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View harlantk's profile

Paper as a template issues

by harlantk
posted 09-02-2016 08:35 PM


11 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3928 posts in 2352 days


#1 posted 09-02-2016 08:41 PM

I use 3m77 spray adhesive for scroll saw and other things like gears and do not have that issue. I have measured it a clue of times. I also use blue tape on the wood and put pattern over it.

Just as a note, I a l so check my printer to make certain that I am not getting distortion. I use an inkjet and use inkjet paper.

Good luck

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7361 posts in 2563 days


#2 posted 09-02-2016 09:24 PM

3M spray adhesive here as well… 77 is good stuff, but expensive – if you don’t need to glue foam, rubber and other weird stuff, the general purpose #45 is cheaper and works just as well – and I’m sure the other brands do too. Never had any issues with the template changing size. If I print out an 8×10 portrait template (I always put a 2 pixel border around it so I can cut to size, which make placement easier), it comes out exactly 8×10. After application of the glue, it remains 8×10 and fits my plywood blanks perfectly.

Paper is just ordinary off the shelf copier paper and the templates are printed out on a laserjet. I used to put down a layer of packing tape first, but lately have just been applying directly to the wood. To remove, just wipe what’s left of the template with some Mineral spirits, wait 30 seconds or so, and it peels off in one piece easily.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1817 days


#3 posted 09-02-2016 09:39 PM

I use rubber cement in the little jar with a brush. That aside any wood pulp paper will stretch when wet. Try a sheet of Tyvek. It’s waterproof, cheap, and shouldn’t stretch at all.

You could get a cheap (<$200) laser to put down your cut marks:

Repeatable and accurate.

M

-- Madmark - [email protected] Wiretreefarm.com

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12778 posts in 2744 days


#4 posted 09-03-2016 02:34 AM

Simplest solution is reduce your print by .008%.
Use less glue.
Switch to spray or stick glue.
Switch to a paper with high rag content.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View MaurerPower's profile

MaurerPower

21 posts in 1014 days


#5 posted 09-03-2016 05:26 AM

Stick glue still has the same problem. I’ve noticed a little stretching in my scroll saw patterns when I use elmers stick glue. Btw crazy art glue sticks don’t stick very well. Like Rick said, try paper with high rag content or maybe the think paper that you would print your resume on.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1423 posts in 2475 days


#6 posted 09-04-2016 12:58 AM

Use packing tape and tape it down. Punch a few holes in the middle where it doesn’t matter so you have holding power throughout the pattern.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View harlantk's profile

harlantk

3 posts in 996 days


#7 posted 09-04-2016 12:59 AM

Wow thank you all, for such quick replies here. Definitely some food for thinking here, not being familiar with Tyvek, but think it probably is similar to the Mylar drafting film in application.
I see I should have been a bit more specific, and my focus was more on the pulp products, and the thought Rick gave of trying higher and different rag content is something I should explore for sure. I have not tried the 3M #77 as yet, and shall pick up a can next time I am at the store. I really appreciate the thoughts here, and I will post findings as well as I test materials. I have a project coming up that is 1.5 meters long and the goal will be to come in around +- 0.2 mm.
great forum Community!!
Thank you very much

Tim

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1817 days


#8 posted 09-04-2016 03:23 AM

0.2 mm over 1500 mm? (1 part in 7500!) Are you working with wood? That is an incredibly tight spec (0.013%) that will NOT hold over time …

M

-- Madmark - [email protected] Wiretreefarm.com

View harlantk's profile

harlantk

3 posts in 996 days


#9 posted 09-05-2016 04:05 PM

You are correct MadMark, that this will not hold over time let alone climate variations. This expectation is applied to a mould or form, and pushes the limits of the printing device as well. Use of the Mould is then later checked for change due to environment, and if possible adjusting accordingly. The concern here is to find a way to “start” as accurate as possible, then work as accurate to the mould accommodating any difference’s. I am aware that the materials could never possess the rigid accuracy expected, but to incorporate other deficiencies on top of the material issues, has been an issue over the years.
I appreciate your thoughts and taking the time to question this requirement, and the knowledge you are bringing to the issue I am researching here.
I will keep this thread related to the simpler aspect of just the paper creep and the related problems of the material stretch from moisture causing problems.
I ran across a web page showing the use of freezer paper in the printer, then rubbing the ink off directly to the wood, and this might be interesting to try.
Again thank you for the response and the input.

Tim

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12778 posts in 2744 days


#10 posted 09-05-2016 09:33 PM

Correction to my post, it should have read:
”...reduce your print by .8%.”
That’s what I get for posting late evening.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5440 posts in 3607 days


#11 posted 09-06-2016 11:53 PM

You can try a silk screen stencil and just print the image on the wood; Very accurate, but more effort.

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