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View StDane's profile

Style/ethical question for large slab table

by StDane
posted 08-29-2016 01:50 PM


17 replies so far

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3320 posts in 3286 days


#1 posted 08-29-2016 01:59 PM

The way I look at it -

It is your wood, your table – who cares!

If this is a commission piece and he/she is supplying the wood, tell them of your concerns and ask what they want.

Once you splice the two, you will have to deal with the the structural aspects. For a seriously large slab, if it is not quarter sawn, you could get cupping once you get it thinner.

For the stump – be careful of bugs and critters hiding in it and dry it carefully and slowly to minimize splitting.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View StDane's profile

StDane

7 posts in 1344 days


#2 posted 08-29-2016 05:22 PM

It will be for sale, so I should at least consider the market expectations…if there are any. Maybe I’m over thinking it.

View JKMDETAIL's profile

JKMDETAIL

220 posts in 2165 days


#3 posted 08-29-2016 05:29 PM

Wow, Great idea.

Now somethings I would have to consider. Weight and mobility, a stump that size is going to be really heavy, dry or not. Next how do you get that inside most homes?

I would not be afraid to split and add a section to that slab. Might even consider a contrast type of wood.

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3604 posts in 3694 days


#4 posted 08-29-2016 05:31 PM

I would put something in-between the sections so it looks intentional, like a band of a contrasting color wood, or an acrylic pour, or even just an air gap. Maybe dovetail keys to stitch them together across a gap?

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1461 posts in 1734 days


#5 posted 08-29-2016 05:42 PM

The only rule would be broken is if you tell people it’s a single slab table. Pretty much every table I’ve seen is a glue up unless they say it’s a single slab.

I’ve taken live edge pieces and have ripped them to take out any severe cracks and have used matching wood to fill in the spaces.

If you don’t do a good job of matching it and the pieces really clash, then you’ve broken a rule of aesthetics for sure :)

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1409 days


#6 posted 08-29-2016 06:14 PM

I’ve come to learn that there are no rules in woodworking, just as long as it works and your happy.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3386 posts in 2307 days


#7 posted 08-29-2016 07:43 PM

I wouldn’t hazard a guess as to which one would sell better, but I would prefer the slab trestle table to one with stumps for legs. But that’s me . . .

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2356 posts in 3148 days


#8 posted 08-29-2016 07:53 PM

From a resort in the Smokies…

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1285 days


#9 posted 08-29-2016 07:59 PM

Stump for a base would be completely retarded, don’t do it. People won’t have space for their legs. On top of how mixing “slabs” would mess up the slabbiness.

Use the big slab, and make a trestle table. There’s a reason you don’t see stump bases on dining tables.

Note how uncomfortable (impossible) it would be to sit in front of the stump in the picture above.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3386 posts in 2307 days


#10 posted 08-29-2016 08:05 PM

that pic makes my point, I think.


From a resort in the Smokies…

- Ocelot


-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3386 posts in 2307 days


#11 posted 08-29-2016 09:04 PM

To be a little more serious, I know that a lot of folks like rustic furniture, and it could be that your slab is particularly suited to that kind of furniture.

I love the Nakashima-inspired pieces where the natural beauty/contours/grain/shape of the live edge piece is harmonized with interesting and beautiful woodworking. But what I like isn’t what everyone likes. And given what some folks are buying . . . who knows.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3386 posts in 2307 days


#12 posted 08-29-2016 09:12 PM

check out this hackberry piece: https://porterbarnwood.com/project/spalted-hackberry-live-edge-dining-table/

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1285 days


#13 posted 08-29-2016 09:23 PM

Steel beams underneaf?

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5227 posts in 4470 days


#14 posted 08-29-2016 09:23 PM

I’m of the opinion that YOU make the rules.
“And that’s all I’ve got to say about that…......”
Bill

-- [email protected]

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3386 posts in 2307 days


#15 posted 08-29-2016 09:29 PM

I wouldn’t use steel, but I like the overall look.


Steel beams underneaf?

- gargey


-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1591 posts in 4271 days


#16 posted 08-30-2016 03:04 AM

Last year, at a visit to Bell Forest Products in Ishpeming Michigan, I purchased a huge slab of Mappa (European Black Poplar). It was 7 1/2 feet long, almost two inches thick, and was 33” wide at the base and around 29” at the top. The slab had natural edges on both sides with a lot of inclusions and beautiful grain swirl.

After I got it in my shop, which required two guys to move it, reality began to set in. what was I going to do with this thing? Make two big coffee tables? No they would be too big for our house. How about a dining table? No. Not quite wide enough and we certainly did not have a place for such a huge occasional table. At the cost of this slab, cutting it up for smaller projects would be a waste of very expensive wood.

Could I cut this monster in half and glue in another type of wood to make it dining table wider? How in the heck could I rip something this big and joint the edges. I have a nice shop, but this is a bigger and heavier project – out of my capability.

The answer was…...I called Eric at Bell Forest and he graciously agreed to take it back and give me full store credit. It didn’t take long for someone in California to fall in love with this slab and that’s where it has landed. I wish this guy all the best.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View StDane's profile

StDane

7 posts in 1344 days


#17 posted 08-30-2016 03:36 PM

Agree about the size of the stump and sitting in front of it, that’s the whole point about making the slab bigger-I would gain about 10” of over hang. But, thinking now that maybe the trestle idea is better visually and keeps the aesthetic of the slab.

Thanks for the input everyone.

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