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View MrRon's profile

Japanese furniture making

by MrRon
posted 08-15-2016 06:43 PM


10 replies so far

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1442 posts in 2505 days


#1 posted 08-15-2016 07:11 PM

I can’t remember where I read this but there is the story of a American woodworker watching a Japanese man build a box to hold winter sweaters. The box was built to extremely tight tolerances like you mentioned. The American kindly pointed out that the box would swell and be impossible to open in the humid summer. The Japanese man looked at him strangely and said “But why do I need a sweater in the winter?”

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 1096 days


#2 posted 08-15-2016 07:18 PM

I like that one JADobson

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View Richard's profile

Richard

1927 posts in 3084 days


#3 posted 08-15-2016 07:33 PM



I can t remember where I read this but there is the story of a American woodworker watching a Japanese man build a box to hold winter sweaters. The box was built to extremely tight tolerances like you mentioned. The American kindly pointed out that the box would swell and be impossible to open in the humid summer. The Japanese man looked at him strangely and said “But why do I need a sweater in the winter?”

- JADobson


So I wonder how he would make a box for Summer clothes ? I am really amazed at some of the joinery the Japanese use in the furniture and buildings.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1073 posts in 3211 days


#4 posted 08-15-2016 07:45 PM

I guess you’d have to make the box for summer clothes in the summer, then put it away during the winter (when the reveals would be greater).

Drawers can be pretty tight, piston-fit on the sides, as there’s very little seasonal wood movement in that direction (only over the thickness of the wood, pretty negligible). It’s different for the top of the drawer, of course. Was he using quartersawn softwood? They can be amazingly stable dimensionnally.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

671 posts in 2329 days


#5 posted 08-16-2016 12:29 AM

Several of the videos I have watched appear to be using paulowina (kiri in Japan). I have never built anything from the stuff except fishing lures.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2280 posts in 2192 days


#6 posted 08-16-2016 01:28 AM

Also would like to point out that’s some of the woods they use in Japan work very well with their tools and style of wood working.
They have been doing their thing for a long time.
Even some of their jointery is very unique for the woods they use.
Some of the woods they use we will never see.
I really don’t think it’s fair to compare our furniture design and style.

Aj

-- Aj

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5495 posts in 3637 days


#7 posted 08-16-2016 08:05 PM

The woods they use look beautiful. I wish it was available here. Even the wood they use in house construction is mostly clear with little or no knots. I understand they harvest the trees, cut them into slabs and stack them for 5 years before using it.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1169 days


#8 posted 08-16-2016 08:08 PM

yamazaki

View Tideline77's profile

Tideline77

102 posts in 1165 days


#9 posted 08-16-2016 10:54 PM

I read a little about this subject when I stumbled across a Japanese furniture maker website.( located in NYC)

My wife was visiting the. Metropolitan Museum in NY, so I went online to take a look …....and somewhere the web sucked me in and I ended up on the furniture website, Internet and George Dickel collided

One thing led to another and ended up watching a bunch of videos on Chinese and Japanese wood working.

From what I gather the time period from about 600 AD to 1200 AD ” The Golden ages of China”
Times were prosperous and fine wood works were in high demand, these techniques and styles were born in China and spread to other areas in Asia.

Most all of the furniture and buildings were built without fastners

Some of the work is extremely detailed and intricate designs, some is extremely simple but very appealing.

It was a pretty advanced trade way back then

When I retire I plan to spend some time in Asia and learn a little more about it

You can search this forum for Asian design or Asian inspired and see a few projects on here

Otherwise

I’m hungry for more information

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 2258 days


#10 posted 08-17-2016 12:54 AM

I could watch this kind of stuff all day long.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1pvUlQgYtk&ab_channel=次世代に繋ぐ伝統建築【先人の知恵を記憶する】

https://youtu.be/YQwrB_h3K_M?t=3m

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvTg2OwntgI&ab_channel=BorisPopov

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

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