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View PaulHWood's profile

side drawer slide shims

by PaulHWood
posted 08-30-2016 02:43 PM


11 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5355 posts in 2821 days


#1 posted 08-30-2016 05:08 PM

It would help to know what kind of slide and how much you think you have to shim it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jayseedub's profile

jayseedub

139 posts in 2477 days


#2 posted 08-30-2016 05:17 PM

Bandsawn shim
Cardboard from soda 12-pack
Aluminum can
Handplane shavings
Polycarbonate sheeting
Flat-head screws along the length, adjustable in/out to amount needed (creative, huh!?)

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

457 posts in 2765 days


#3 posted 08-30-2016 05:22 PM

KV TT100 Economy 100 lb Full Extension Drawer Slide by Tru Trac (Woodworkers Hardware)

a piece of corrugated cardboard worked so we are talking 1/16” or so. Drawers work, but when fully extended, they lack contact on one side so you could potential twist them. alignment is good and when shimmed with the cardboard (not ideal) solved the problem.

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5542 posts in 2863 days


#4 posted 08-30-2016 06:52 PM

Run some 1/16” strips off on the table saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 1355 days


#5 posted 08-30-2016 07:45 PM

Go to Starbucks and ask them to save a few of the spent gift cards. They don’t absorb water and are easy to drill and cut. And they are free—well you will probably end up buying a cup of coffee—so not exactly free.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View joek30296's profile

joek30296

53 posts in 3378 days


#6 posted 08-30-2016 08:05 PM

Plastic laminate (formica) is about 1/16”. I have used it in the past for exactly the same reason you need to.
It won’t compress and it’s waterproof.
Just my 2 cents

-- "There are two theories to arguing with a woman....neither of them work"

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

457 posts in 2765 days


#7 posted 08-31-2016 04:22 PM

thanks, good ideas all.

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

457 posts in 2765 days


#8 posted 08-31-2016 04:23 PM

Flat-head screws along the length, adjustable in/out to amount needed (creative, huh!?)

yes actually very creative

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 1355 days


#9 posted 08-31-2016 04:32 PM

If you only need a few thousandths of an inch then iron-on white edge banding would work. You can cut it with a scissors and iron it on until the screws are in place. If you need more thickness you can apply to both sides of the box. I don’t know about stacking the plastic stuff, but the birch or red oak stuff that they sell at the big box stores can be stacked.

I usually make my drawers at the high side of the dimensions. So I am sometimes a bit tight but never a little loose.

If it is too snug, I simply run the drawer through on my table saw with the blade set to the hardware height. I can set the blade to take as little as 1/64” of an inch.

If the piece is way oversize, which has not happened yet, I would take a little off both sides. I use a rip blade and it makes a very clean cut. I use solid wood for my drawer boxes and this would not work for plywood boxes.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5757 posts in 3005 days


#10 posted 08-31-2016 04:33 PM

I’ve used most of the stuff listed above, but mostly it’s the veneer edging that solves the problem for me.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1411 days


#11 posted 08-31-2016 04:38 PM

Creative, but I would rather have a flat pc of laminate backing the whole width of the guide instead of a screw head sticking out.
I actually take laminate and make a cut for the screw so that I can place the shim wherever a screw is and the guide will suck flat to the wall without tweaking the guide member.

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