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View Schwarzwald's profile

care for wooden spoons?

by Schwarzwald
posted 08-27-2016 04:05 PM


7 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2657 posts in 2529 days


#1 posted 08-27-2016 04:49 PM

No finish at all! Whatever you put on will come off once stick it into something that is boiling. My wife washes her wooden spoons with dish washing soap at the sink and lets air dry. We buy new if they fall apart.

-- Bill

View Kirk650's profile (online now)

Kirk650

649 posts in 1143 days


#2 posted 08-27-2016 09:38 PM

From time to time I make a bunch of wooden spoons and spatulas. I’ve put various oils and potions on them (mineral oil, tung oil, walnut oil, etc.). I’d say that tung oil lasts a bit longer, but nothing lasts very long. But they do look good new, with a coat of oil, so I’ll keep doing it.

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1053 posts in 2324 days


#3 posted 08-27-2016 11:28 PM

I use half and half mineral oil and beeswax. Heat spoons in oven at 170 and apply several coats. Let cool then buff with cloth. Nothing lasts forever but this makes them look and smell good, and is good for touching up.

-- Quote from ebay tool listing: " Has nicks and dings wear and tear dust and dirt rust and pitting but in good working condition"

View ClaudeF's profile

ClaudeF

915 posts in 2102 days


#4 posted 08-28-2016 01:24 AM

I sand my cooking spoons down to 400 grit, then hold them under the faucet for a few seconds to thoroughly wet them. I then dry them with a hair dryer for 2-3 minutes. Re-sand with a piece of used 400 grit, re-wet, re-dry, etc. After about 3-4 cycles of this, no more fibers raise up from the water and the spoon stays smooth. I then coat it heavily in olive oil, since this is what I cook with. I have to re-coat it about once per hour as the oil soaks in. After leaving overnight, I just wipe it dry with a paper towel and throw it in the drawer.

Robson Valley, from BC CA heats his in the over at 200 for a bit so the olive oil will soak into the wood better.

If you are selling these, mineral oil from the pharmacy is a better choice as some people may be allergic to olives. Either way, that’s all I do to them.

Claude

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

View Schwarzwald's profile

Schwarzwald

3 posts in 1032 days


#5 posted 08-28-2016 06:53 AM

Awesome! Thanks so much for all of your replies!

-- I want to know

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1073 posts in 3212 days


#6 posted 08-28-2016 09:47 AM

Peter Follansbee recommends soaking them in raw linseed oil until they won’t absorb any more of the oil. I think this takes a few weeks. I generally use tung oil, applied the regular way.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View martyoc's profile

martyoc

44 posts in 1311 days


#7 posted 08-28-2016 03:37 PM

We several wooden spoons and they have no finish. They are many years old and have had a lot of use by my wife for cooking and canning and then are cleaned and dried in the dish washer. Have never had a problem.

-- Marty O'C

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