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All Replies on Help with bonding a spring with a bolt?

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View Leonardo's profile

Help with bonding a spring with a bolt?

by Leonardo
posted 09-04-2016 12:36 PM


28 replies so far

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1406 posts in 2578 days


#1 posted 09-04-2016 12:38 PM

Picture might help.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View Leonardo's profile

Leonardo

8 posts in 1172 days


#2 posted 09-04-2016 12:46 PM

Sorry, apparently it didn’t go through the first time.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3688 posts in 2399 days


#3 posted 09-04-2016 01:47 PM

I would weld them together or use silver solder. Silver solder will take a lot of heat unless you use a tig welder then you can localize the heat effected area. From the picture I’m seeing a steel spring and a stainless screw. If that is correct then a weld will be the best method, I would prefer tig welding it but a mig weld would be okay to. Either way you will need some 309 welding wire and some Trimix welding gas. That’s is how I would go about attaching the two. Any way you choose don’t quinch the work piece it will screw up the spring and the weld let it air cool.

View Leonardo's profile

Leonardo

8 posts in 1172 days


#4 posted 09-04-2016 03:45 PM

Thanks for the reply. I just have to make sure the bond is easy to do fast and cheap since this will be needed to be repeated hundreds of times. Also I can’t have any residue on the side since this will go inside a tight fitting whole. I’m considering welding it but I think gluing would be easier but I don’t know if there is a glue fit for this. If there is i’d prefer gluing since that’s a much easier and more of my level method. (I don’t do much welding so if I can go about not doing it it would be better.)

Thanks

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8787 posts in 3119 days


#5 posted 09-04-2016 04:00 PM

http://www.thistothat.com/cgi-bin/glue.cgi?lang=en&this=Metal&that=Metal

Tig it, save that, if not good luck gluing it and Welcome to Lumber Jocks

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7505 posts in 3910 days


#6 posted 09-04-2016 04:36 PM

Try Bondic!
It is pretty amazing stuff!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1088 posts in 3673 days


#7 posted 09-04-2016 04:42 PM

Welding is the only bond that won’t fail.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6602 posts in 1255 days


#8 posted 09-04-2016 05:16 PM

LumberJocks NOT Metaljocks

LMAO …...Welcome 2 LJ’s

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7741 posts in 2549 days


#9 posted 09-04-2016 05:18 PM

JB Weld. It’s some dang strong stuff !
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2028 days


#10 posted 09-04-2016 05:50 PM

Have someone weld it. They probably won’t even charge.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1801 posts in 3401 days


#11 posted 09-04-2016 06:02 PM


... I just have to make sure the bond is easy to do fast and cheap since this will be needed to be repeated hundreds of times. ...

- Leonardo


Have someone weld it. They probably won t even charge.

- TheFridge

Fridge, someone might do one or two free, but hundreds is gonna cost him…

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12928 posts in 2922 days


#12 posted 09-04-2016 06:35 PM

I’m sure it’s obvious but put a big heat sink on that spring or the heat could ruin it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1441 days


#13 posted 09-04-2016 06:48 PM

Instead of a bolt, could you use a piece of all thread that would screw into the spring?

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1872 posts in 2859 days


#14 posted 09-04-2016 07:28 PM


Instead of a bolt, could you use a piece of all thread that would screw into the spring?

- jbay

This is the first thought that came to my mind as well. The only thing I’d do different is to thread and glue a nut 1/4” from one end of the threaded rod. Then the spring could be glued or brazed to that 1/4” protrusion.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7505 posts in 2741 days


#15 posted 09-04-2016 08:38 PM

If you don’t have a welder, find a friend with something like this:

Use it to get the job at hand done, then keep an eye out on CL for a nice used model for cheap. It’s like a hot melt glue gun, but for metal :)

For what you are looking at doing, you don’t need as big of one as shown above – a little 90A model that runs on 120v would be more than enough (like this one at HF for under $100).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View clin's profile

clin

1070 posts in 1538 days


#16 posted 09-04-2016 11:24 PM

Correct welding would no doubt be the strongest, but I’m not sure form your description how strong it needs to be. What type of torque will exist between the spring and bolt.

Also, if you could shape the end of the spring such that the spring wire bends sharp at the end and comes right across the center, like cutting a circle in half. Maybe that could fit into the slot of s slotted bolt. The idea is this would handlr the primary torque forces and the glue or weld is pretty much there to keep it from falling off.

-- Clin

View Leonardo's profile

Leonardo

8 posts in 1172 days


#17 posted 09-04-2016 11:56 PM

Thanks everybody for all the replies!
I will try welding. There’s no escape from it. It’s clearly the best method. I’m lucky since my dad already has a tig welder. I will only need to buy a thinner welding wire since the application is small. And will need to build a nice jig to support it while welding. I’ll keep you posted.
Thanks!!!

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8787 posts in 3119 days


#18 posted 09-05-2016 12:02 AM

Awesome, make a couple of extra ones if possible.

View Leonardo's profile

Leonardo

8 posts in 1172 days


#19 posted 09-05-2016 12:03 AM

I’ll need hundreds!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7505 posts in 3910 days


#20 posted 09-05-2016 04:55 PM

Just take a look at Bondic, it is very strong, easy it is to use (UV cure plastic), and how fast it is.
Apply Bondic, expose to UV (a UV source included), and you are done!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Leonardo's profile

Leonardo

8 posts in 1172 days


#21 posted 09-05-2016 04:57 PM

But isn’t it just for plastic? it doesn’t seem to be for metal?!

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

23554 posts in 3648 days


#22 posted 09-05-2016 09:34 PM

I would first flatten the end of the spring so it is square with the body and then fixture them in line is a piece of wood and braze the joint with a torch. The wood may burn up a bit but if it does the job of alignment, who cares.
I mention alignment because if they are not aligned very well, you will get binding on the inside of where ever it is going.
It will be permanent!
If you lived close, I could do it for you!

Oh, I missed that you need hundreds. I would still braze them because welding might pull to one side and cause mis alignment, BUT, I would make a steel fixture.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Leonardo's profile

Leonardo

8 posts in 1172 days


#23 posted 09-09-2016 01:42 AM

Thanks for the tip jim. I made a jig to support them so they’re straight with each other while soldering.
So my dad works as a jeweler and in his job they have this heatless solder machine that costs 5000 and he was able to get a great bond out of it. He was planning on buying the machine for himself and after I told I needed to get hundred’s done he bought an used one. He’s gonna use for his own stuff and he will let me use it while he’s not using it.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7505 posts in 3910 days


#24 posted 09-09-2016 05:19 AM

Leonardo, please explain “heatless” soldering!
I have used all types, including resistance soldering, but never heatless!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 1204 days


#25 posted 09-09-2016 05:39 AM

It anit a bolt, it is a machine screw, a hole is round and is something you put something in, “whole” is all encompassing/complete!
Good luck with it.

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

421 posts in 2958 days


#26 posted 09-09-2016 06:41 AM

What are you going to do with this when joined ?

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

View Leonardo's profile

Leonardo

8 posts in 1172 days


#27 posted 09-09-2016 01:10 PM

lol, ok. I just learned it’s not heatless but it’s pretty much the least amount of heat needed to solder the piece. It’s a precise welder use in things like jewelering. It’s called PUK 4.

Ahhh, so it’s not a bolt. hmm. Now I know the difference.

It’s going to be used on a guitar capo that I make. Basically the spring with the screw will allow the spring to have adjustable tension.
As you can see here. https://www.amazon.com/Wooden-Guitar-Flamed-Bloodwood-WoodenK/dp/B019PTYDAE/ref=lp_13634169011_1_1?srs=13634169011&ie=UTF8&qid=1473426620&sr=8-1

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

23554 posts in 3648 days


#28 posted 09-10-2016 01:07 PM

It must be low temp solder, but it seems that the metal parts would need a fair amount of heat to have it adhere.
Is this your machine?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slWaJZJq8sk

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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