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View mandatory66's profile

Plane then sand?

by mandatory66
posted 09-06-2016 04:49 AM


17 replies so far

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 1049 days


#1 posted 09-06-2016 06:01 AM

This will vary in degree depending on the wood species, sanding tends to open the grain, planing/jointed edges tends to close/compress it by the nature on downward pressure to cut it.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3389 posts in 1774 days


#2 posted 09-06-2016 04:00 PM

I’ve been having good luck on walnut for example using a card scraper to get a really smooth finish that doesn’t require any sanding. In once case, i used sandpaper to remove an old finish then used the scraper to get it ready for finishing. I am sure that the type of wood will make a difference but on walnut it was amazing how good the wood looked after using the scraper.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3394 posts in 1867 days


#3 posted 09-06-2016 04:12 PM

Plane or scraper only for me.
:-D

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1872 days


#4 posted 09-06-2016 04:25 PM

For me, I’ve tried finishing after both sanding or planing and found planing to let’s the figure shine through a bit better in general.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9487 posts in 1525 days


#5 posted 09-06-2016 06:03 PM

Smoothing plane, then scraper, then – depending on the type of wood and the grain structure – sandpaper if necessary.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Don W's profile

Don W

19201 posts in 2954 days


#6 posted 09-06-2016 11:47 PM

Test, test, test. We call it a Proof of concept in the technology world.

Because YMMV.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7788 posts in 3300 days


#7 posted 09-07-2016 01:25 AM

Depends on how many nicks are in the planer blades, and/or how used are your spiral head cutters on your jointer. All said and done, YES, sanding/scraping is more likely needed unless you have NEW blades/cutters.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1872 days


#8 posted 09-07-2016 01:29 AM



Test, test, test. We call it a Proof of concept in the technology world.

Because YMMV.

- Don W

Pretty much. Find what works.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2299 posts in 2376 days


#9 posted 09-07-2016 01:40 PM

Define “rougher finish”. If you mean tool marks, ok, but if the tool edge is not cutting smoother than 200 grit you need to sharpen a lot more often, or you are getting tear out. I sand with 320 to roughen a scraped or planed surface if the sitiuation requires it.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5934 posts in 3200 days


#10 posted 09-07-2016 03:16 PM

It really depends on how you are doing the bulk of the milling. With helical head planers, it has changed my mindset on this. The Shelix head on my planer leaves a surface that is almost ready for finish. I sand with 120 and 150, and that is it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3320 posts in 3163 days


#11 posted 09-07-2016 03:32 PM

I rarely sand but when I do, the coarsest paper that I use is 220 and that would be after I wipe the wood with water to get the feather up. Usually, I use 400 – 600 and go down to 1500 for finish before using pumice and rottenstone for final.

If it has inlay, you don’t want to sand – ever, use a scraper.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View mandatory66's profile

mandatory66

202 posts in 2517 days


#12 posted 09-08-2016 07:54 PM

I see a few answers address using motorized planers & joiners, my question may not have been presented properly. I was asking if many people use sand paper after smoothing a table or board with a hand plane, I am not referring to plane tracks or dull blades or blades with chips in the edge. I can get the board super smooth with the hand plane but when I apply a finish to the board it seems a little rougher than if I had sanded the board. I am using a LN #4 for planing & do not usually need a scraper. (so I think)

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3389 posts in 1774 days


#13 posted 09-08-2016 08:28 PM

My understanding is that card scrapers were often used as the sole method of preparing wood surfaces for finishing prior to the early 1900’s. Sandpaper was available before then but not commonly available and likely too expensive for most wood workers. I have also read that in the right hands you can achieve a superior finish with a card scraper but on some woods at least, the surface may be too good and might not take a the finish very well. In that case, lightly sanding after card scraping may yield a more durable finish. In my limited experimentation with a card scraper on walnut, the wood had such a sheen that it almost looked like I had already applied a very light coat of wipe on varnish after scraping.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3320 posts in 3163 days


#14 posted 09-10-2016 12:07 AM

Use a wet rag and wipe the board down after you plane it smooth. This roughens the boards – lightly sand that smooth.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

198 posts in 1213 days


#15 posted 09-12-2016 03:45 AM

Depends on the finish in my experience and how well your plane is setup. If you have a glass smooth surface and you plan on using BLO and shellac you’re golden and the translucence of the grain will be blinding. However if you are using a finish that depends on surface adhesion I’d probably give it a very light scuff with 220.

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 2497 days


#16 posted 09-12-2016 01:04 PM

It depends…

I’ll often give important surfaces a swipe with 320, not a “sanding”, just a swipe or two. This will reveal areas that need further attention with sandpaper or a scraper by leaving a bit of powder in the roughness.

On surfaces that won’t be seen, I often do nothing, leaving it right off the planer or drum sander.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2298 posts in 2756 days


#17 posted 09-12-2016 03:51 PM

If it’s a smaller piece, like a rail or stile, I’ll often hit is with a #4 and possibly a scraper and call it good for finish. Any time I’ve done something bigger, like a table top or something, I may give it the once over with the ROS at 220, since I don’t want to scrape all of it (laziness).

I just finished prepping four 11.5”x48” shelves from hickory. I sent the four through the electric planer (I know that’s not what this topic is about) filled the few tearout spots with CA Glue, ROS 150-180-220 and they’re ready for a clear WB finish. The hickory has a lot of changing grain and is prone to tearing out easily, the shelves are made from bookmatched pieces, so the grain isn’t all going the same direction on one panel, so I opted to prep them with the ROS. Had it been something like maple, I may have been more confident with the hand planes, but I don’t have a huge arsenal of them (2 #4’s, a #5, a #7, router plane, and some blocks).

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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