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Fractal Burning (my attempt)

by splintergroup
posted 08-29-2016 04:01 PM


25 replies so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

6153 posts in 2806 days


#1 posted 08-29-2016 05:18 PM

Very interesting and unique!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3610 posts in 3724 days


#2 posted 08-29-2016 05:40 PM

Looks amazing, I kind of want to try it. I want to see this done to a huge slab of wood.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3002 posts in 1762 days


#3 posted 08-29-2016 05:47 PM

Thanks guys!

I agree with the test on a large slab. With Jim’s wands, that allow multiple start points, one could really go crazy burning a large slab tabletop.

I don’t see any hard limit to how far apart the electrodes can be, I’m thinking 4 feet probably will still work as long as there is a layer of conductive liquid (the baking soda mix).

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3223 posts in 2797 days


#4 posted 08-29-2016 10:03 PM

Splinter, I think you are on to something. I know you like A&C style, so you can make some of your “trees”, then inlay leaves on the trees and end with a panel that looks something like this. You may have just created a new art form!

-- Art

View ErikF's profile

ErikF

649 posts in 2784 days


#5 posted 08-30-2016 10:17 AM

This is cool

-- Power to the people.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3002 posts in 1762 days


#6 posted 08-30-2016 02:27 PM



Splinter, I think you are on to something. I know you like A&C style, so you can make some of your “trees”, then inlay leaves on the trees and end with a panel that looks something like this. You may have just created a new art form!

- AandCstyle

Nice stuff!

Wife.com does glass work so I’m thinking about a way to incorporate some of her work. She saw the Lichtenberg patterns done with glass and wanted me to try that. The problem is they use a particle accelerator to ‘burn’ the glass. I’d have to evacuate the neighborhood down range when I fired that contraption up.

View JimYoung's profile

JimYoung

330 posts in 2127 days


#7 posted 09-01-2016 03:35 PM

I saw this on “Outrageous Acts of Science.” Very cool effect.

-- -Jim, "Nothing says poor craftsmanship more than wrinkles in your duck tape"

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3269 posts in 2188 days


#8 posted 09-01-2016 09:17 PM

That is pretty cool!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

23544 posts in 3645 days


#9 posted 01-22-2019 03:41 AM

Nice work, Bruce! Are you using baking soda and water? Try vinegar and water. it mixes completely and does a real good job too. Those figures are really neat. I am going to do inlay into the deep grooves, but i don’t like to sand them because it removed some of the fine figures at the end of the pattern.

I was going to do a demo for our guild but they cancelled it because the AAW banned fractal burning because 4 guys got killed in the past two years. I redid my two burners with PVC handles high above the contacts and I feel pretty good about the setup now.

Cheers…thanks for the plug!.................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View rustynails's profile

rustynails

879 posts in 3069 days


#10 posted 01-22-2019 04:15 AM


Nice work, Bruce! Are you using baking soda and water? Try vinegar and water. it mixes completely and does a real good job too.

Jim what kind of vinegar are you using and what is the mixture / amount of vinegar to water? Also have you tried vinegar and baking soda together?

Thanks

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

564 posts in 3497 days


#11 posted 01-22-2019 11:46 AM

Cool-looking stuff, but if the linked story (and comments) are correct then this can be an extremely dangerous subtype of woodworking. Carpe diem…

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.detroitnews.com/amp/38900689

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View rustynails's profile

rustynails

879 posts in 3069 days


#12 posted 01-22-2019 01:03 PM

To many people are making there own to save money and getting hurt. I have one from Conestoga and they are a very safe unit.

https://conestogaworks.com/woodburners.html

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3214 posts in 2888 days


#13 posted 01-22-2019 01:09 PM

I guess dabbling in the dark arts (EE) has it’s advantages. Anxiously waiting to see how you incorporate this into your woodworking pieces. Like A&C mentioned – maybe time for some inlaid leaves and trees?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3002 posts in 1762 days


#14 posted 01-22-2019 02:51 PM



Nice work, Bruce! Are you using baking soda and water? Try vinegar and water. it mixes completely and does a real good job too. Those figures are really neat. I am going to do inlay into the deep grooves, but i don t like to sand them because it removed some of the fine figures at the end of the pattern.

I’m backed up now with some other work so I haven’t been back to playing. Vinegar is first on my list since you have had such great success 8^)

I’m still thinking on trying to make a “perfect” tree, just seems to be a natural end result.


I was going to do a demo for our guild but they cancelled it because the AAW banned fractal burning because 4 guys got killed in the past two years. I redid my two burners with PVC handles high above the contacts and I feel pretty good about the setup now.

Cheers…thanks for the plug!.................Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Sad to hear!

I understand not wanting to propagate something dangerous, but I believe in Darwin. Of course a spinning sharp blade seems to carry its own warnings whereas invisible electricity doesn’t.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3002 posts in 1762 days


#15 posted 01-22-2019 02:54 PM



Cool-looking stuff, but if the linked story (and comments) are correct then this can be an extremely dangerous subtype of woodworking. Carpe diem…

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.detroitnews.com/amp/38900689

- fuigb

Scary article! I wish they could elaborate on his setup as I’m always curious about failure modes. Nothing is ever fool proof.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3002 posts in 1762 days


#16 posted 01-22-2019 02:59 PM



I guess dabbling in the dark arts (EE) has it s advantages. Anxiously waiting to see how you incorporate this into your woodworking pieces. Like A&C mentioned – maybe time for some inlaid leaves and trees?

- EarlS

I did make a simple box a while back as a test to see if anyone was willing to buy something like that (they were 8^).

What I need to do is make a bunch of burns on blanks then cull through them to find a worthy set suitable for a project.

I’m not as brave as Jim, I can’t burn a finished project, I need to burn first and then decide if I can continue 8^)

View Woodchuckswife's profile

Woodchuckswife

30 posts in 1850 days


#17 posted 01-22-2019 04:10 PM

I just read about 2 guys getting killed last week doing that one was an electrician..
Chuck

View ajshobby's profile

ajshobby

103 posts in 2848 days


#18 posted 01-22-2019 04:31 PM

A guy my wife went to high school with recently died doing this stuff. We ran into his widow while we were back home for the holidays and had a long talk about what happened. Needless to say its interesting but not worth the risk to me. Be Careful out there for those interested in this stuff.

AJ in Mpls.

View rustynails's profile

rustynails

879 posts in 3069 days


#19 posted 01-22-2019 05:05 PM


I just read about 2 guys getting killed last week doing that one was an electrician..
Chuck

- Woodchuckswife

It’s not good that people are getting killed but did they use the proper safety requirements that these units demand? From what I have read the people have not. They recommend that your work piece is on a rubber mat and stand on one as well and using a pair of heavy rubber cloves. If you follow these rules and don’t try to jury rig a unit you should be okay. Just like any tool in the shop if you don’t follow the safety protocol you can get hurt or killed. As I have worked in a commercial cabinet shop and have seen people injured and killed for not following and respecting the tools safety guidelines.
I was at a show last summer wear a guy was demonstrating one that he made out of a microwave and he was following none of the safety guide lines and was being arrogant in his use of the system. I cringed while watching him demonstrate as there was so many people around and thought some one was going to get hurt. I questioned him about it and he just laugh and started to ark the unit and said see its safe?

Safety is your friend with all tools.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2468 posts in 3484 days


#20 posted 01-22-2019 05:29 PM

Our turning club had a demo. On a concrete floor. And some of the demonstrators were “knowledgeable” on things electrical. I refused to get within twenty feet of the mess.

Oh, and I played marine electrician at PSNS, electronics fabricator and repairman at Keyport, wired my entire house. . . .

Yes, it can be done, but I’d start with my 1” rubber floor mats, a wood bench, other than a microwave xformer (neon signs type, instead), one hell of an insulated handle (e.g., like the ones used for painter poles). . . .

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3002 posts in 1762 days


#21 posted 01-22-2019 05:33 PM

Dealing with high voltage in general does require some special considerations. Probably the one I’m most familiar with is keeping one hand in your pocket (basically to prevent you from contacting both poles of the HV across your chest).

One consideration I used is an isolation transformer which greatly reduces any risk from the HV traveling through your arm and out your feet. Many HV transformers are “auto transformers”. The key relevance here is that they are not isolated since the primary and secondary windings are electrically connected. This leaves the ground as a path for the voltage should you touch either pole. The isolation transformer is designed to eliminate this.

Another precaution I take is one of the HV poles is attached to the workpiece and I only use one hand to move and place the other pole.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2468 posts in 3484 days


#22 posted 01-22-2019 05:42 PM

The left hand, under the theory the current would not flow through your heart.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2165 posts in 1143 days


#23 posted 01-24-2019 12:27 AM



I was going to do a demo for our guild but they cancelled it because the AAW banned fractal burning because 4 guys got killed in the past two years.

- Jim Jakosh

Wait…..WHAT? Just when I thought a TS kickback was the greatest danger in the shop!

I saw a custom Fender Stratocaster done like this. Incredible effect but the potential death thing gives me pause.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

886 posts in 1516 days


#24 posted 01-24-2019 06:08 PM

There’s nothing Jim can’t do, everything he does is amazing

View Marc301's profile

Marc301

5 posts in 295 days


#25 posted 01-27-2019 02:23 AM

This is a super cool technique that I’d like to try someday. Can’t wait to see what else you make with it!

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