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View Brett Gray's profile

Can anyone tell me the identification of this wood?

by Brett Gray
posted 02-13-2017 02:06 PM


32 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17892 posts in 3367 days


#1 posted 02-13-2017 02:16 PM

The streaks remind me of African mahogany.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

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KYSean

119 posts in 3957 days


#2 posted 02-13-2017 02:29 PM

Looks like Bubinga.

-- http://editedwrite.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4285 posts in 2128 days


#3 posted 02-13-2017 02:51 PM

mahogany.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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000

2859 posts in 1260 days


#4 posted 02-13-2017 02:58 PM

Ribbon Sapele maybe?

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Rich

4404 posts in 950 days


#5 posted 02-13-2017 03:07 PM

+1 on African mahogany. If it exhibits chatoyance — a shift in vibrancy as you move it under light — it’s most likely AM.

Edit: I should have said “in the mahogany family.” African, sapele, Cuban, Honduran all exhibit that characteristic.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2837 posts in 2657 days


#6 posted 02-13-2017 03:50 PM

Mahogany.

View Brett Gray's profile

Brett Gray

7 posts in 829 days


#7 posted 02-14-2017 12:14 AM

Thanks for your input everyone! What threw me off was the extreamly high weight and density. I’ve got some genuine mahogany but this is much, much heavier than that. I’ve never worked with any African Mohogany though. I’ll post better pictures of the grain after I figure out how to plane/cut it. It’s much too large and heavy for my bench top12.5in planer.

-- Brett G.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3729 days


#8 posted 02-14-2017 12:25 AM

Can’t get a pic right now, but it reminds me of some Bokote I have. Same grain, colors and real heavy and hard. Brett, most people are highly allergic to Bokote, ship it to me and i’ll let you know if I break out.;-)

View Brett Gray's profile

Brett Gray

7 posts in 829 days


#9 posted 02-14-2017 02:42 AM

Thanks papadan! I looked up pictures of Bokote online and so far that looks like the closest match. I read that it gets darker as it ages, which would make sense in this case because it was sitting in an abandoned saw mill for years. I would be interested to see a picture of yours if you ever get the chance.

-- Brett G.

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1847 days


#10 posted 02-14-2017 03:02 AM

Shave an endgrain spot with a plane or knife or razor knife. A good clean look at the pore arrangement will do womders for identification.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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WhoMe

1564 posts in 3604 days


#11 posted 02-14-2017 03:29 AM

I work with exotics almost daily. Mexican Bocote I see is usually much darker than that. A very dark brown to an almost black wood with thinner creme to yellowish growth rings. It is very dense with very little pore structure that can be seen and is an oilier wood. If your board has any open pore structure, I doubt it is Bocote.
But from the shots i see, I’m leaning towards the Sapele/African mahogany identification. Both are heavier and more dense than some of the other mahoganies and have much more pronounced grain contrast.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View McFly's profile

McFly

273 posts in 1388 days


#12 posted 02-14-2017 04:17 PM



Thanks for your input everyone! What threw me off was the extreamly high weight and density. I ve got some genuine mahogany but this is much, much heavier than that. I ve never worked with any African Mohogany though. I ll post better pictures of the grain after I figure out how to plane/cut it. It s much too large and heavy for my bench top12.5in planer.

- Brett Gray

Jatoba / Brazilian Cherry is my guess. Endgrain pic would help

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Brett Gray

7 posts in 829 days


#13 posted 02-14-2017 04:56 PM

Another detail I forgot to mention is that I noticed a fairly pernounced oder when I was sanding that I’ve never smelled before on previous woods I’ve worked with. I’ll try to get a good end grain picture when I get home today.

-- Brett G.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1981 days


#14 posted 02-14-2017 07:39 PM

It’s gonna be Ipe or Cumaru. I promise. :)

Board is cut for decking. It looks exactly like that and is VERY dense and heavy. The interlocking grain is consistent with it as well.

You can easily tell if it’s Mahogany versus Ipe by cutting a small bit and putting it in water. The first will float, the second will sink. It it sinks there is no way it is Mahogany.

Cumaru has a distinctive smell when cut. I don’t have a word for it. It isn’t unpleasant. Maybe vanilla?

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Brett Gray

7 posts in 829 days


#15 posted 02-14-2017 09:15 PM


Here is the end grain picture

-- Brett G.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11491 posts in 3789 days


#16 posted 02-14-2017 10:03 PM

No idea, but it’s sure purdy.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2939 posts in 2336 days


#17 posted 02-14-2017 10:09 PM

Cumaru

-- Paul, Duvall, WA

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1981 days


#18 posted 02-14-2017 11:25 PM

Oh yeah. That’s Cumaru. I did a whole deck of it. I’d know it in my sleep.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

966 posts in 3444 days


#19 posted 02-14-2017 11:36 PM

My best guess would be Jarrah.
I would have guessed Cumaru as well, until I saw the end grain picture. Not even close to Cumaru…..the pic above has a pretty crazy and distinct pore arrangement…just like Jarrah.
http://www.wood-database.com/jarrah/
Another mention. Scroll down to the “pore arrangement” there’s another picture of Jarrah end grain and description.

Pics from the Hobbit as well.
http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/jarrah.htm

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1981 days


#20 posted 02-15-2017 01:56 AM

From my Cumaru stash at home.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

966 posts in 3444 days


#21 posted 02-15-2017 11:11 AM

Dumass me…forgot to post one of the links from the wood database.
http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/hardwood-anatomy/

LiveEdge
The end grain in your picture above doesn’t match any of the Cumaru end grain shots I can find.

The only ‘close’ match I can see to yours is Peruvian shihuahuaco / Dipteryx micrantha
Apparently a Cumaru substitute and vice versa.(happens all the time with a lot of imports/exotics)
True Cumaru is Dipteryx odorata.
Same Genus, different Species.
I’m stickin’ with Jarrah.
Splitting hairs in some sense, yes…but none the less, neither micrantha or odorata are as close a match to the op’s picture(on my monitor anyways) as Jarrah.
At the end of the day, it’s just an educated guess…..I’m no botanist by any stretch…just weird.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View Brett Gray's profile

Brett Gray

7 posts in 829 days


#22 posted 02-15-2017 02:12 PM

Thanks for your help everyone! I’ve got the native trees down, but I’m still trying to learn the exotics. I was hoping it was a more valuable wood but I still only paid $10 for it, along with a few very large walnut, cherry, maple, and one 16bf genuine mohogany board that I got all for $10each. It was a gold mine!

-- Brett G.

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Aj2

2202 posts in 2159 days


#23 posted 02-15-2017 02:23 PM

I’m going to throw my guess in to add more confusion.
It looks like Apitong.
Here’s a pic of Apitng end grain I found on the Internet.
My second guess is tiger wood.

-- Aj

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1981 days


#24 posted 02-15-2017 04:59 PM


Dumass me…forgot to post one of the links from the wood database.
http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/hardwood-anatomy/

LiveEdge
The end grain in your picture above doesn t match any of the Cumaru end grain shots I can find.

The only close match I can see to yours is Peruvian shihuahuaco / Dipteryx micrantha
Apparently a Cumaru substitute and vice versa.(happens all the time with a lot of imports/exotics)
True Cumaru is Dipteryx odorata.
Same Genus, different Species.
I m stickin with Jarrah.
Splitting hairs in some sense, yes…but none the less, neither micrantha or odorata are as close a match to the op s picture(on my monitor anyways) as Jarrah.
At the end of the day, it s just an educated guess…..I m no botanist by any stretch…just weird.

- TonyS



I don’t mind the disagreement, but I’ll present a few pieces of evidence to disagree back with you.:)

1) From what I can find, Dipteryx micrantha has a specific gravity of between 0.82 and 0.92. Odorata has a sp. gravity between 0.86 and 1.09. The wood in my shop sinks easily in water.
2) I purchased 2000 linear feet of it. Although, that is no guarantee I’m getting what I asked for, I would speculate the buyers (Crosscut hardwood) in this case would be doing their best to make sure they are getting what they, themselves, purchased since it was a large shipment.
3) I can’t find whether micrantha has a smell when cut, but odorata is listed as a vanilla smell and I would quite agree with that assessment.

In the end, we both know that wood can be sold as one thing and be another. I think the sinking in water is moderately strong evidence that this is true Dipteryx odorata._

Your pore pattern with the Jarrah is actually pretty good. I can appreciate the zig-zag as well. I suggest the original poster tries the water test because only a few woods have a sp. gravity above 1.00. Jarrah should float. Cumaru should sink. Ipe should also sink.

I took the endgrain picture with my phone. If I have time tonight I’ll pull out my SLR and macro and get you a good picture of the endgrain since we both seem to like the detective aspect of identification. :)

View Brett Gray's profile

Brett Gray

7 posts in 829 days


#25 posted 02-15-2017 05:59 PM

I just did the water test on 3 small pieces that I cut off and they did float.

-- Brett G.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1981 days


#26 posted 02-15-2017 06:17 PM



I just did the water test on 3 small pieces that I cut off and they did float.

- Brett Gray

Awesome. That probably makes cumaru and ipe less likely. Tony’s suggestion of Jarrah might be a good one.

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

888 posts in 2265 days


#27 posted 02-15-2017 06:46 PM

Not a scientist but here’s from the Cumaru entry of wooddatabase.com:

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .86, 1.09

So to me that looks like sometimes it’ll float, sometimes it’ll sink. If I’m reading it right, floating or sinking is not necessarily a bellwether for cumaru.

To me it looks like cumaru, which I’ve laid my deck with. And there is a notable smell to cumaru, especially when cut. Never worked with Jarrah yet.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1981 days


#28 posted 02-15-2017 06:57 PM

Any chance the OP can take his chunk he put in the water, measure the dimensions carefully and weigh it? We could come up with a decent density then. Wood Database says jarrah’s range is .66-.84 and cumaru’s is 0.86-1.09. Since there is so little overlap you could possibly distinguish the two by its weight.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 1981 days


#29 posted 02-16-2017 04:18 AM

So Tony, I get to eat my words a little. I went back and tried to float/sink my wood and after sitting in the garage for 3-4 years it floats. I came up with a weight of 52 lb/ft^3 and a sp gravity of .832 kg/m^3. Now I’m not sure what I have. Maybe it’s still true cumaru and it’s as dry as it’s going to get. Maybe it’s your species. Here is a nicer picture of the pores.

ADDENDUM: I don’t mean to hijack this thread, and I’m not sure this is helping the OP, but the plot thickens with my own wood. I grabbed two more pieces out of the garage and they both sank. Their weight came to 60 lb/ft^3 an d a sp. gravity of .969 (which should float, but it doesn’t and is likely math and measuring error in my instruments). Here’s a picture of these pores. Do I have mixed species in my batch? I wonder.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

966 posts in 3444 days


#30 posted 02-16-2017 11:39 AM

Sorry….been pretty busy the last couple of days.
Just a quick response for now to the photo’s above. It looks to me like you do in fact have a mixed batch.
Top pic looks like micrantha….
Bottom pic looks like odorata
Maybe a bit more later.

I was also going to bring up your comment mid thread, about your dealer being sure that they’re getting what they’re asking for.
Thats really not the case, even with the largest, most trustworthy distributors. In instances like this, they probably wouldn’t even know, or care….simply because 99.9% of the time, it wouldn’t be an issue.
I’ve had a few instances over the last many years where material arrived(notably Sapele) and as soon as I looked at it….had a wtf moment?! Completly innocent on the wholesaler’s part…

BTW, yesterday I ‘googled’ “Dipteryx micrantha cumaru” which isn’t actually cumaru….
https://www.google.ca/search?q=Dipteryx+micrantha&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&gws_rd=cr&ei=AIilWNv1Hcm7jwS8_YDQCg#q=Dipteryx+micrantha+cumaru
There doesn’t seem to be a shortage of pages calling micrantha ‘cumaru’. lol!
Gotta run…I’ll be back.

Great photo’s by the way!

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3320 posts in 3137 days


#31 posted 02-16-2017 12:38 PM

It is easy to settle what it is – send it ALL my way and I will identify it. We can call it “awesome” LOL!

-- David in Damascus, MD

View WAPY's profile

WAPY

56 posts in 687 days


#32 posted 07-12-2017 07:02 AM

in my opinion it should be awaiian koa, very fine wood used in luthery to make ukulele (awaiian guitar) or parquets and even furniture of high quality.

It’s an acacia that grows in the awaiian territory and was used by local people to build canoes; somehow brittle with those stripes of fibers dark and reddish and a very evident end grain. its an hardwood but it floats …. and very very expensive !

-- the good woodworker feels what the tree wanted to become

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