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Plans or No Plans ...

by Ron Aylor
posted 01-25-2017 08:09 PM


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114 replies

114 replies so far

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WildBillster

8 posts in 1045 days


#1 posted 01-25-2017 08:38 PM

Good advice! Thank you from a newbie

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William Shelley

609 posts in 2006 days


#2 posted 01-25-2017 08:52 PM

I find that I often suffer from “Analysis Paralysis”, where I spend so much time trying to think of how to make something that I never actually get to the part where I start making it.

Alternatively, if I do start making it, the minute that the real project begins to deviate (and it always will) from the “perfect” design I had in my head, I get frustrated and discouraged.

It’s taken a lot of time and a lot of self-reflection to figure out these things. Now, I usually make the project fit the materials I have, within reason. E.g. I look at whatever wood or sheet goods I have on hand and think “what does this want to become?”

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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MrUnix

7502 posts in 2736 days


#3 posted 01-25-2017 08:57 PM

Never built anything from published ‘plans’... most of my plans are drawn on the back of an envelope or napkin and evolve over the life of the project as needed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#4 posted 01-25-2017 09:04 PM



... drawn on the back of an envelope or napkin and evolve over the life of the project as needed.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Brad, I think envelopes and especially napkins simply catch the tears that overflow from the mind’s eye!

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Jeff2016

115 posts in 1401 days


#5 posted 01-25-2017 10:04 PM

+1 for the never used published plans. I just sketch out what my minds eye sees, and work from there. For parts I’m not sure of, I use construction material scraps. If it works I have a template, if not I make the changes needed and feed the scrap to my wood burner.

I’m sure that plans might make the process faster, but I am a hobby wood worker so it’s all just time well spent in the shop to me.

I tried sketchup but I like to spend my limited free time in the shop rather than the office.

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

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pintodeluxe

5998 posts in 3350 days


#6 posted 01-25-2017 10:15 PM

I like the plan, for me a 3-D rendering, to coexist with the cutlist. I don’t make a separate cutlist, but rather jot the overall length and shoulder-to-shoulder length on the drawing. Since I am only designing for my own needs, it makes it really nice.

Add a few exploded joinery views, and it all makes sense.
I have always been in favor of a detailed plan.

Thanks

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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johnstoneb

3131 posts in 2709 days


#7 posted 01-25-2017 10:16 PM

I use sketchup, published plans and the back of an envelope. To me most of the time a plan is merely a guide that I make changes from.
I hope I never get to where I can only follow a plan.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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gargey

1013 posts in 1312 days


#8 posted 01-25-2017 10:23 PM

Psh. I plan as I go. One piece at a time.

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GR8HUNTER

6558 posts in 1249 days


#9 posted 01-25-2017 10:25 PM

I never ever follow a plan to the tee …... I am changing it to suit my building capability’s …. and or tools that I own ….. That’s my 4 cents …. :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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a1Jim

117745 posts in 4114 days


#10 posted 01-25-2017 10:28 PM

I think I may have used someone else’s plans once I usually do a quick hand draw drawing if it’s something I need to keep track of a number of measurements and details but most the time I just get a photo of something similar from my customers and their requirements and build it from there especially if it’s something easy like a table or most case work. My students are always asking for plans or bringing in plans many of them have very poor joinery and designs and are not accurate. Places that have built the project themselves are much more reliable, places like Woodsmith.

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runswithscissors

3080 posts in 2562 days


#11 posted 01-26-2017 01:23 AM

The problem I have with cultists is that they assume that each piece is going to be cut individually out of a board of certain dimensions. But often, one may be buying or working with boards that may be much longer or wider or thicker than the plans require. So the problem becomes how to make use of this material in an efficient way—getting as many pieces out of the stock as possible, while avoiding waste. I realize some people can probably work this way with no difficulty, but my mind doesn’t work like that. So I often make up the plan as I go (after either sketching it out, or with a simple project, planning in my head. Part of that mental process is rehearsing how I will make the individual parts, how to dimension them, and what kind of assembly steps are going to work best.

I become impatient with Fine Woodworking’s step by step plans because they not only tell, but picture, steps that should be self evident. Ex. Measure for and cut the mortices; measure for and cut the tenons. Using appropriate clamps and glue, assemble the parts with the tenons pressed into the mortices. (Not a direct quote, obviously).

Well, duh. How else would you do it?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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ArtMann

1441 posts in 1353 days


#12 posted 01-26-2017 01:39 AM

Some projects I have taken on in the past were just too difficult or complex to build “by the seat of my pants”. You have to have drawings anyway if you are designing for a customer from a photo or a verbal concept. It is just too risky for them to be able to say “that is not what I had in mind”.

Sketchup has become so familiar to me that it is easier than developing enough details on envelopes or napkins.

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Woodknack

12924 posts in 2917 days


#13 posted 01-26-2017 02:04 AM

Many woodworkers never really learned Woodworking, they learned how to use tools. I learned that projects are a collection of joints and that’s where our education should begin. Traditional joinery accounts for wood movement. Once you understand how to connect the pieces you can build anything. Drawing a plan or sketch helps to save time and reduce waste while allowing design tweaks before bringing blade to wood.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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runswithscissors

3080 posts in 2562 days


#14 posted 01-26-2017 02:06 AM

I found myself unable to design the top (main part) of my C-top roll top desk using ordinary methods. The only way I could do it, making sure I had dimensions for the panels right, for example, was to draw it out full size. I then worked from that full size drawing. Even used it as an assembly guide.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2946 days


#15 posted 01-26-2017 02:40 AM



Never built anything from published plans … most of my plans are drawn on the back of an envelope or napkin and evolve over the life of the project as needed.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Have to admit I have alot of such drawings laying around the shop. Plans are great and for those that like working with them, more power to ya. Me, the napkin does great and I have had no complaints from anyone I made something for…. LOL. YET.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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JoeinGa

7741 posts in 2544 days


#16 posted 01-26-2017 01:48 PM

PLANS??? Awww geeze man. Now I’m gonna hafta worry about MATH, and ANGLES, and MEASURING, and all that stuff?

Why’d ya wanna go and bring up all that high school terrors all over again!
.
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#17 posted 01-26-2017 01:54 PM

 
Once I have nailed down a particular design in my head, having visualized all the pieces, I like to put pen to paper, or cursor to screen. I like to use MSPaint, as I am free to do whatever I want, and it’s free!
 
I’ll draw simple elevations (side and front) and a plan view of what’s in my head. I use the largest square under the BRUSH tab to establish the scale of my drawing. Sometimes this is an inch, sometimes the square is a 1/16th of an inch. It all depends on how detailed I need to be. You should give this a try … it’s a lot of fun! Anyway, once drawn I isolate each part to be laid out on the drawings of the material to be used … rotating and moving around to get the best use of the material.
 
This is the drawing used for my Arts and Crafts Style Prie Dieu build: 
 
       
 
I milled the black oak and hackberry boards to the required dimensions with finished edges on both sides. Once I had the parts placed where they needed to be … I simply went to town cutting them out!
 

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waho6o9

8785 posts in 3114 days


#18 posted 01-26-2017 02:01 PM

Plan your work and work your plan.

Good thread

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LittleShaver

597 posts in 1156 days


#19 posted 01-26-2017 02:13 PM

Most of the time, my plans are rough sketches and overall dimensions on a 3×5 card or post-it note. when I do need a little more detail, graph paper. My wife’s idea of a plan is a picture of a portion of the item. I’ve built a couple of things from purchased and downloaded plans. None of them escaped modification. Sometimes it was to change the size, others, to change the joinery, sometimes, to match the stock I have on hand.

Where I have spent some time is on cut lists. The wife wanted interior shutters for the house. Need to shutter 6 sets of sliders and 4 windows. Went with bi-fold design and 3 panels for each, all pegged mortise and tenon joinery. With 360 pieces to keep straight, I spent hours coming up with cut lists and color coded tags to attach to each piece (stapled to end).

-- Sawdust Maker

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Dan Wolfgang

176 posts in 1344 days


#20 posted 01-26-2017 02:14 PM

This is an interesting thread. I’m not sure it’s particularly relevant, but my 7-y/o son was putting some Legos together, following the instructions for a new set from Christmas. He does pretty good with them on his own but occasionally runs into trouble and needs help. Most often the trouble is that he’s deviated from the instructions slightly—placing a piece one block over, for example—and he then gets upset that he can’t complete the instructions as they’ve been laid out. Sometimes it’s a mistake and he needs help to figure out what went wrong and correct. it. Lately, however, it’s more common that he says he decided this piece would instead be better over in this spot. That’s fine! I tell him that it’s ok and fun to deviate from the instructions, but he needs to understand that everything else won’t fit as the instructions say.

Some rough plans are always good; polished plans are definitely better. Not worrying about following either of those precisely is best. You’ve got to roll with the work and be ready to adapt! At least for me, the benefit is recognizing how something may better fit for you (perhaps stretching a bookcase width to fill an area you have available) or adapting to a mistake. And, let me tell you, those adaptations from mistakes are very common for me!

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builtinbkyn

2961 posts in 1477 days


#21 posted 01-26-2017 02:20 PM

Like so many things, this probably comes down to a personal preference for the average hobbyist/craftsman. Some projects are simple enough to not require anything on paper. Others, though more complicated, are viewed in the mind’s eye by knowledgable craftsmen and can be realized with little difficulty. And yet others work as an artist might, (though some do start with sketches or even structured drawings) and let the project shape itself. And then there’s others who may want to construct a period piece which require exacting details or even something of their own design that requires those details to be worked out on paper and then followed or failure may ensue.

I guess many have done all the above on one project or another. Shop drawings are necessary when transferring the build to other hands. There’s no doubt about their need. The intent of the designer is difficult to understand without drawings. And, even with drawings, things can and do evolve when construction starts. A better way or some unrealized detail may become evident once the craftsman is in the process.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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JayT

6307 posts in 2748 days


#22 posted 01-26-2017 02:33 PM



The problem I have with cultists . . . .

- runswithscissors

I have lots of problems with cultists, not usually involving woodworking though. :-)

Not picking on you, scissors, but sometimes a small typo can totally change how you read a post and my warped sense of humor couldn’t resist.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#23 posted 01-26-2017 02:40 PM

The problem I have with cultists . . . .

- runswithscissors

I have lots of problems with cultists, not usually involving woodworking though. :-)

Not picking on you, scissors, but sometimes a small typo can totally change how you read a post and my warped sense of humor couldn t resist.

- JayT

But then again … are not those whack-a-dos on Birds of a Feather cultists? LOL!

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000

2859 posts in 1436 days


#24 posted 01-26-2017 02:51 PM

A lot of things can be built out of you head. Coffee tables, chests, dressers, etc. etc…

Someone made a comment that they would rather be in the shop working than in the office.

To me, time is short and I need to be as efficient as I can be while I’m in the shop.
Once you familiar with any drawing program it doesn’t take much office time to layout a project.
And besides, it makes my head hurt trying to figure out every angle or joint.
Drawing it before hand and having a picture with measurements assures that my time in the shop will be positive and I won’t be remaking pieces parts because I overlooked something.

I have never bought a set of plans to make anything, and I have made plenty of projects with a napkin sketch.
But now, I rarely go into the shop without a drawing of what I’m building.

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PPK

1544 posts in 1346 days


#25 posted 01-26-2017 03:52 PM

I really enjoy the drawing process, so I end up drawing more than I need to. Have I ever built something from a plan and actually followed it? I think once, when I was 12 years old…

For me, the process of drawing helps me to think through the details. It forces me to plan the joints, get an idea of proportions, plan what thicknesses of lumber to purchase, etc. After I’ve built the project, I usually go through and red-line my “plans” so that I can build the project again if need be. And this step really isn’t all that necessary, either, since the design came from my own head, and it’s not like I’m going to have troubles doing it a second time!
And finally, I think I have yet to build two identical items, since every person has their own tastes and preferences.

Cut lists? Good way to waste lumber. They are good if you are making box cabinets and there’s lots of standards and repeats. And they are good for ESTIMATING how much lumber to buy. But then, you need to verify each and every peice you cut, NOT follow the cut list, or else you’ll be re-cutting your lumber and wasting…

-- Pete

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Mainiac Matt

9348 posts in 2865 days


#26 posted 01-26-2017 04:51 PM

I am a mechanical engineer and have years of experience designing industrial shipping containers and packaging. So being proficient in both Auto-CAD and SolidWorks adds a significant skill set to the table. But this proficiency took hundreds of hours (fortunately paid hours) to develop.

Another aspect of my work is that if I (or one of my guys) puts a print and cut list on the floor that can’t be easily fabricated with the machines and tools our various shops have available, or if it is overly fussy to accomplish, we get an earful from either the shop supervisor or the production manager. So I train my guys to “build it in you mind….every cut, every detail… think it through from A to Z… BEFORE you submit the package for review”

That is the #1 failing of the designers and draftsman who work for me. The guys who are handy and grew up working with tools and helping their dads build things have a distinct advantage. The guys who invest all of their spare time playing video games have a much harder time of it.

I also have access to a CNC router at work, and I do hobby metal working and have a bench top mill and metal working lathe. So of course, I design in a way that brings all of these resources to bear.

That said, I solid model most all of my own projects and detail every feature exactly. But there’s a catch here… as I have had to learn when to cut and fab. to the exact dims, and when to transfer geometry from other parts and cut to fit.

That’s the way I do it, because that’s who I am. I don’t declare myself a superior woodworker because I do it that way… but I often have to listen to others scoff that I’m not a “true” woodworker because I don’t limit myself to the “normal” woodworking methods that other hobbyist have. I just do what I do and share for whoever’s interested. I don’t compare myself with others and I certainly don’t cry in my pillow for want of others approval.

I’m like Popeye, I yam what I yam and that’s all that I yam!

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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dmo0430

67 posts in 1539 days


#27 posted 01-26-2017 05:27 PM



I really enjoy the drawing process, so I end up drawing more than I need to. Have I ever built something from a plan and actually followed it? I think once, when I was 12 years old…

For me, the process of drawing helps me to think through the details. It forces me to plan the joints, get an idea of proportions, plan what thicknesses of lumber to purchase, etc.
....
- PPK

This is why I draw. I may not even draw a full set of plans. ATM I’m building a cabinet for my wife’s fishtank and the parts I drew out go together much faster and cleaner because of a little more forethought than when I’m in the garage and want to see this part go together. I’m sure that in the end there’s a mixture of plans and no plans. There has to be a general level of realism and “construct ability” to the plans anyway. When there isn’t they get ignored.

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Woodknack

12924 posts in 2917 days


#28 posted 01-26-2017 05:45 PM

I’ve enjoyed drawing since my first drafting classes in HS and often draw things I’ll never build.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#29 posted 01-26-2017 05:52 PM

True Story -
 
Back in the late 1980s I worked for a cabinet shop where the sales department and drafting room were housed in a two-story tower in the middle of a massive warehouse. The drafting room was on the second floor with a view of the entire shop. It was not uncommon to have several projects going on at the same time from a $500K architectural casework job to a $500 bathroom remodel for a local car dealership. We (draftsmen) created shop drawings and placed them in racks outside the shop foreman’s office. He would then place them on the individual team leader’s bench.
 
I got the wild hair one day to create a drawing a kin to:
 

The drawing spanned the width of a 24” x 36” page. Fully dimensioned, notated, cut-listed, the whole nine yards! I placed the drawing in the rack, returned to the drafting room … and watched as the drawing made its way to five different benches before the foreman snatched it up, stomped up the stairs, burst through the drafting room door asking, “What the hell is  this!”
 
Thanks be to God it was a slow day!
 

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TungOil

1343 posts in 1032 days


#30 posted 01-26-2017 06:43 PM

I can say that I have never built anything from published plans and I never create cut lists.

For design work, I float between several methods, sometime combining more than one.

Most of my work is from a simple perspective sketch with a few overall dimensions. This is my favorite method by far- it’s fast and gets me to building quickly. I use this when I’m building things that are simple in design or where I have well established construction methods already (like casework).

If I’m unsure how the proportions of a finished piece will look, I often make a series of scale sketches on graph paper. sometimes I sketch the whole piece, sometimes it will be just a detail, sometimes both.

Some projects warrant drawing out full scale in AutoCAD or Sketchup.

Here’s a current example: I’m currently designing a dining room table. My first pass at the design work was done to scale on paper. As I am getting deeper into the design work, I’m realizing that the clearances needed to fit the commercial slides I want to employ are very tight and due to the complexity of my table top I’m leaning towards having some routing templates cut by CNC to be sure everything will actually fit when I’m done. So, at least for the top, I’ll be drawing it up in AutoCAD as the next step.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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oldnovice

7504 posts in 3904 days


#31 posted 01-26-2017 10:36 PM

After 40+ years of design and manufacturing I have come to rely greatly on CAD and later on 3D modeling.
So I guess I am somewhat abnormal because I use a 3D CAD modeling program for nearly all my projects as it allows me to “build” the project before I cut anything.
The CAD program allows me to check for “clashes/cleanses” and provides me a drawing of each part.
Of course, my shop work is not limited to wood as I also play around with metal, plastics, and a lot of electronics.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Tony_S

1027 posts in 3620 days


#32 posted 01-27-2017 12:21 AM

I stare at blueprints and cad drawings enough throughout the day.
No plans for me.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#33 posted 01-27-2017 01:36 AM

 
Mention was made above of having to follow drawings to the letter … I had the pleasure of using some historical drawings while working at Herndon Lumber and Millwork in Gainesville, Virginia in the early 1980s. We won the contract to replace the eaves on the Pension Building, in Washington, D.C. This is a copy of one of those drawings (currently hanging in my study), the original resides in the National Archives.
 

 
This old blueprint is fascinating in its precision and detail. Especially when you take note of the 3rd October 1884 drawing date. This crown moulding consists of three different pieces, measuring over 20 inches tall. We had to match parts exactly. It was quite a challenge, but way cool!

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Dave Polaschek

4201 posts in 1119 days


#34 posted 01-27-2017 12:43 PM

I’m a mere beginner, but for me, part of the fun is heading to the lumber yard and picking through the bargain bin, and coming home with something I have no idea how I’m going to use. I have a couple projects going right now. One is a new shop stool, which had no drawings, but I made a cardboard and coat hanger ¼size model so I could see if the legs looked right. One is a cane for a friend who saw the one I made for myself and asked if I could make one for him, so I’ve built a prototype before. Another future project is a chisel-till to hold my chisels. I’ve got all the lumber for that (thank you, bargain bin!) but don’t have the designquite finished in my brain, so I haven’t started cutting.

So no paper plans for me, but I tend to either build a model or prototype, or have a very detailed mental picture. And with that, I’ll put together a cut-list if I need one.

For me, shop-time is its own reward. I was out there the other night, and stalled on my shop stoool (waiting for a new brace to arrive so I can drill the holes for the staked legs), so I started ripping a piece of ash in half for two canes. My rip wandered (oops!), and I ended up with only one piece long enough for a cane, but I decided to split it instead of finishing the crooked rip. Then I spent an hour cleaning things up with a spokeshave and I think my friend will get a much more interesting cane than originally planned (probably stronger, too), plus I’m getting a lot better with a spokeshave, more quickly than planned, and got a very solid evening’s practice in reading grain.

I might make more paper plans as I get more skilled, but for now, playing with my wood in my garagenous zone (as my sweetie puts it) amuses me, and I’m learning a lot by “winging it.”

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#35 posted 01-27-2017 05:27 PM


... a new shop stool, which had no drawings, but I made a cardboard and coat hanger ¼size model …

- Dave Polaschek

Dave – Nothing wrong with a 3d plan !

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WillieMcCoy

11 posts in 1036 days


#36 posted 01-27-2017 06:52 PM

War plans are torn up after the first shot is fired.

I draw out plans for most projects, mostly because I enjoy the process. But I usually change them after the first cut.

-- ...but down home they call me Slim

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runswithscissors

3080 posts in 2562 days


#37 posted 01-27-2017 08:24 PM

Reflecting on what others have said above, I should add that I sometimes build a model when a simple drawing doesn’t tell me whether a design is going to work well. We did this with our kitchen remodel. I made scale models from poster board (manila file folders work well) of stove, fridge, sink, and pantry, and placed them inside a box of the same dimensions (to scale) as the kitchen space.

It’s a way to tell whether drawers are going to open properly, whether doors will clash, etc. It’s also a way to evaluate proportions such as height, width, and depth. 1/4” foam board works well for larger spaces or items.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#38 posted 01-31-2017 02:19 PM

  Newbie Challenge (and I hope those of you new to woodworking will give this an honest try)
 
Identify the parts needed to build the following:
 
             

Once identified, determine (and be able to justify) the dimensions of those parts.
 
Remember, there are no wrong answers (unless you are way off! In which case I’m sure someone will point that out). It’s your stand and you can make it any size you would like!
 
 

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000

2859 posts in 1436 days


#39 posted 01-31-2017 02:24 PM

Nice table, I would like to give it a try, can you e-mail me the plans?

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#40 posted 01-31-2017 02:28 PM



Nice table, I would like to give it a try, can you e-mail me the plans?

- jbay

NO … LOL!

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JADobson

1446 posts in 2648 days


#41 posted 01-31-2017 04:30 PM

It all depends on what I want to build. For instance, I built this box with just a few ideas in my head, developing it as I went with the help of a few quick sketches on scrap to help visualize things.
Click for details: Jewelry box 2

This one came from a published plan in Strother Purdy’s Traditional Box Projects. I came across it in the book, thought my mother-in-law would like it so I build it. Definitely made some stylistic changes along the way but the dimensions and overall design stayed the same.

Click for details: Another Jewelry Box

Right now I’m just finishing up a fairly complex project that I drew in sketchup. There are some tricky joints and a lot of very small components and so I made a full digital drawing that could be disassembled and measured and examined. For this project it has been helpful. For the previous ones it would not be necessary. (Hopefully I post this new project within a week or two).

Edit: Not sure why the widget isn’t working properly in the first link.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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TheGreatJon

348 posts in 1770 days


#42 posted 01-31-2017 05:04 PM

Nicola Tesla invented AC power generation, the radio, remote controls, wireless power transfer, lasers, and a freaking earthquake machine (among many other things)... all without ever putting pen to paper. Granted, the man was a super-genius and most of us mortals do better when we jot a few things down, but how much information, and what kinds, completely depends on how your brain works and if you plan on making multiples. I personally feel that one-offs can easily be done without plans, because there is no reason to learn from your errors or to ensure that the copies look identical.

On the other hand, if Tesla had written some stuff down, earth might look like a sci-fi movie by now. It took 63 years before some MIT students managed to replicate his wireless power transfer experiments!

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

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PPK

1544 posts in 1346 days


#43 posted 01-31-2017 05:28 PM

Ron A – I’ll bite! I’m not a professional by any means, but I’m not exactly a newbie either, so if I don’t count, you can throw out my “plan.”

I’ll choose to make it an end table for my chair that I’m making. Height of the arm rest on the chair I’m making = 25”. I want my end table same height so I can reach over and grab my lemonade, so height will be 25.”

Overall dimensions of table will be 25” tall by 12.5” wide by 12.5” deep. Dimensions determined by proportion of 2:1 height to width.

Material list:
Legs (4) 1-1/16” square X 24-1/4”
Skirt boards (4) 3/4” thick X 2-1/2” X 8-1/4”
Table Top (1) 3/4” thick X 12-1/2” square
Corner blocks (4) 5/8” thick x 2-1/8” x cut to size (45-degree angle)
Figure 8 fasteners or clips.

Rationale:
Legs: 1:12 ratio of leg width to table width.
Skirt boards: 1:10 ratio of table height to skirt board width. Length determined by measuring between table legs.
Table top: 2:1 ratio of table height to width
Overhang of table top (1-1/16”) (need to be determined for skirt boards): 1:1 ratio of leg width to overhang. Also, 1:12 ratio of width of table to overhang.
Corner blocks: Don’t overthink it. They are not visible and serve only to reinforce…. ;-)
Figure 8 clips: install underneath so that wood top can expand/contract with seasonal movement.

-- Pete

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#44 posted 01-31-2017 05:43 PM

Pete, of course you count! Thanks for taking the time … different construction method from what I would choose and two more pieces, but like I said it’s your stand!

I find it interesting how differently we approach this simple table. Again, THANKS for taking the time with the exercise!

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

401 posts in 2537 days


#45 posted 01-31-2017 05:46 PM

I find working from someone else’s plans a bit boring, though I pore through lots of pictures and google image searches for ideas and inspiration. I am constantly re-inventing the wheel, which is horribly inefficient, but this is a hobby for me and enjoying myself is the goal, not the most efficient or always even the highest quality production possible. I also really like trying new things, and often move on the something new before getting terribly proficient at the old thing.

-- Ted

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3080 posts in 2562 days


#46 posted 01-31-2017 08:59 PM

If the wheel hadn’t been reinvented numerous times, we’d still be driving around on sawed off log rounds.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7504 posts in 3904 days


#47 posted 02-01-2017 12:36 AM

Not to take anything away from a brilliant man ….. or to hijack this forum …. but …..
Not to be picky, TheGreatJon but Tesla did not invent the radio and made no contribution to the development lasers.
He was more concerned about wireless transmission of power not comminication.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Willy Cordero's profile

Willy Cordero

82 posts in 1605 days


#48 posted 02-01-2017 01:46 PM

I am the worst draftsman you can imagine and therefore I always work without plans, the design and everything else is done in my head and when it is a project a little more complicated, what I have is a very basic sketch with the rough most important measures. It almost always works, but there are times when I’ve wanted to have better drawing capabilities.
I have no problems visualizing my projects in my head, but putting them in paper or on a screen it is almost impossible for me, and i have tried a couple of computers programs too, but with the same result: instead of spending time on trying to do it, i just jump on my project

-- Willy, Costa Rica/Brasil

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1184 days


#49 posted 02-01-2017 01:59 PM



I am the worst draftsman you can imagine and therefore I always work without plans, the design and everything else is done in my head and when it is a project a little more complicated, what I have is a very basic sketch with the rough most important measures. It almost always works, but there are times when I’ve wanted to have better drawing capabilities.
I have no problems visualizing my projects in my head, but putting them in paper or on a screen it is almost impossible for me, and i have tried a couple of computers programs too, but with the same result: instead of spending time on trying to do it, i just jump on my project

- Willy Cordero

Thanks, Willy! Looking at your bench build, I think your methods work quite well. I had to grin at your comment … ”It almost always works.”

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

30458 posts in 2875 days


#50 posted 02-01-2017 03:20 PM

I will share my information with anyone who asks. But I don’t work from drawings.

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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