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View Jacob Manning's profile

year 10 project

by Jacob Manning
posted 02-09-2010 10:59 AM


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127 replies

127 replies so far

View Enthalpy's profile

Enthalpy

44 posts in 4122 days


#1 posted 02-09-2010 12:09 PM

Spelling and grammar would be a good start.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 4449 days


#2 posted 02-09-2010 01:35 PM

So you’re 15 years old in the tenth grade and this is your last year of school? You actually aspire to be a carpenter? You must build a 2 holer in order to graduate and become a carpenter! LOL

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118162 posts in 4658 days


#3 posted 02-09-2010 07:23 PM

Jacob
What impresses employers is a good attitude and willingness to work hard. But some nice photos of impressive projects can’t hurt. I would say look at projects listed under projects and pick one that you think you can build with what you you know now and the tools you have available and go for it. You know everyone here is willing to help even the grumpy ones.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10880 posts in 4196 days


#4 posted 02-09-2010 07:37 PM

I´m with a1Jim
and may I suggest one
of the smaller projects
so you have time
enoff to make it
a eyecatcher

Dennis

View lew's profile

lew

13353 posts in 4836 days


#5 posted 02-09-2010 08:08 PM

Jacob,
Do you want to specialize in finish carpentry or rough construction. There is a big difference, so the project you choose should reflect your future plans. If you plan on rough construction, you could build mock-ups of stairs and rafters- both of these show your ability to understand the more complex knowledge of building construction. If you plan to take the finish carpentry route, a small desk or table with a drawer would probable work nicely. Make something with the best finish you can produce, to show off the highlights.

Hope this helps.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View KayBee's profile

KayBee

1083 posts in 4327 days


#6 posted 02-09-2010 10:20 PM

Jacob You’re in NSW-that’s Australia, right? Try the apprenticeship programs. They most likely have standards you’ll have to meet but so does a real job.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118162 posts in 4658 days


#7 posted 02-09-2010 10:24 PM

Kids or others may not even try unless we encourage them, whether you just starting woodworking or you are “just rebuilding your stash of tools”.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10880 posts in 4196 days


#8 posted 02-09-2010 11:20 PM

well spoked a1Jim
he found L J and he will learn and he asked what more do they want
Dennis

View miles125's profile

miles125

2180 posts in 5086 days


#9 posted 02-10-2010 12:00 AM

All good woodworkers started out making crap. So i vote you concentrate on making some crap this year and get that out of the way :)

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2104 posts in 4809 days


#10 posted 02-10-2010 12:13 AM

what kind of work have you done before? That will help people to answer you as well. Jim has some great suggestions/advice though.

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 4165 days


#11 posted 02-10-2010 12:26 AM

Jacob, when I first started in shop class I was 13. We made a small bench and a shelf, then we were allowed a project of our own, mine was a chess board that I still have.

What ever you chose to do consider doing handyman repair projects around your Mom’s house and friends. Take before and after pictures even if it was simple as fixing a fence or screen door. Ask for little notes of reccommendation from whoever you work for.

Just remember always do your best at whatever you do. That doesn’t mean what you do may look perfect or be right. It just means your did your best at that given point in time. I often come across something I did many years ago like that chess board. Sure I could do much better now than I did 44 years ago. But you know at that point in time what I built was perfect and the best I could have done as everything I have ever done since.

Come back often, you know where we all are, we’ll be glad to help.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View Mark's profile

Mark

1817 posts in 4355 days


#12 posted 02-10-2010 01:24 AM

well for…

1) use proper spelling and grammar on this site don’t talk like some teenage punk
2) stand proud for who you are and what you’re getting into
3) to learn this trade its takes criticism so if someone sounds like they’re insulting you, they’re just making you stronger
4) you’re always learning no matter how experienced you get even from the inexperienced
5) theres no such thing as a stupid question so ask away

as for my first tip for you: design your project before you build it as a guideline

-- M.K.

View cstrang's profile

cstrang

1832 posts in 4249 days


#13 posted 02-10-2010 01:59 AM

My advice is to pick something at your current skill level, but don’t be afraid to challenge yourself! Try making a few smaller projects at first and then move to a bigger item. If you build something, post it on Lj’s in your projects section, you can add a link on your resume to your page on Lj’s and use it as a personal portfolio. If you are going to attach a link on your resume I would correct any spelling and grammatical errors, potential employers look for this kind of thing. If there is anything else don’t be afraid to ask, we are all here to help. Welcome to Lj’s.

-- A hammer dangling from a wall will bang and sound like work when the wind blows the right way.

View MrsN's profile

MrsN

988 posts in 4607 days


#14 posted 02-10-2010 02:30 AM

Have you talked to your teacher? Most wood shop teachers have a pretty good idea of projects that you can complete at your skill level, and would likely know locally how you can get into your desired career,whether that is an apprenticeship, tech school or whatever.
You don’t say what you have made in the past so it is hard to know what your interests may be. I tell many of my students to make something that parents will use. Knowing that whatever it is has a specific purpose, and a “client” in mind helps them focus on getting it done and getting it done well.
Put your best effort into your project, whatever you decide. And post project pictures when you are done, I can’t wait to see what you come up with.
Mrs. N

View grub32's profile

grub32

215 posts in 4129 days


#15 posted 02-10-2010 02:33 AM

First of all, I would say that you definitely need to identify what work you wish to accomplish. Either way, you are going to need to learn from a professional on how to do the job with efficiency. You need to show a strong work ethic. He who hires you will certainly want you to do it their way anyway.

As for making an impression, I suggest making something that certainly has multiple elements, such as drawers and casework if your skills allow. Also, it would be nice to add in some molding with some compound miters if that is in your skill set, as carpenters need to fit complex angles into their work.

About the grammar and spelling. This is not a job interview, a spelling test or a college thesis. I am appalled that you guys are chastising a young kid for mistakes that you most certainly have made yourself. At least he has taken the initiative to ask for help in starting a hard working career.

By the way, this text entry field has spell check, but no grammar check.

Good Luck Kid,

Grub

-- Educator by Day, Wood Butcher by Night!!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20812 posts in 4757 days


#16 posted 02-10-2010 06:55 AM

When you give a potential employeer a resume, spelling a grammar are the first impression. it counts.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 4165 days


#17 posted 02-10-2010 07:08 AM

Come on guys throw the kid a bone. All of us have posted remarks with gramer and spelling not good.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View Luke's profile

Luke

546 posts in 4375 days


#18 posted 02-10-2010 07:41 AM

Book shelf. Check out Kostas versions. They’re great and easy for you. Good luck

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20812 posts in 4757 days


#19 posted 02-10-2010 08:21 AM

There are a lot of grammar errors, spelling errors and typos on here. I do them. I don’t see the “English Police” monitoring this site. We have been asked about forwarding this youngster’s career. Communication skills will be a very important part of it. Especially after he is established and trying to make presentations to win contracts.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View John Gray's profile

John Gray

2370 posts in 4966 days


#20 posted 02-10-2010 09:11 AM

Study you math too, YOU WILL NEED IT!!!!!!!
Make sure you know how to read an rule and a tape measure down to 16ths, 32nds, and 64ths. Learn to read a micrometer and vernier caliper. Make sure you can read blueprints and plans!
And do some work on reading and writing, handwriting, and verbal skills you will need all three of these communication skills in you work.
And as someone else said above ”have a great work attitude”.

-- Only the Shadow knows....................

View cathyb's profile

cathyb

844 posts in 4325 days


#21 posted 02-10-2010 09:17 AM

Geez, give the guy a break! He didn’t say, “I’m interested in becoming addicted to Meth because everyone is doing it.” Nor did he say,”I want to join a gang and commit a few crimes to prove that I’m a tough guy.” He ask for support from people who love working with wood. We were all “Jacob” at some point-try to remember…...

Speaking as a mother and an artist, this is my advice to you:it doesn’t matter what you make; what matters is what you make of yourself. This is a tough line of work. You will get hurt. You will be criticized – maybe not fairly. You will struggle to make ends me. You will work overtime to create pieces that you don’t care for. You will go it alone, because with the all the headgear and noise, you can’t carry on a conversation with anyone. You will slowly loose your hearing. Your lungs will load up dust. You will find woods that you’re allergic to, which will send you off to the emergency room. In the end, none of that matters, creating art from wood is a gift and it will change you. Forget about trying to impress people that is a fools game. Best of luck to you…....

-- cathyb, Hawaii, www.cathyswoodworking.com

View mission76's profile

mission76

47 posts in 4704 days


#22 posted 02-10-2010 09:27 AM

Relax a bit…it reads like English might be his second language. If this website was in Spanish I would be Jacob!!

View mmh's profile

mmh

3684 posts in 4803 days


#23 posted 02-10-2010 09:28 AM

Pay attention to details. Spelling, diction, punctuation, how you dress and present yourself are all details you need to take in account to help you give a good impression to people you meet, in person, on the phone or online. If you are rushing through without taking in account the details of presentation and workmanship, you will not go far. If you show that you have the patience to attend to the details of how to do something right, people will notice this and be more impressed with your diligence and patience than a big project or flashy presentation.

Start small, do excellent work. This will make people stop and admire you and your work. Start big, do shabby work, this will not get a second glance. You end up looking small and remember that your first impression is a lasting one.

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20812 posts in 4757 days


#24 posted 02-10-2010 09:33 AM

Remember, English is the language of economic opportunity.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 4376 days


#25 posted 02-10-2010 12:36 PM

Jacob,
First- Welcome to LJ’s !!

It is nice to hear that you have already chosen a profession.
You must really love working the wood.
For your first big project I would suggest a project that incorporates
a few separate skills. Like something you could cut curves w/bandsaw, maybe a bit of
router use, and some type of simple joint skill.
This would show multi task shop skills.
Good luck, and remember in life there are always a few who will try to bring you down.
Be strong and stand tall : )

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View john's profile

john

2389 posts in 5462 days


#26 posted 02-10-2010 12:47 PM

Hi Jacob !
Think big , act big and look big ! , most of all try to be original ! Try not to follow everyone else .

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , https://www.facebook.com/groups/extremebirdhouses/

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10880 posts in 4196 days


#27 posted 02-10-2010 01:13 PM

hey relax a little guys
he isn´t so bad at all
go and se what he just posted under project
and give him some kredit
he has deserved for
the smile he makes on
your face he is qeit good
on a lathe and that is way
more than some off the
other I have seen here
not to miscredit anyone
but he desrve to be here
he found the site and ask
for help in wood not how
to spell welcome him as you normaly do
he maybee young but that has nothing
to do with woodworking

Dennis

View Dennis Fletcher's profile

Dennis Fletcher

467 posts in 4135 days


#28 posted 02-10-2010 03:08 PM

I saw your project and to tell you the truth, I would hire you straight away to work with me, based on that. You have skills, you just need them honed, as do we all.

If you want to be a carpenter, first find some material to learn about design in construction. This will enable you to look at blueprints and decipher them, adding just one more skill that your future employer will be glad of.

Then learn how a house goes together, or a building. Study it, memorize it, make it as a passion, then perform it, little by little, until you are able to do more than most. Unfortunately, this takes years to accomplish, but it is a goal you should set for yourself.

I agree with furthering your education, though. Go into college, take construction management or architecture, working for a carpenter at the same time, maybe part time or in the summers. This will give you better skill sets and allow you to have an easier job when your body begins to tire of the hammer swings.

Lastly, make sure you build a project that is appropriate for the job you are trying for. If you are going to be a framer, frame up a mock house, maybe an elaborate dog house that uses all of the framing techniques a house would take. Make sure they can see that you can build a wall with a window opening and can cut a rafter.

Lastly, enjoy what you do.

-- http://www.ahomespecialist.net, Making design and application one. †

View shack's profile

shack

114 posts in 5156 days


#29 posted 02-10-2010 05:02 PM

Jacob, first off DO NOT LISTEN TOO THE MORONS THAT PICKED ON YOUR GRAMMER!!!!!
The others gave you great advice, I will say this follow your passion put your heart and soul into it.

AS FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO ACTED CHILDISH TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT YOUR SELF AND YOU WILL FIND FLAWS OF YOUR OWN, WE SAW THEM IN THE WAY YOU TREATED THIS KID. SHAME ON YOU.

This is a great web site with some outstanding people and in my opinion we do not need your kind here to bring things down. I am sure you moma taught you long ago if you cant say something nice dont say anything at all. I am sure she would be ashamed of you now!!!!!!

-- JohnShackleford,North Carolina

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2475 posts in 4121 days


#30 posted 02-10-2010 05:46 PM

Follow your dreams, we all have enough regrets in our lives. Anyone who says otherwise is lying(correct spelling or not?) who cares!! Be the artist you want to be!!!

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View Benji Reyes's profile

Benji Reyes

340 posts in 4159 days


#31 posted 02-10-2010 05:59 PM

Hi Jacob, welcome to LJ. I see you have posted your first project. Congratulations! Keep on working on different projects. This is one way you’ll learn if you really have the knack for woodworking or not. Once you get hooked to it, you will never call it a job but more of playing and earning a living from it. Be honest to yourself Jacob and never let negative thoughts or comments affect your life nor work. Never call yourself a craftsman unless you are called one by your peers and patrons, then the title is given to you. Always practice humility. All the best to you Jacob. Say hi to the roos for me!

BTW.. I started woodworking when I was 22.

-- Benji Reyes, Antipolo, Philippines, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Benji-Reyes/88321902103?ref=ts Instagram benji reyes

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 5180 days


#32 posted 02-10-2010 06:07 PM

Jacob – Wherever you are there is very likely a career trades or vocational program in the school system. Apprenticeship programs would be a good way to go, you will be held to specific training standards.

Do as good as you can in math. I am using math everyday.

Do you see yourself running your own business in the future? Learn the trades and take business classes too. Some people are destined to be employees (nothing wrong with that) and some people are destined to run their own business (doesn’t make them better people.)

Working a few different places will give you a variety of experience and viewpoints.

In a bad economy everyone can suffer. I know engineers that can’t get a job, it is not only carpenters that are out of work. But I can tell you that often when people can’t afford to build a new home, they will do remodel, when people can’t afford to remodel, they will do repairs on their house. If they can’t afford to do repairs on their house – they have a lot bigger problem to worry about than the door or window not closing properly so they aren’t hiring anybody any way.

I certainly admit that I have had a rough go the last 2 years with my remodel business, but I am still here working and I know lots of other people out of jobs that have college degrees. These things are just a part of life.

Nobody is immune to being layed off or losing work but there is a way to help insure your best chances of keeping a job or your business going. Build a solid reputation for having integrity, doing qaulity work, being a hard worker, being reliable, and being creative.

Good luck.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

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Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 5180 days


#33 posted 02-10-2010 06:12 PM

I should also let you know that I am self-taught.

I did not get into the trades until I was 32 and I never had any training or exposure to the trades previous to that time. I never had any prior interest and I did not even own any tools other than a small hammer, screw driver, and pair of pliers.

Look at my portfolio now.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View patron's profile

patron

13718 posts in 4422 days


#34 posted 02-10-2010 06:14 PM

jacob ,
welcome to LJ’s .

i remember og , when he first brought fire to the cave ,
everybody was afraid .
and clonkus , when he invented the wheel ,
nobody wanted to bother .
and look what they did for galileo ,
locked him up in a tower .
and all those guys that wanted to fly.

my hat is off to you ,
do whatever you need to attain your dream ,

let them laugh ,
they will be proven wrong as always !

i wanted to be a woodworker all of my life ,
but as i didn’t have any experiance ,
nobody would hire me .

i finally learned in a federal penitentiary !
and i had to fight for that too .

that was 45 years ago !
i still make mistakes everyday ,
i am still learning .
who knows ,
maybe i’ll do something today ,
or tomorrow ,
that might help someone like you .

i sure hope so !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View LittlePaw's profile

LittlePaw

1572 posts in 4159 days


#35 posted 02-10-2010 06:44 PM

Jacob, whatever your reason(s) for leaving school, I urge you to think and rethink. Consider finishing at least high school. I learned the hard way that life is full of options – either YOU pick the options or OTHERS pick it for you. By finishing HS, you improve your options just because you demonstrated a healthy resolve to complete something important. Employers won’t hire people who give up when things get tough. To drop out is easy, and a step in the wrong direction. I didn’t finish college (had 3 yrs) and took a really great sounding job instead. Go married and had two kids. The job went south after 6 yrs. So, with a wife and two toddlers and without a degree, my “options” on good jobs were so limited that more doors were closed to me than open. The employers had all the options and I wasn’t one. By comparison, if I had finished a degree – any degree – I could have had the options to pick my career path. So, Jacob, why be in such a hurry to leave school? Carpentry jobs will still be around when you finish HS. Besides, if you keep working at it, your woodworking skills would only be much better – making you a more qualified hire at that time. You’re not there yet. Whatever you decide, Jacob, I wish you the very best.

-- LittlePAW - The sweetest sound in my shop, next to Mozart, is what a hand plane makes slicing a ribbon.

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2475 posts in 4121 days


#36 posted 02-10-2010 06:50 PM

From his homepage. he is probably from Austrailia? New South Wales(guessing). They may not go to school for 12 years like in the USA. Hence his mentioning Year 9? & year 10?.

He is NOT necessarily dropping out of school. Maybee thats all the schooling they require where he lives. as for going after a degree, Maybe the nearest college is 1000’s of miles away?

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View lumberdustjohn's profile

lumberdustjohn

1263 posts in 4247 days


#37 posted 02-10-2010 06:55 PM

Jacob,
Welcome to lumberjocks!
Everyones idea is different as of what to see made.
That’s why this site is so successful.

Build what you like to make and do it the best that you can.
As the years pass you will be amazed of the changes you make as your knowledge increases.

Thanks for sharing your post, look forward to seeing more.

-- Safety first because someone needs you.

View Todd46's profile

Todd46

58 posts in 4131 days


#38 posted 02-10-2010 07:10 PM

Jacob

First off all you guys give the kid a break on spelling & grammer, give him CREDIT for comming on here asking for advice!!!!! we should welcome him with open arms, we need some young blood in the trade I am 46 yrs old a union carpenter by trade since 1982 ,I served the 4yr apprentice program,I worked in the feild till 2000nI am 3rd generation carapenter in my family & president of our General Contracting CO.
i am very proud i have choosen to be a union carpenter,there are so many options I have worked all over the midwest South & FL ,1 Applebees in Portland OR,several remodels in VA ,100’s of Hardees remodels & new stores
I have my G-c Lincese in several states including FL (hardest in the country to get)
I cant believe some of the comment to this young man from those so called fellow woodworkers! ! ! ! !
Jacob if you feel so strongly about being a carepenter GO FOR IT!
( & if my grammer isnt correct those can kiss mine )

-- [email protected]

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5777 posts in 4313 days


#39 posted 02-10-2010 07:25 PM

Jacob,

Unfortunately I am not a professional woodworker, but a hobbyist. However the professionals that I know typically do the following types of work.

#1. Cabinets. Perhaps building a Kitchen island or the like with some nice details would grab some attention. #2. Turned pieces, bowls, platters, scoops etc… #3. Tables. End tables, coffee tables, etc… #4. Lamps.

I would suggest that you study, study study the various designers, and styles of furniture, cabinetry, architecture etc… that you may want to pursue. Part of the job of a woodworker, unless you are simply a paid monkey that merely runs wood through a saw, is to be a designer as well… Develop that internal feel and eye for design and it will serve you well…

If there are apprenticeship programs where you are, you would do well to serve an apprenticeship. It is a truly miserable thing that here in the U.S. apprenticeships are so rare these days… Young fellows just starting out don’t have the opportunities that the older generations did…

I looked at your posted project, and I must say so far, especially for someone as young as you, that you have some skill there, and a fair eye for the design, just fine tune it with study and experience and you will do great things.

Don’t let the haters hold you back!

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View Todd46's profile

Todd46

58 posts in 4131 days


#40 posted 02-10-2010 07:32 PM

Jacob if you can join the carpenters union
you will have 4 yrs of apprenticeship program

-- [email protected]

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 4165 days


#41 posted 02-10-2010 07:42 PM

As a Proud former Union Carpenter for 12 years let me say be careful. My local here sent me out on one trim job of worth in all that time. Typicle Union jobs here in Oklahoma back then was scaffold work at local power plants, refineries, or concrete form work.

While all of this was good experience it was never anything I was interested in.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View lou's profile

lou

344 posts in 4523 days


#42 posted 02-10-2010 10:38 PM

hi jacob.i say ,start by building something you feel you can handle.then as time goes on, you will gain more experence and will build bigger and better things.you will learn as you go,and will enjoy the process.all the best to you.

View bamf's profile

bamf

7 posts in 4124 days


#43 posted 02-10-2010 10:42 PM

Some of you folks are really a joke! This young man is asking for some help or ideas and you’re busting his balls for his grammar?! I’m a Gereral Project Superintendent for a General Contractor, and I’m guessing that some of the jerks that are being so critical of this young man for his spelling would NOT make it through the day before I sent you packing home due to a lack of quality and or production. Maybe the people that I’m addressing are just so damn perfect that they are entilted to make such comments. I’m truely disapointed in the humanity in some of these postings!
Keep your head up kid. Being a carpenter is a sexy profession. There’s nothing as special as working with your hands createing things. Screw those people! When you are 18 email me about a job.
BAMF!

-- Jerry, Montana

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bamf

7 posts in 4124 days


#44 posted 02-10-2010 11:40 PM

not sure where you live, but I surely do NOT endorse the “union”. The unions are getting weaker and weaker. They are for the old and the slow. They will teach you to be lazy! Merit pay!!!!! It’s the American way!

-- Jerry, Montana

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patron

13718 posts in 4422 days


#45 posted 02-10-2010 11:48 PM

he’s in new south wales , australia .
down sydney way .
i googled gov. trade schools there ,
the gov. has a great trades program ,

2.5 billion pounds worth !
and he can transfer from school ,
and continue his education while getting a trades degree .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View bamf's profile

bamf

7 posts in 4124 days


#46 posted 02-11-2010 12:01 AM

I’m not sure where you live, but I surely do NOT endorse the “union”. The unions are getting weaker and weaker. They are for the old and the slow. They will teach you to be lazy! Merit pay!!!!! It’s the American way!

-- Jerry, Montana

View john's profile

john

2389 posts in 5462 days


#47 posted 02-11-2010 12:04 AM

Lazy and framing don,t go together very well !! :)

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , https://www.facebook.com/groups/extremebirdhouses/

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 4165 days


#48 posted 02-11-2010 12:49 AM

Bamf suffers from post stutter.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View mafe's profile

mafe

13188 posts in 4170 days


#49 posted 02-11-2010 12:59 AM

Hi,
I think all of you who are not talking nice to the young guy should be ashamed!
I think it’s wonderful to see the will, and that he have the currage to try and ask, even it seems to be a tough one to try.
I have been lucky in my life, I never meet these people during my time.
When I was young I dropped out of school, I even started to drink, but at the age of 25 I took a choice to do something, and I dit.
I became a constructing architect, and after a Building architect from the Royal Danish Academy of fine arts.
Worked as a architect, then started to teach and after only few years teaching I became the head master of the school of constructing architects in Copenhagen. I had 120 emplyess and 1200 students under me.
So where do I want to go?
First of all don’t ever give up my friend.
Second you can do what you want, the sky is your limit.
I never learned how to spell, as you can see, but my secratery did…
Now I’m sick after a big operation, and finally ready to follow my big dream -
not to be a architect, not to spell perfectly, not to listen to the others – but to smell, feel and shape that wonderfull wood, that I was teaching about before.
Go for it, and write to me directly if you need help or just a supporting word.
Love, Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

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papadan

3584 posts in 4449 days


#50 posted 02-11-2010 01:11 AM

It would be nice if he would come back and clarify his original post. If he is 15, he is not ready to finish school or start working as a carpenter or anything else.

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