LumberJocks

All Replies on '84 Powermatic 66 - rust through - seeking advice

  • Advertise with us
View MaxBishop's profile

'84 Powermatic 66 - rust through - seeking advice

by MaxBishop
posted 08-21-2016 05:27 AM


42 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7358 posts in 2559 days


#1 posted 08-21-2016 05:51 AM

From the limited pictures, it looks like a pretty well abused machine. but it’s way hard to tell just by looking at the base. If you have any metalworking experience, it’s certainly fixable – I’ve seen some guys do amazing work with far worse. In addition to the rust and missing fence, how complete is it? It’s the missing stuff that will bite you. In addition to the sale price, add a couple hundred for a fence, maybe another fifty or more for a decent miter gauge. Don’t forget labor costs (if any) and supplies (sheet metal, welding rod/wire, grinder discs, bondo, etc…). Want a mobile base? Add another $70 or more if you want/need an extension table. Dust door? Motor cover? Blade guard/splitter? Throw in some new bearings, belts, paint, blade(s) and maybe some new wiring and it starts to add up quick if you are missing a lot of stuff.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Pogo930's profile

Pogo930

18 posts in 1003 days


#2 posted 08-22-2016 12:53 AM

I’d take the pics/video to a body shop and see what they would charge. A few years back an outfit was custom painting new 66s. You could have it painted bright red. Or wire brush the rust, spray it with Extend rust neutralizer and spray it with cans.
As far as a miter gauge most people seem to upgrade anyway.
1/4 ply for a dust door if you don’t have one, then watch ebay.
The fence will cost you, Grizzly has a SHopfox fence for $289.95 I bought one for my used Unisaw years ago and it is a nice fence. Equivalent to the one on my Sawstop PCS.

View RogR's profile

RogR

113 posts in 1225 days


#3 posted 08-22-2016 01:36 AM

Just me, and your pics aren’t much to go on, but I would pass. As said, it has obviously not been well taken care of so why would the faults end at the base? By the time you go through it enough to feel good about it and buy a new fence, you will be in it for several hundred more than asking.

If this saw was anything other than a PM66 you probably wouldn’t look twice.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1846 days


#4 posted 08-22-2016 01:51 AM

If the guts don’t look like that it would be in my shop.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6178 posts in 2625 days


#5 posted 08-22-2016 02:14 AM

That a shame. A T66 is arguably the finest table saw ever made and for some POS to disrespect it like that is a crime. I hope you can restore it.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1534 posts in 2090 days


#6 posted 08-22-2016 02:28 AM


That a shame. A T66 is arguably the finest table saw ever made and for some POS to disrespect it like that is a crime. I hope you can restore it.

- BurlyBob


Kinda harsh there, aren’t you bob? The saw being sold is in an estate sale. It could be the guy had a stroke while using it, or any number of health issues that prevented him from letting the saw wind up in that condition. And it’s a direct possibility today that no one in the family was interested in cleaning up the mess. To call the previous owner a POS is a bit NASTY coming from a possible nasty guy. You just don’t have enough information to conclude the owner was what you called him. ........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1280 days


#7 posted 08-22-2016 02:52 AM

MaxBishop,

Since the saw runs smoothly it is probably worth the effort, although if historically accurate restoration is your goal, I am sure the project will run into some money.

One option is to contact Powermatic. Perhaps they can furnish a new cabinet and any other parts that may be required. While they may not have a PM66 cabinet, perhaps a cabinet for one of their other saws would work. My PM66 from the late nineties has a pretty nice fence, but the mitre gauge is nothing to write home about, though I am not sure you need one. No provision was made for a riving knife on my saw, but it came with a splitter and blade guard as one assembly. A couple of years ago I contacted Powermatic concerning a riving knife, but they offered none for the PM66 at that time. Your best source for closely matching paint is from Powermatic.

Echoing Pogo930’s idea, scrape and sand away the rust and patch the holes as best you can and then paint over the repairs. It would not look very pretty, but since the corners look in pretty good shape and most of the cabinet looks ok (from what I can see), I would think the cabinet will continue to support the weight of the saw and remain a stable platform. If you want the repaired cabinet to look almost like new, perhaps a good auto body shop could make the repairs for you.

Since it appears that only the lower area of the cabinet is damage, the lower area of cabinet could be cut off. The remaining portion of the cabinet could then be fastened to a platform of your own construction. If the cabinet is taken to a welding or metal shop, they could probably make fairly straight cuts and perhaps even weld on some eye loops on the lower portion of the cabinet, making it easier to attach to a wooden base.

Another option that could be considered is to build your own cabinet with construction lumber and plywood. This low cost option could consist of a frame with four posts and rails connecting the legs to carry the weight. Some lower stretchers would add some stability. The frame could then be skinned with plywood for stability and dust collection. However some careful design work would be required. Cut outs for the bevel crank, the elevation mechanism, and for the blade guard on the outfeed side of the cabinet are needed. Leaving plenty of access to the motor would be required for maintenance, to grease bearings and replace the belt. Basically duplicating the existing cabinet using wood and using the existing cabinet to guide the design might work out.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6178 posts in 2625 days


#8 posted 08-22-2016 03:10 AM

Jerry I’ve seen a lot abuse and neglect in my life, both human and material. It doesn’t take a genius to properly care for either in the smallest degree. I call them as I see them. I’m not very politically correct and have no regrets about that. I was raised by a strong man who taught me the meaning of respect in all things. Sadly that is something seriously lacking in today’s world. Everyone has an excuse and won’t man up to their shortcomings.

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#9 posted 08-22-2016 03:48 AM

Thanks all for your replies. The first thing I want to do is acknowledge that I shouldn’t have started off addressing just the “gentlemen” of this site. I realize there are female members and I wont make that oversight again. My apologies if I offended any of the women here.

I wish I had better pics. I added a couple more. In my haste I failed to get good shots. It is sitting in an old mortar and stone basement that obviously was very wet on occasion. It appeared that it was rarely cleaned out and the sawdust and water mix would just sit against the cabinet.

MrUnix: great points. The metal work is what I’m worried about. My concern is the integrity of the cabinet and sanding and filling with bondo is only cosmetic. That and it needs everything you mentioned except the motor cover. :-( The guy agreed to $300 after I pointed out everything I need to do. But, as you point out, it adds up.

Pogo930: If I go for it that may be an option. I would prefer to do the work myself but my concern is the structural integrity of the cabinet after doing so.

RogR: You are correct. If it wasn’t a PM66 or, possibly a Unisaw I wouldn’t be struggling over it. I do believe the rest of the saw to be solid aside from whatever long term issues being in a wet environment would cause.

TheFridge: I’m close to just jumping in but my gut keeps stopping me. I’ve headed over twice only to turn around and dig some more on the net and ultimately post here. I admire your ability to just go for it! I keep telling myself I’ll never see a PM66 for this price again but its all the additional costs that has me nervous.

Thank you all for your input. I guess the question is what is considered a good deal on an ‘84 PM66? Even at $300, with approx. $300 for a fence, I’m guessing around $200 for the cabinet work and the other items I want/need I’m looking at somewhere in the neighborhood of +$1000. Add to that the only way I can get it out of this basement is in pieces as the stairs of this old house are very narrow. The initial buzz of finding it is kind of wearing off.


-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7358 posts in 2559 days


#10 posted 08-22-2016 04:24 AM

The initial buzz of finding it is kind of wearing off. I m leaning towards sticking to reconditioning my Craftsman and waiting.
- MaxBishop

If you already have a working saw and don’t have a pressing need – I would pass and wait for one that is more complete and in better condition. Don’t know where you are, but I see used PM66’s show up every now and then for well under your estimated restore cost above – in way better condition and with lots of extra goodies included. Unisaws for even less. Patience pays. To me, that PM66 is worth $100 at most, given it’s condition and lack of ‘stuff’ :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9214 posts in 1498 days


#11 posted 08-22-2016 02:44 PM

The top appears to be in fairly good shape. If the trunions and arbor are as well, I wouldn’t sweat the cabinet at all. It’s mostly cosmetic and structurally could be reinforced with plywood or some welded angle. I don’t think it’s a great deal considering the crappy fence. But I do think it’s a fair deal provided the additional costs and elbow grease required aren’t an issue.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#12 posted 08-22-2016 10:23 PM

Thanks guys. I called Powermatic today. No luck. The cabinet is obsolete. They told me to try Redmond but they didn’t answer. I’m still trying to justify the purchase but I feel like I’m just stalling until I hear from the guy that it’s gone. Must admit, you guys that would go for it give me pause for thought. I’m 49/51, go/no go.

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View RogR's profile

RogR

113 posts in 1225 days


#13 posted 08-23-2016 02:36 AM



I guess the question is what is considered a good deal on an 84 PM66? Even at $300, with approx. $300 for a fence, I m guessing around $200 for the cabinet work and the other items I want/need I m looking at somewhere in the neighborhood of +$1000.

This. You’ll be in it for a grand AND many hours of metal work before you ever make sawdust with the thing. Now, if you are a project kind of guy, who gets warm fuzzies from burnishing base metal into bright gold, then by all means go for it. But in my neck of the woods PM66s that are tip-top with extras pop up regularly in the $900-1200 bracket. Which makes all that work … free.

View unbob's profile

unbob

810 posts in 2263 days


#14 posted 08-23-2016 03:19 AM

In my area they now going for over a $1000 in fair condition, ones that are near mint 12 to 15 hundred. That one shown here could get $600!
I would buy it for $300 and use it as is…......

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#15 posted 08-26-2016 03:30 AM


I guess the question is what is considered a good deal on an 84 PM66? Even at $300, with approx. $300 for a fence, I m guessing around $200 for the cabinet work and the other items I want/need I m looking at somewhere in the neighborhood of +$1000.

This. You ll be in it for a grand AND many hours of metal work before you ever make sawdust with the thing. Now, if you are a project kind of guy, who gets warm fuzzies from burnishing base metal into bright gold, then by all means go for it. But in my neck of the woods PM66s that are tip-top with extras pop up regularly in the $900-1200 bracket. Which makes all that work … free.

- RogR

Thanks RogR. Thats what I was hoping to find. This one just came out of nowhere. I’m a handy kind of guy but the base (cabinet) of this one has me on the fence. I am not set up for metal work. I’ve had good results with bodywork but replacing metal is something I’ve not attempted.

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#16 posted 08-26-2016 03:50 AM


In my area they now going for over a $1000 in fair condition, ones that are near mint 12 to 15 hundred. That one shown here could get $600! I would buy it for $300 and use it as is…......

- unbob

Thanks unbob. That’s what I see here too. There is a 5hp 3ph listed on CL near me right now for $1599. As to your final point…I’m with ya. I just don’t know if I can go down in the basement and use the dang thing with it looking like that knowing what it could/should look like. Even so, the point is valid; its a usable PM66. To complicate things, I have to buy a fence for my Craftsman 113 for it to be satisfying to use. Same is true for the PM66. Either way I’m spending an additional $300+ before I can start having fun with it. I have no real $$ in the Craftsman so essentially I could have a $300 Craftsman or a $600 PM66. Hmmmm.

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

259 posts in 1430 days


#17 posted 08-26-2016 03:59 AM

Depends on your usage, I guess. That Craftsman is a solid saw with the right fence. Years ago, I put a Biesemeyer on mine and it did everything that I asked it to. I put hundreds of board feet through that thing and it didn’t even blink.

I get your waffling on what to do, IMO the rust on that saw isn’t horribly bad. The structure is essentially intact. If it was mine, I would pass….because I have a basement shop. But in your case if it’s off the truck and right into the shop, it’s doable.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1846 days


#18 posted 08-26-2016 05:37 PM

A body shop could cure the rust problem quickly with new metal and a little bondo.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 2432 days


#19 posted 08-26-2016 07:04 PM

I second it is worth $100. $300 with a $200 credit for getting it out of the basement!! ;) What you need to look for, IMHO, is a second pm66 with a blown motor and rusted out top with good fence, rails, and a nice cabinet, for say…. $200!!

-- Who is John Galt?

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

7081 posts in 2958 days


#20 posted 08-26-2016 07:11 PM

Seems like some value there to me. In my area, a nice used PM would be $1300-1400 easy. If you can get it all spiffed up, new fence and cutting for $700-800 and have a lifetime saw…that feels like value. You are still 50% less the cost of a new cabinet saw from Grizzly, and probably more enjoyable than your C-Man saw with a new fence too.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1325 posts in 2308 days


#21 posted 08-27-2016 06:20 PM

I just want to offer a fence. I believe I still have all the parts for the original fence from my 74 PM66. It is the long jetlock style fence. I am in south bend. Let me know if you want it

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#22 posted 08-28-2016 06:07 AM

Thanks for all the recent replies. It appears the majority would give it a go. With that and the recent developments with the Craftsman it’s enough input to sway me. Now, I just have to see if the guy is still willing to make a deal. Thank you for your feedback. In the meantime, if you have any insight into Craftsman 113 arbor issues I plan to submit a post on that topic as well. Again, thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts.

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View Tideline77's profile

Tideline77

102 posts in 1131 days


#23 posted 08-28-2016 09:16 AM

Probably was in a saltwater flood…..........just guessing …....hurricane tidal surge

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#24 posted 08-28-2016 08:57 PM



I just want to offer a fence. I believe I still have all the parts for the original fence from my 74 PM66. It is the long jetlock style fence. I am in south bend. Let me know if you want it

- Shawn Masterson

Wow! I misread this the first time. Shawn, that is a very generous offer and greatly appreciated!! I am trying to contact the owner of the saw to see if it is still available and if he is still willing to make a deal. If I am able to strike a deal I would certainly, very gratefully accept! Thanks for the offer!

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1028 posts in 1935 days


#25 posted 08-28-2016 10:53 PM

395 is apretty good price,200.00 is even better!I would guess the way the rust is the basement flooded and the saw dust held the wet for a long time. I would already have it in my shop,wire wheel will clean it up and you can get a close match on the paint.for detailed fixing post over at http://www.owwm.org/ and ask someone to post the photos for you or post a little about yourself and the problem at hand a little in each post till you get the post count to post photos.The people on there fix that kind of damage in there sleep and can guide you to a good outcome,and may have sources for new or replacement parts.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7358 posts in 2559 days


#26 posted 08-28-2016 11:47 PM

As long as there isn’t any major problems with the guts (cracked castings, missing teeth, etc…), then you should be able to use that machine as is – with a good cleaning, new fence/miter gauge, new bearings and belts and addressing minor issues and replacing any missing bits you may run across – figure on at least $400 more than what you originally pay for the machine as a minimum. It might not be pretty, but will still be a workhorse.

But – in your original post, you said ”I should probably mention I want the saw to be immaculate and true to the original when said and done.” There is a big difference between rehab and restore, in terms of costs, time and effort. For a restore, you really want to find a machine that is in as complete and in as good a shape as possible – it reduces the amount of work you need to do to it, and doesn’t wind up being a money pit trying to source missing/broken parts. If your intention is to really do a restore, that cabinet (and plinth) is a major issue and will significantly bump your final cost up. By the time you are said and done with it, you will probably have sunk as much money into it as you would finding another machine that needs much less… like this Unisaw in your area, which you could probably get for less than the asking price. It is relatively complete (w/Unifence and some extras), and would need far less work to get into shape.


(CL Ad: http://kansascity.craigslist.org/tls/5747476412.html )

Tough call :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#27 posted 08-31-2016 06:17 AM

Thanks daddywoofdawg. I admire your, and a few of the other guys’ ability to quickly asses and make a call to go for it. If my only goal was to get a working PM66, no matter what, I would be right there with you. As much as I pump myself up I find I’m still waffling.

MrUnix, you have been very helpful -in both my quandaries- and your post above puts the source of my indecision into words very well. To restore or to rehab -or- to simply own an awesome workhorse of a saw…that is the question.

I certainly do want a saw that I will never need or want to replace and, based on what I have read here and on other woodworking forums, that saw is a PM66 with a Unisaw coming in at a photo-finish next winner. Why PM66 over Unisaw? Well, I’m clearly not the expert. In fact, either of these saws will make me an over-equipped woodworking hobbyist. That said, what I have learned from researching previous posts is that a PM66 has fewer trunnion parts and it’s trunnion assembly is more substantial or robust in its manufacture/design. As a hands-on, DIY, fix it yourself kind of guy, that appeals to me.

Bottom line…I’m looking for a tool that will enable me to do something I can do for my own enjoyment, maybe enable me to make a few occasional bucks in retirement 10-15 years down the road, AND be something I can take pride in owning because of it’s built to last – made in the USA quality! Oh, and yes, I want it to look like the showroom version…aside from a little sawdust.

It’s almost comical that you posted the Unisaw from my local Cl ad. Comical only because in my desire to own a PM66 I have overlooked a small handful of Unisaws and am questioning that decision. They are definitely cheaper around here. I have been (secretly) keeping an eye on that one for a few days. I missed (passed the opportunity) on a $350 asking price of an intact, working Unisaw recently posted by a local wood shop that closed its doors. There is another one that was just posted today for $1100. Looks pretty clean/complete. I don’t know how to post the ad.

Am I being too close-minded here; do I have tunnel vision on the PM66?

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

421 posts in 2776 days


#28 posted 08-31-2016 06:40 AM

Strip, sandblast then immediately undercoat to prevent rusting then weld and paint … no worries.

if the top is good, a metal fabrication shop could cut off the bottom 6 to 12 inches of the case and weld on new steel.
it all depends on how much you want to spend and how much you need to see orriginal appearance.

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#29 posted 09-01-2016 03:55 AM

Thanks Big Yin. My concern with a metal shop is whether they could get the shape of the bottom of the cabinet or, as you mention, the cost of doing so. I feel if the cost gets driven upwards of $800-1000 I should just wait for a better base to start with. Of course, that’s 50% of the time. The other 50% I’m waffling. At this point the saw is probably gone…but the ad is still there. I should know this weekend.

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View Thesepaperwings's profile

Thesepaperwings

48 posts in 2028 days


#30 posted 09-20-2016 08:46 PM

I actually just picked this saw up, I grabbed most of his other tools that he had as well.

View Joshh's profile

Joshh

28 posts in 977 days


#31 posted 09-21-2016 04:14 AM

You got a lot of spooky cries but it is not as dramatic as heard.Cut off the rusted bottom 15cm or so and weld in some angle iron. The saw will get shorter but put it on a mobile base and you are OK. If you dont have a welder rivets or even bolrs will do.

View jordan1a's profile

jordan1a

1 post in 973 days


#32 posted 09-21-2016 04:23 AM

Good thinks….......

-- Jordan Perry

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5432 posts in 3603 days


#33 posted 09-21-2016 07:15 PM

I would pay maybe $150 at most. If you want to rebuild it to like new condition, forget it. The parts, if available will cost more than the whole thing, new. http://www.ereplacementparts.com/powermatic-10inch-table-saw-parts-c-32549_32640_202027.html

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 2432 days


#34 posted 09-21-2016 07:48 PM

Looking forward to pics as it gets put right.

-- Who is John Galt?

View John Mills's profile

John Mills

21 posts in 1038 days


#35 posted 09-21-2016 08:24 PM

If you had come to the Grizzly scratch and dent sale, you could have gotten G0960 or G0961 or the G1023 for the same price as the POS powermatic. I got my hybrid G0715P for $399 with topical rust on the table. Hold off till next June and drive down to Springfield for the next sale.

-- John M. - Iowa "If the women don't find you handsome, at least they'll find you handy"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7358 posts in 2559 days


#36 posted 09-21-2016 08:34 PM

If you had come to the Grizzly scratch and dent sale, you could have gotten G0960 or G0961 or the G1023 for the same price as the POS powermatic. I got my hybrid G0715P for $399 with topical rust on the table. Hold off till next June and drive down to Springfield for the next sale.
- John Mills

There is no comparison between the PM66 and that Griz – whole different class of machine. And with a little patience, a nice Unisaw or PM66 can be had for what that 715 cost (I paid less than half of that for my Unisaw w/Biesemeyer fence and overhead guard).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#37 posted 09-22-2016 02:55 AM



I actually just picked this saw up, I grabbed most of his other tools that he had as well.

- Thesepaperwings

Congratulations!! I feel better now knowing that thing has a home! Especially after seeing some of your project pics. Nice stuff! Clearly, you will get more use out of it than I would. I’m sure Nate is relieved too. He struck me as a really good guy. I don’t have much table saw experience but I’ve worked on machinery for 29 years. That saw seemed to me to be very solid mechanically. I bet it treats you well. Hopefully you share how you are getting along with it from time to time.

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#38 posted 09-22-2016 02:59 AM



You got a lot of spooky cries but it is not as dramatic as heard.Cut off the rusted bottom 15cm or so and weld in some angle iron. The saw will get shorter but put it on a mobile base and you are OK. If you dont have a welder rivets or even bolrs will do.

- JoséMário

Thaks JoséMário, but as in my original post, with a serious saw that, “I want the saw to be immaculate and true to the original when said and done”. I didn’t feel I could accomplish that with that base and was unable to find a source for one other than another saw.

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View MaxBishop's profile

MaxBishop

24 posts in 1021 days


#39 posted 09-22-2016 03:26 AM



If you had come to the Grizzly scratch and dent sale, you could have gotten G0960 or G0961 or the G1023 for the same price as the POS powermatic. I got my hybrid G0715P for $399 with topical rust on the table. Hold off till next June and drive down to Springfield for the next sale.

- John Mills

Thanks for your opinion John but based on reading hundreds of posts here and elsewhere my mind is set on a PM66 or a Unisaw. Personally, the older the better for me. I like good, old, made in the USA stuff and am reasonably patient (stubborn).

-- Max Bishop | KC MO

View Thesepaperwings's profile

Thesepaperwings

48 posts in 2028 days


#40 posted 11-15-2016 04:35 AM

It’s taking me way too long due to other projects but this saw looks a little diffferent now then it did when I picked it up :)

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6178 posts in 2625 days


#41 posted 11-15-2016 05:23 AM

You’ve done a wonderful job. That’s really looking great.

View Thesepaperwings's profile

Thesepaperwings

48 posts in 2028 days


#42 posted 11-15-2016 10:16 PM

It’s never going to be a perfect example of a PM66 but that works fine for me. It’s rust free and the top is clean and flat. The rust was bad in a few spots but nothing that would come close to making it too weak to hold the saw or anything you put on it. It’s been scrapped, ground, bondoed, primed, and painted:) It came with an extra arbor bearing so that got put in along with every inch of the inside torn down and cleaned. The fence is actually the original powermatic one that came with it but it’s missing the locking bar, I can use a wrench but that takes too long. I plan on upgrading the fence anyway so I still feel like it was a great deal for me. I think if I was to sell it right now I could get $700 without question.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com