just saying you need to weigh the costs. How many 1/32” savings from cuts you make will pay for that blade? That was the crux of my ebony comment.

It ll take a load of cuts of woods that are even average in cost, like cherry, walnut, to pay for that blade.

This would be a great challenge for LJers. How many linear feet of, say, walnut, would you have to cut to pay for a $160 saw blade? Pick a $/bf and run with it.

- RichTaylor

I can’t figure out that math problem right now. It’ll take me time to the point where this thread is dead :). But I do see what your saying.

Other than the blade possibly squeezing out one more piece for me, it can help by not having to buy more boards which obviously reduces the BF.

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#18 posted 02-16-2017 06:30 AM



You didn t answer the question, Why do you need such a thin cut?

- papadan


Looking to rip 1/8” net pieces with minimal finishing work.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8278 posts in 3739 days


#19 posted 02-16-2017 10:22 AM


Combination blade probably the closest without going custom but 2 inch maximum cut depth.

http://www.infinitytools.com/10-laser-kerf-saw-blade-40t-1-16-kerf

http://www.totalsawsolutions.com/

- TravisH

+1 on the Infinity Laser kerf blade. Expensive, but a very, very good blade. There’s a proprietary splitter available for it too.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View isotope's profile

isotope

177 posts in 1987 days


#20 posted 02-16-2017 02:17 PM

Purely because I like wasting my time on stuff like this.
A 1/32” slice of 8/4 lumber is equal to 0.005208 bdft per lineal foot. Therefore, you need to rip 192’ of lumber to save 1 bdft. Assuming a $10/bdft (which pricey, but not super pricey) you would need to rip 3072’ to save $160. Assuming the typical rip cut is 4’ long, that’s 768 cuts. Assuming you make 10 cuts/day, that’s 77 days, or a 2.5 months. Not that bad.

The question I have, just for information purposes, is what is a typical kerf for a bandsaw blade?

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2937 posts in 1304 days


#21 posted 02-16-2017 03:02 PM

For those concerned with the price of the Infinity blade, well most any high end rip blade or specialty cut blade, is going to have a premium price tag. The subject blade is marginally higher than a top of the line Forrest which runs about $30 cheaper – the Custom WWII for instance. It seems the cost isn’t much of an issue for the OP. Besides it’s not like it will need to be replaced after a little use. It will probably serve years of use.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1536 posts in 2093 days


#22 posted 02-16-2017 03:22 PM

I-N-M-L, if your saw is set up correctly, cutting through halfway, and flipping it to finish the cut won’t give you as bad of a stepped cut as you’re afraid of getting. A 10” thin blade will probably flex while cutting and leave worse marks on the edge, so you’ll be complaining about that. It’s a no win. Just get a good blade, a good saw, enough wood and cut the stuff you need

If you don’t have a quality saw, it doesn’t matter what quality blade you use. It won’t help the finish on the saw cuts.

It’s been my experience that a saw won’t give you a finished surface. You’ll get close, but no cigar awarded.

Sounds like you are looking to make that “Purrrfect” cut I hear so much of in woodworking shows, but there are too many variables in cutting wood that will make changes to any savings null and void that you’ve so carefully planned. You might get lucky with a couple pieces, but others might not be as good. Waste and loss is a byproduct of woodworking. Figuring in a percentage for that waste and loss is a good idea instead of trying to stretch a piece of wood. Also obsessing on trying to get exactly what the board should yield is distracting and can get yourself hurt. Buy an extra piece of wood and move on with the project. At least, you’ll have some wood for the next project…..

Ten years ago, I bought 2 Amana 1/8” ATB 40 tooth combo blades. One cut a smoother surface than a negative rake 90 tooth Melamine blade I have. The other left large scallops in the edge. It was sharpened 3 times before it was reluctantly acceptable. The first one still cuts as well as it did when first purchased even though it’s been sharpened many times.

Not trying to be mean, but that’s the facts…........ Jerry(in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

379 posts in 1248 days


#23 posted 02-16-2017 03:29 PM

The linked blade with 1/16 in kerf is a 40 tooth ATB blade. Not the best for ripping. You will need to slow down and take your time. They also have a combination blade that is .097 kerf that would work better for ripping.

Definitely have to deal with the law of diminishing returns. Thinner blades waste less wood, true, but may not give as good a cut surface due to greater blade deflection. Also, you’ll need to feed slowly with that blade, so what is your time worth compared to wood wasted. Others have already alluded to the cost/benefit situation. You’ll need to figure that out.

One more point, in defense of papadan, who suggested the bandsaw, which you said you didn’t have. You’ve indicated that you will be doing this type of cut a lot over many years. Maybe it’s time to get the bandsaw?

Are you doing bent laminations? or what is the purpose? That might help with other ideas…

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1262 days


#24 posted 02-16-2017 03:34 PM


Purely because I like wasting my time on stuff like this.
A 1/32” slice of 8/4 lumber is equal to 0.005208 bdft per lineal foot. Therefore, you need to rip 192 of lumber to save 1 bdft. Assuming a $10/bdft (which pricey, but not super pricey) you would need to rip 3072 to save $160. Assuming the typical rip cut is 4 long, that s 768 cuts. Assuming you make 10 cuts/day, that s 77 days, or a 2.5 months. Not that bad.

The question I have, just for information purposes, is what is a typical kerf for a bandsaw blade?

- isotope


Also would like to note that no one has taken in account that he is going to have to buy a blade anyway, so deduct that from the cost of the infinity and he is only paying what, $80.00 more?

Even though, I agree with Nubs and sawdustdad.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

930 posts in 2715 days


#25 posted 02-16-2017 03:41 PM

INML If you have found a blade that meets your desires and can be bought at a price you are happy with and it will make your workday better for you then move on with a smile on your face.

Some nice people here in general and with honest intentions to help a fellow LJ; but the solution to your problem seems to be solved. Now, I know that you are thankful to everyone for their help and concerns and you can go happily back to work.

It still amazes me how people on this site jump in to help a fellow LJ leave with a smile and a problem solved. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

401 posts in 2363 days


#26 posted 02-16-2017 03:57 PM

I think there is probably a reason they don’t’ make typically make 10” blades that thin. I suspect getting any material stiff enough not to warp and flap around, and tough enough not to shatter would be tough. The larger the diameter of the blade the thicker it will have to be, or alternatively I guess, the slower you would have to spin it.
Yea I know, another not helpful post, but at least it might explain why you can’t find what you are looking for.

-- Ted

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8278 posts in 3739 days


#27 posted 02-16-2017 03:58 PM


.... A 10” thin blade will probably flex while cutting and leave worse marks on the edge, so you ll be complaining about that….

- Nubsnstubs

Having used the blade, flex and cut quality were not an issue IME. Possibly in part due to the built in stabilizer in the center, possibly in part to the stock being flat and straight, possibly due in part to the saw being setup well and an arbor that spins true. Whatever the reason, it was a remarkably clean cutting blade that leaves an edge on par with other premium 40T ATB designs including the WWII, TS2000, Gold Medal, etc.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View unbob's profile

unbob

810 posts in 2267 days


#28 posted 02-16-2017 05:58 PM

Table saw sled above, I found I really needed to fully support the strip, the board with the slot holds down the wood

I came upon a supply of ebony that I have been ripping thin strips, First, I was using a Freud 7 1/4”thin kerf blade on the table saw using a sled, That worked pretty good, but slow due to trying to hold close tolerance, I found the thinnest kerf blades are for mini circular saws, some are .056” kerf, I bore them to fit my shaper spindle, and use a fixture, I can hold very close tolerance, and cut strips thinner then 1/32” Somewhere I have photos of the sleds I used, I used the small blade to cut the top off this box

Oops, I see that that you need more depth, on that note, you will have to put up with some kerf loss, or blade wander,

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5440 posts in 3607 days


#29 posted 02-16-2017 06:22 PM

I don’t believe a blade with a 1/16” kerf will rip with any accuracy. Because of it’s thinness, the blade will have the tendency to “flutter”. I’m not familiar with the Infinity blade, but it doesn’t sound like a good idea. I’ve used really thin kerf blades on my table saw, but they were 7 1/4” i diameter and used on small stock and still it flutters at times.
Typical band saw blades are .025 or .035 thick.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2253 posts in 2353 days


#30 posted 02-16-2017 09:41 PM

For $160 you can almost get a small bandsaw. I have a 10” Craftsman (have a review posted on LJs), that I think still sells for ~$190, that does a great job resawing with the right blade. About a 0.025 kerf, 4-5/8” resaw capacity. For another $50 or so counting a resaw blade vs the ts blade you get a new tool that can be used for many things. Another option to consider.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8278 posts in 3739 days


#31 posted 02-16-2017 10:10 PM



I don t believe a blade with a 1/16” kerf will rip with any accuracy. Because of it s thinness, the blade will have the tendency to “flutter”. I m not familiar with the Infinity blade, but it doesn t sound like a good idea. I ve used really thin kerf blades on my table saw, but they were 7 1/4” i diameter and used on small stock and still it flutters at times.
Typical band saw blades are .025 or .035 thick.

- MrRon

Having done it with the Infinity Laser Kerf blade, I have to respectfully disagree, though I do understand your logic. They did a nice job with this blade. No doubt, a thinner blade can be more susceptible to flex, but between the permanent stabilizer and the quality of the construction and design, this one really worked quite well IME.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3732 days


#32 posted 02-16-2017 10:11 PM

INML, buy a band saw and stop wasting everyone else time.

View 9x9's profile

9x9

99 posts in 1603 days


#33 posted 02-16-2017 10:57 PM


INML, buy a band saw and stop wasting everyone else time.

- papadan

X 2 ———> buy a bandsaw

-- Youngsville, LA

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8278 posts in 3739 days


#34 posted 02-16-2017 11:45 PM

Ripping with band saws and table saws is not directly interchangeable between the two. A table saw can leave a pretty clean edge, and usually a light sanding will put you at the finish ready level. A band saw leaves a much rougher finish, meaning additional smoothing is necessary, usually with a planer or jointer….not a trivial thing to someone who doesn’t own one, and still extra steps for those who do. Once all is said and done, the total kerf width of the actual band saw cut, plus planing away the rough finish are likely to consume as much or more material than a TS with an ultra thin kerf blade. Am I missing something about ripping with a band saw?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

927 posts in 2346 days


#35 posted 02-17-2017 01:51 AM



INML, buy a band saw and stop wasting everyone else time.

- papadan

Is it your goal to be as obnoxious as possible? This isn’t even my thread and you’ve annoyed the hell out of me.

Repeating the same point of view over and over again because you think you’re right is getting this guy no where, either try to help in the specified constraints or just don’t comment and waste his time. Maybe he’s not into buying shitty tools and doesn’t want a 9” Craftsman bandsaw, maybe he has limited space and can’t fit one, either way your coming off as a huge A-hole.

I myself beyond having used the Freud industrial TK rip can’t help, as the Infinity blade has got it beat. Good luck with getting what you need and ignore the narrow-minded.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

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UpstateNYdude

927 posts in 2346 days


#36 posted 02-17-2017 02:02 AM



Ripping with band saws and table saws is not directly interchangeable between the two. A table saw can leave a pretty clean edge, and usually a light sanding will put you at the finish ready level. A band saw leaves a much rougher finish, meaning additional smoothing is necessary, usually with a planer or jointer….not a trivial thing to someone who doesn t own one, and still extra steps for those who do. Once all is said and done, the total kerf width of the actual band saw cut, plus planing away the rough finish are likely to consume as much or more material than a TS with an ultra thin kerf blade. Am I missing something about ripping with a band saw?

- knotscott

Nope that was my thinking also, I’ve never had a cleaner cut from a BS than a TS and as you stated all that kerf you save will be gone and more after smoothing/sanding.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3732 days


#37 posted 02-17-2017 04:07 AM


INML, buy a band saw and stop wasting everyone else time.

- papadan

Is it your goal to be as obnoxious as possible? This isn t even my thread and you ve annoyed the hell out of me.

Repeating the same point of view over and over again because you think you re right is getting this guy no where, either try to help in the specified constraints or just don t comment and waste his time. Maybe he s not into buying shitty tools and doesn t want a 9” Craftsman bandsaw, maybe he has limited space and can t fit one, either way your coming off as a huge A-hole.

I myself beyond having used the Freud industrial TK rip can t help, as the Infinity blade has got it beat. Good luck with getting what you need and ignore the narrow-minded.

- UpstateNYdude


Thanks for your input Nick, the OP made an ooops early on and I was offended, but still tried to help. Why are you here my friend?

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#38 posted 02-17-2017 05:10 AM



For those concerned with the price of the Infinity blade, well most any high end rip blade or specialty cut blade, is going to have a premium price tag. The subject blade is marginally higher than a top of the line Forrest which runs about $30 cheaper – the Custom WWII for instance. It seems the cost isn t much of an issue for the OP. Besides it s not like it will need to be replaced after a little use. It will probably serve years of use.

- builtinbkyn

When I decide which of the 2 blades mentioned by TravisH, I believe it will serve me many years because I’m one of those people who buy only ripping and cross cutting blades, no in between blades for me.

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#39 posted 02-17-2017 05:29 AM


I-N-M-L, if your saw is set up correctly, cutting through halfway, and flipping it to finish the cut won t give you as bad of a stepped cut as you re afraid of getting. A 10” thin blade will probably flex while cutting and leave worse marks on the edge, so you ll be complaining about that. It s a no win. Just get a good blade, a good saw, enough wood and cut the stuff you need

If you don t have a quality saw, it doesn t matter what quality blade you use. It won t help the finish on the saw cuts.

It s been my experience that a saw won t give you a finished surface. You ll get close, but no cigar awarded.

Sounds like you are looking to make that “Purrrfect” cut I hear so much of in woodworking shows, but there are too many variables in cutting wood that will make changes to any savings null and void that you ve so carefully planned. You might get lucky with a couple pieces, but others might not be as good. Waste and loss is a byproduct of woodworking. Figuring in a percentage for that waste and loss is a good idea instead of trying to stretch a piece of wood. Also obsessing on trying to get exactly what the board should yield is distracting and can get yourself hurt. Buy an extra piece of wood and move on with the project. At least, you ll have some wood for the next project…..

Ten years ago, I bought 2 Amana 1/8” ATB 40 tooth combo blades. One cut a smoother surface than a negative rake 90 tooth Melamine blade I have. The other left large scallops in the edge. It was sharpened 3 times before it was reluctantly acceptable. The first one still cuts as well as it did when first purchased even though it s been sharpened many times.

Not trying to be mean, but that s the facts…........ Jerry(in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

No offense taken Jerry. Your input is very helpful.

I do believe the guide in my table saw might be off. It was a rental when I bought it years ago and its a job site table saw. I doubt it’s me. I do have quality blades. 2 Freuds, one for ripping and cross cutting. When I try ripping half the height and flipping it afterwards, it just gives me unsatisfactory cuts.

As for the “finish ripping”, it won’t happen, but I do want to do minimal sanding afterwards. The less work, the more efficient I can be.

I think since I’m fairly new to buying hardwoods and paying by BF, I have that habit of trying to get that perfect piece. I think eventually I’ll buy extra boards. :)

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#40 posted 02-17-2017 05:45 AM



The linked blade with 1/16 in kerf is a 40 tooth ATB blade. Not the best for ripping. You will need to slow down and take your time. They also have a combination blade that is .097 kerf that would work better for ripping.

Definitely have to deal with the law of diminishing returns. Thinner blades waste less wood, true, but may not give as good a cut surface due to greater blade deflection. Also, you ll need to feed slowly with that blade, so what is your time worth compared to wood wasted. Others have already alluded to the cost/benefit situation. You ll need to figure that out.

One more point, in defense of papadan, who suggested the bandsaw, which you said you didn t have. You ve indicated that you will be doing this type of cut a lot over many years. Maybe it s time to get the bandsaw?

Are you doing bent laminations? or what is the purpose? That might help with other ideas…

- sawdustdad


I wouldn’t want a bandsaw because I’m doing pure straight cuts and that doesn’t justify getting that tool. Also, I don’t have have much space. I have to roll out all my tools.

I make cutting boards and other things. The 1/8” strips are the finish sizes I’m aiming for. I won’t get that straight off a rip, but if I can do that with light sanding afterwards, that perfect.

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#41 posted 02-17-2017 05:48 AM



INML If you have found a blade that meets your desires and can be bought at a price you are happy with and it will make your workday better for you then move on with a smile on your face.

Some nice people here in general and with honest intentions to help a fellow LJ; but the solution to your problem seems to be solved. Now, I know that you are thankful to everyone for their help and concerns and you can go happily back to work.

It still amazes me how people on this site jump in to help a fellow LJ leave with a smile and a problem solved. larry

- ohtimberwolf


Ya. I got lots off feedback and I’m thankful for that.

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#42 posted 02-17-2017 05:52 AM



INML, buy a band saw and stop wasting everyone else time.

- papadan


I’m not wasting anyone’s time. This is forum where your welcomed to choose what you want and do not want to read.

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#43 posted 02-17-2017 05:54 AM



Is it your goal to be as obnoxious as possible? This isn t even my thread and you ve annoyed the hell out of me.

Repeating the same point of view over and over again because you think you re right is getting this guy no where, either try to help in the specified constraints or just don t comment and waste his time. Maybe he s not into buying shitty tools and doesn t want a 9” Craftsman bandsaw, maybe he has limited space and can t fit one, either way your coming off as a huge A-hole.

I myself beyond having used the Freud industrial TK rip can t help, as the Infinity blade has got it beat. Good luck with getting what you need and ignore the narrow-minded.

- UpstateNYdude

Thank you.

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I_Need_More_Lumber

32 posts in 1166 days


#44 posted 02-17-2017 05:56 AM


Ripping with band saws and table saws is not directly interchangeable between the two. A table saw can leave a pretty clean edge, and usually a light sanding will put you at the finish ready level. A band saw leaves a much rougher finish, meaning additional smoothing is necessary, usually with a planer or jointer….not a trivial thing to someone who doesn t own one, and still extra steps for those who do. Once all is said and done, the total kerf width of the actual band saw cut, plus planing away the rough finish are likely to consume as much or more material than a TS with an ultra thin kerf blade. Am I missing something about ripping with a band saw?

- knotscott


Good point.

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Tony_S

967 posts in 3446 days


#45 posted 02-17-2017 11:20 AM


INML, buy a band saw and stop wasting everyone else time.

- papadan


I’ve read…I don’t know how many posts/threads of yours with you acting like a know it all, obnoxious ass….but this one(not one of your worst) Kind of pushed me over.

I need some advise Dan.
I run a 35000 sq ft shop, with one section dedicated to doing, and achieving exactly what the op is wanting to achieve, producing high volume(although a much higher volume I’m sure), thin strips with absolute minimal cleanup and waste.
I’m running an SCM-M3 60 hp gang rip 14” full kerf blades(Royce//Ayr)...a 7 hp delta with a power feed running 10” Tenryu gold metal blades, and a dedicated Hitachi re-saw for tall ripping that the M3 can’t handle.(sorry, can’t afford a frame saw right now).
How can I tweak my operation? I’ve got 4 bandsaw’s in the shop now…..should I sell all of the above and and just buy another one?
Oh…I also have at my disposal, two scm-630 thickness planers and two 36” wide belt sanders (scm and timesaver) if that helps with your advice.
Looking forward…..

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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