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View platinumaa's profile

kitchen countertop finishing question

by platinumaa
posted 02-09-2017 01:48 PM


14 replies so far

View Robert's profile

Robert

3533 posts in 1985 days


#1 posted 02-09-2017 01:55 PM

There are food save finishes available. Mr. Google will help you there.

I’ve also heard people use mineral oil and beeswax.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Rich's profile

Rich

4953 posts in 1094 days


#2 posted 02-09-2017 02:26 PM

Just about any finish is food safe once it’s cured. If you want a durable, attractive, easy-to-apply finish, it’s hard to beat wipe-on poly. You can get it in satin, and just keep adding coats until you get your desired surface.

It’ll be a few weeks before it’s cured to the point where you can’t detect any odor.

Oils and wax are not going to be durable in the long run.

-- Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to sound smarter the faster they come at you.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117721 posts in 4082 days


#3 posted 02-09-2017 02:29 PM

I agree with Rich

View platinumaa's profile

platinumaa

13 posts in 1020 days


#4 posted 02-09-2017 03:47 PM

rich, thanks for the info.. the ‘wipe on poly”, does it have that real shiny finish when its complete? the girls dont like that thick shiny finish, also do you have a brand you like?.. thanks for the info!

RWE, i am aware google has that info, almost 5 million pages in .02 seconds.. but i like forums since i can give detailed questions and get specific answers

thanks again!

View smitdog's profile

smitdog

442 posts in 2610 days


#5 posted 02-09-2017 03:57 PM

You can get poly in different sheens, gloss, satin and I think there is even a matte available. The higher gloss is more durable because it has more of the hardening agent in it so what I did on my floors was several coats of the gloss for durability then a couple coats of satin on top to knock the shininess down. But for countertops you could go all matte and be fine, no feet stomping around on it and all… The wipe on poly has more of a satin look to it as well, definitely nothing like the high gloss epoxy bar top coatings and restaurant tables.

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2496 posts in 4375 days


#6 posted 02-09-2017 04:04 PM

For whats is worth I am, as we speak, finishing up some Walnut counter tops, and I will be doing as smitdog said, I am going with base coats of gloss and then finish in satin, I am using Arm R Seal .

View Rich's profile

Rich

4953 posts in 1094 days


#7 posted 02-09-2017 04:14 PM



rich, thanks for the info.. the wipe on poly”, does it have that real shiny finish when its complete? the girls dont like that thick shiny finish, also do you have a brand you like?.. thanks for the info!

- platinumaa

You can get wipe-on poly in gloss or satin. You said they didn’t want a shiny surface in your original post, so that’s why I mentioned satin in my reply.

-- Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to sound smarter the faster they come at you.

View platinumaa's profile

platinumaa

13 posts in 1020 days


#8 posted 02-12-2017 08:58 PM

perfect, thank you everyone for the knowledge.. i appreciate it!

View WoodMac56's profile

WoodMac56

15 posts in 932 days


#9 posted 03-25-2017 11:44 AM

Agree on the Arm-r-seal. I built walnut counters and initially used Waterlox but it scratches way too easy. Top coated with arm-r-seal and it is much more durable.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1096 days


#10 posted 03-25-2017 04:21 PM

You guys must be messing with the OP. What kind of fool would put a polyurethane on a kitchen countertop that is subject to standing water, oils, cleaning supplies, some hard actions from utensils, hot frying pans and pots, etc etc.
Countertops must be finished with oils and other non-curing finishes and reapplied regularly.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4953 posts in 1094 days


#11 posted 03-25-2017 11:00 PM



What kind of fool would put a polyurethane on a kitchen countertop that is subject to standing water, oils, cleaning supplies, some hard actions from utensils, hot frying pans and pots, etc etc.
Countertops must be finished with oils and other non-curing finishes and reapplied regularly.

- Carloz

What kind of fool thinks that any topcoat for a wooden countertop would resist damage from a hot frying pan?

-- Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to sound smarter the faster they come at you.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7478 posts in 2704 days


#12 posted 03-25-2017 11:08 PM

What kind of fool would put a polyurethane on a kitchen countertop that is subject to standing water, oils, cleaning supplies, some hard actions from utensils, hot frying pans and pots, etc etc.
- Carloz

Yeah… that polyurethane stuff is only good for floors where it won’t see any abuse :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1425 days


#13 posted 03-26-2017 03:31 PM

Platinumaa,

Evidently your daughters have differing tastes and I am sure you want to keep piece in the family. I assume the butcher block countertops will require some trimming to fit. If so, a couple of offcuts could be used as sample boards. Various stains and finishes could then be applied along the length of the offcuts. Perhaps among the array of choices displayed on the offcuts to which the test finishes were applied, your daughters could settle on a look that they both like. Hopefully whatever they decide, the final look of the installed countertops will work well with the woods and color tones in the rest of the kitchen.

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 3370 days


#14 posted 03-26-2017 03:34 PM



You guys must be messing with the OP. What kind of fool would put a polyurethane on a kitchen countertop that is subject to standing water, oils, cleaning supplies, some hard actions from utensils, hot frying pans and pots, etc etc.
Countertops must be finished with oils and other non-curing finishes and reapplied regularly.

- Carloz

Sounds like you really abuse your counter tops, I never did any of that to laminate or quartz.

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