LumberJocks

All Replies on Portable AC recommendation needed for garage shop

  • Advertise with us
View Big_T's profile

Portable AC recommendation needed for garage shop

by Big_T
posted 08-08-2016 02:25 AM


33 replies so far

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1976 posts in 2278 days


#1 posted 08-08-2016 02:44 AM

I’m in your situation, typing this at 9:40 p.m. and the temp in my garage right now is 99. I’ve looked into this but passed on portables because they would be a waste of money in a garage in Texas. A window AC would be best, I don’t know if you have a window, I don’t. Guy next door to me put a window AC in his window-less garage, cut a hole in the bricks, did a poor job, the bricks are falling apart.

Not sure what I’m going to do. I’ve got a giant fan going 2-3 feet behind me when I’m in there, not ideal but it’s manageable.

View BulldogLouisiana's profile

BulldogLouisiana

326 posts in 1525 days


#2 posted 08-08-2016 02:49 AM

Portable AC’s don’t do a very good job of cooling. A 10k window unit would do a much better job. If at all possible get the biggest window AC in that you can. If a window unit isn’t feasible, I’d save up for a ductless mini split. I am afraid you would just be wasting money on a 14k portable unit.

-- There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who don't.

View gtbuzz's profile

gtbuzz

427 posts in 2826 days


#3 posted 08-08-2016 02:53 AM

I think you’ve made the first important step with insulating the ceilings. You really need to be doing the garage doors too though. I’m in a similar situation. 20×20x10 attached garage, walls were all insulated but metal garage door. The ceiling is only insulated where there’s a living space above.

I live in Atlanta, and during our summers, it would hit around 95 in the garage on the hottest days. I went through the effort of adding in foam insulation to the back of the garage doors as well as R10 rigid foam insulation to the portion of the ceiling that wasn’t insulated. That made a huge difference in and of itself, and lowered temps to about 85 on the hottest days.

Recently, I added a 14k BTU (Delonghi heating / cooling unit from Costco) and that does an okay job in the garage. I know going in that it’s a losing battle because of all the air gaps around the garage door but it really does help. On the hottest of days, I can get it down to about 80F. Still not cool, but it’s made a HUGE difference in my desire to work in there. The biggest difference is that it’s significantly less humid when I do that. On cooler days, I don’t seem to have a problem hitting 75.

One thing to keep in mind is that a space like this is going to take a while to cool down. On weekdays, I turn the thing on as soon as I get home if I know I’m going to be working in there. On the weekends, I’ll start it up around 9AM and just leave it running all day. Using a Vornado to circulate the air also helped.

Last thing I could add, based on my trial and error, is definitely go for the largest unit possible. Portable units all run off of a 15A circuit, so they top out at 14k BTU. Don’t even waste your time with anything smaller, as it really won’t be very effective. If it’s possible, go for a window unit. Those things are more efficient and come in 220 flavors that would do a better job cooling down the space.

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

794 posts in 3235 days


#4 posted 08-08-2016 04:16 AM

I live in southern California, inland, away from the cooling ocean breeze. It gets really hot. A few weeks ago i installed a 1500 btu window ac unit in my two car oversized garage. It works better than I ever expected. My shop has no insulation in the walls although I did blow in about 6” of attic insulation. There are cracks you can see through around the double garage door. A few weeks ago it was 103 degrees. I got home around noon and turned on the ac. The shop was totally cooled down in 15-20 minutes. I couldn’t be happier.

-- Ken

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2837 posts in 2681 days


#5 posted 08-08-2016 12:04 PM

If that fridge is running then you are wasting a ton of energy trying to cool the heat coming off the back of it.

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#6 posted 08-08-2016 03:19 PM



If that fridge is running then you are wasting a ton of energy trying to cool the heat coming off the back of it.

- dhazelton

Yep both are running, a necessary evil since I buy in bulk at BJs/Costco. The white one is a freezer and the black one (under the wheels) is a fridge.

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#7 posted 08-08-2016 04:32 PM


I m in your situation, typing this at 9:40 p.m. and the temp in my garage right now is 99. I ve looked into this but passed on portables because they would be a waste of money in a garage in Texas. A window AC would be best, I don t know if you have a window, I don t. Guy next door to me put a window AC in his window-less garage, cut a hole in the bricks, did a poor job, the bricks are falling apart.

Not sure what I m going to do. I ve got a giant fan going 2-3 feet behind me when I m in there, not ideal but it s manageable.

- ColonelTravis

Sadly there are NO windows… That would have made this choice easier and cheaper.

So option 1 is pay a handyman to install a wall unit in the concrete wall. I have both 230 and 115v.
-18,000 btu wall ac $500-$600 with EER of 11
-Sleeve $70
-Exterior support bar $30
-Extended warranty $60
-should I get a lintel bar installed?
-what would a “qualified” handyman charge for something like this? The handyman I use said $250 but he specializes in tile work so I’ll get another estimate.
Option 1 Net investmet = $900-$1000

Option 2 is get a DIY Mr. Cool 18,000 btu mini split from HD for $1,300 with SEER of 16, includes 5 year warranty.

Option 3 is a 14000 btu portable with EER of 9 for $500-$600 with extended warranty

Option 4 is two smaller 8000 btu portables for $600-$700 with extended warranties

Any thoughts?

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1150 posts in 1945 days


#8 posted 08-08-2016 06:36 PM

One thing to remember is not to oversize the AC for the footage to be cooled. Too large a unit will short cycle on and off too much. The unit needs to be on for long periods to remove humidity. I have a 12000 btu window unit in a 20X20 garage/shop that is insulated R13 walls and R19 ceiling and it cools very well and the temps here have been in the mid to upper 90’s. I say to use anything but a portable AC unit, they are worthless.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5535 posts in 2878 days


#9 posted 08-08-2016 07:59 PM

Here’s another voice that says the portable AC’s are worthless. I used an 8000 BTU window unit in my 24×32x8 shop and it worked well until it crapped out. Thinking I wanted to upgrade, I replaced it with a Honeywell 12000 BTU portable unit. It didn’t cool the shop at all. My thinking is that while running this thing is exhausting a huge amount of air form the shop, and the make up air is at outside temperature. The window unit didn’t do that, it recirculated the interior air after cooling it, at least I think that was a big part of the difference. I gave the portable to the Habitat restore after using it one summer, and replaced it with another window unit. So put me on the list that says the portable units are worthless.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#10 posted 08-12-2016 04:18 AM



One thing to remember is not to oversize the AC for the footage to be cooled. Too large a unit will short cycle on and off too much. The unit needs to be on for long periods to remove humidity. I have a 12000 btu window unit in a 20X20 garage/shop that is insulated R13 walls and R19 ceiling and it cools very well and the temps here have been in the mid to upper 90 s. I say to use anything but a portable AC unit, they are worthless.

- WhyMe

Mine is close to yours in size so I should get the 12000 btu unit. The Mr.Cool ductless unit in that size is $1039 + tax. Does anyone know if these things go on sale?

It’s about the same price as the Jet DXPro BS I’ve been looking at… I guess it will have to wait until next year after I pay off the AC. Thanks WHY ME

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2793 days


#11 posted 08-12-2016 01:54 PM

I have been using a 220vt 12,000BTU window unit in my shop since 1997. Has run great for both heat and a/c all this time. They do take some time to heat up and cool down the shop so I have used a hot water heater timer to cycle it on an hour before I come home. When I put this in I did not have any windows so I made a hole in the back wall and installed unit. I added on in 2003 and finally got windows in the shop but left the unit where it was. Even adding on a 10×10 section to one side it still does well to keep the temp down around a workable 80F.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1150 posts in 1945 days


#12 posted 08-12-2016 02:51 PM


One thing to remember is not to oversize the AC for the footage to be cooled. Too large a unit will short cycle on and off too much. The unit needs to be on for long periods to remove humidity. I have a 12000 btu window unit in a 20X20 garage/shop that is insulated R13 walls and R19 ceiling and it cools very well and the temps here have been in the mid to upper 90 s. I say to use anything but a portable AC unit, they are worthless.

- WhyMe

Mine is close to yours in size so I should get the 12000 btu unit. The Mr.Cool ductless unit in that size is $1039 + tax. Does anyone know if these things go on sale?

It s about the same price as the Jet DXPro BS I ve been looking at… I guess it will have to wait until next year after I pay off the AC. Thanks WHY ME

- Big_T

Your shop has more ceiling insulation than mine plus the Mr Cool is probably better on cooling than a window unit. So you may be fine with a 10K BTU ductless. Check the cooling specs on the 10K ductless.

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#13 posted 08-13-2016 08:25 PM


Your shop has more ceiling insulation than mine plus the Mr Cool is probably better on cooling than a window unit. So you may be fine with a 10K BTU ductless. Check the cooling specs on the 10K ductless.

- WhyMe

They only offer 9k and 12k units. The 9k is at a big disadvantage since it does NOT have a DIY kit and the warranty is only 2 years instead of 7 years. Though the 9k is $330 cheaper, you can see why the price difference. I’m putting the order today for the 12k, thanks for steering me away from the 18k for the reasons you mentioned and I’ll save $300. :)

View clin's profile

clin

1030 posts in 1381 days


#14 posted 08-13-2016 10:36 PM

The amount of AC you need is not easily determined. It depends on a LOT of variables, where you live, insulation, widows, doors, exterior wall area, roof area, air leakage, slab insulation, wall construction, orientation of house to north, internal sources of heat, etc.

A very conservative estimate is 1-ton of AC (12,000 BTU/hr) per 600 sq-ft. This estimate almost always is an overestimate and result in too much AC. 1000 sq-ft per BTU/hr is not uncommon.

A 12,000 BTU/hr (1 ton) unit in your 380 sq-ft shop is, of course 380 sq-ft per ton and is almost certainly much too much AC. Even with the 9,000 BTU/hr unit that works out to be 506 sq-ft per ton. So even that is too much. But I’m not sure you can buy a mini-splt any smaller.

Of course there’s a big difference if you live in some place extremely hot like Yuma, AZ versus someplace very mild like coastal southern California.

Now, what is meant by too much?

Most mini-splits have variable speed compressors and can throttle themselves. So ideally they just slow down, rather than simple on at full blast, then off. It’s like a car driving on the highway versus in town. This is one reason the mini-splits are so efficient. But, they only throttle to a point, and will shut off when even the slowest they run is too much.

Ideally you want the unit sized so it runs constantly at full power on your hottest days. That will get you the most efficiency. For living spaces, this is also the most comfortable. It removes the most humidity and the air temp doesn’t cycling from getting a bit too cold before it turns off, to a bit too warm before it turns on.

Of course, you’re talking about a shop, and you aren’t looking for the same comfort level you want in your living spaces. So I understand that comfort, beyond just getting cooled, is not likely an issue for you.

Keep in mind that mini-splits are most efficient when running all the time. You typically do not set back the thermostat. Studies have shown that setting back a thermostat daily, results in a very small energy savings.

What I mean by this is the common thing people do is turn their AC off or to a higher temperature while they are at work. But what happens is the house simple absorbs more heat that must be removed later. You get a little more efficiency doing this with common AC units, but come home to a house that is warm and perhaps humid for awhile.

However, with a mini-split there is no advantage to setting your thermostat back for relatively short periods of time. So if you are going to be in your shop daily, just leave the mini-split on all the time. Of course if this also your garage and cars are being pulled in and out, that’s a whole other issue.

If you’re a weekend warrior, then it makes sense to turn it off during the week and turn it back on for the weekend.

I use my shop almost daily so I just let my unit run all the time.

I think you’ll find that a mini-split is so much more efficient than anything you are used to, that you may find it’s just easier to leave it on.

The only reason I would consider the 12,000 BTU/hr unit over the 9,000, is if you expect to allow the space to warm up when not in use and want the extra capacity to cool it faster. Else, I think 9,000 is probably more than enough. But as stated first, there are a lot of variables. Unless you run a Manual J calculation (what the pros do to calculate actual needs), you’re just guessing.

Also, if you haven’t already, insulate EVERYTHING and seal the garage door.

FYI, a $1,300 mini-split sounds very inexpensive, make sure you compare it to the big boys like Mitsubishi and Fujitsu for quality and features. I’m not saying it won’t be fine. But don’t assume all mini-splits are the same.

-- Clin

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 3615 days


#15 posted 08-13-2016 11:12 PM

I didn’t read all the replies so I guess I missed the part about insulation. The more the better. My one car garage is insulated and has a mini split AC mounted on the wall. The HOA frowns on through the wall or window AC’s so this was a good solution for me.

I had R-38 insulation blown into the ceiling. Two walls were already insulated. When we replaced the siding on our house, I had the contractor insulate the exterior wall that had been previously uninsulated. Then I replaced the metal garage door with an energy efficient insulated garage door. Even though there are still a few leaks, It is a heaven sent relief to work out there in this Houston heat. 100 outside – 77 in the garage!!!

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#16 posted 08-14-2016 04:12 AM


1. Of course there s a big difference if you live in some place extremely hot like Yuma, AZ versus someplace very mild like coastal southern California.

2. I use my shop almost daily so I just let my unit run all the time.

3. I think you ll find that a mini-split is so much more efficient than anything you are used to, that you may find it s just easier to leave it on.

4. FYI, a $1,300 mini-split sounds very inexpensive, make sure you compare it to the big boys like Mitsubishi and Fujitsu for quality and features. I m not saying it won t be fine. But don t assume all mini-splits are the same.

- clin

1. I live in Southern Florida and I suspect that the 12k btu will be 10-15% too much for 400 ft^2 but consider the following: garage is always 90+ degrees even at night, the walls are not insulated, air leaks everywhere and an non-insulated garage door. I will add styro-foam panels soon, but they only have a R-3 or R-4 value and the door torsion springs will have to be re-calibrated $$.

2. Watching TV drives me nuts so this is my new hobby to keep my brain from turning to mush. Wife does laundry runs daily in there – talk about a sauna.

3. Current 4-ton home ac is Trane 17 seer and that’s 10 years old.

4. Only considering this one since it has a 7 year warranty and is only $1,100 for 12k btu. I know Mitsubishi and Fujitsu are the grandfathers of minis, but for a play room I did not want to spend too much until I know I will truly enjoy this new hobby.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 3615 days


#17 posted 08-14-2016 06:33 PM

”...but for a play room I did not want to spend too much until I know I will truly enjoy this new hobby.”

I think you will get a lot of use out of your playroom, whether it is woodworking, reloading, or working on fishing gear.

Here are a few pics of my playroom. I love it, just wish it was three times larger! :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2212 posts in 2414 days


#18 posted 08-14-2016 06:49 PM

Managing your climate inside the shop is a uphill battle. One that can be won but with lots of research. I originally had a standard attached 2 car garage, walls & garage door not insulated, and foolishly took down the ceiling drywall to easily run electrical and all that. I put R-19 batts up between the rafters, recently re-installed the drywall. I think my next step will be blown-in insulation for side walls and then styrofoam the garage door. Already have those neat wind dams on the outside of the garage door to help knock down breezes.
I have a new 15k BTU window a/c to use that I will have to cut in the wall for (will have to research how to properly do this, no hacking allowed!) and I have my 60k BTU NG Reznor heater for winter.
On top of all this… still more shop organization (leaning towards pallet jack for moving machines around instead of mobile bases).
This stuff never ends :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5643 posts in 4047 days


#19 posted 08-14-2016 08:46 PM

Made a big mistake when I built me shop (in Wisconsin) four years ago … installed gas heat (Hot Dawg 30,000 BTU), but didn’t bother to put in A/C.

The shop is well-insulated, so it really holds the heat. The only time I can stand to work out there is early morning or late evening with the garage door open and fans running.

Shop has no windows, and I really don’t want to hack a hole in the wall for a window unit, so a ductless mini-split is probably the right answer. The problem is, the system-installed quotes I am getting from contractors run a little over $4K and I don’t want to do the install myself.

Praying for cooler weather!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View clin's profile

clin

1030 posts in 1381 days


#20 posted 08-15-2016 03:26 AM



... the walls are not insulated, air leaks everywhere and an non-insulated garage door. I will add styro-foam panels soon, but they only have a R-3 or R-4 value and the door torsion springs will have to be re-calibrated $$.

- Big_T

While I think you need to both insulate and add AC to get things cool, insulating, and sealing are always the top priority.

Even as it is, you might find that portable unit does do something useful if you get things properly insulated.

Just insulating can reduce the peak temperatures by 5 to 10 deg F. You still need to cool because some external heat still gets in AND you will generate a fair amount of heat with your body, lighting, machines (table saw shop vac, dust collection, etc.).

And yes it costs money. There’s no free ride when it comes to making a space comfortable. But by far the best bang for your buck is insulation.

I assume you have framing behind that paneling. If so, I’d see if there is some sort of blown in insulation, or just strip the walls, insulate and re-panel. If you can’t insulate the space or there is no space to insulate, then you need frame the wall and put in insulation and panel.

Yep, it costs and that’s no fun, but you need to insulate those walls.

-- Clin

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#21 posted 08-15-2016 09:32 PM


I assume you have framing behind that paneling. If so, I d see if there is some sort of blown in insulation, or just strip the walls, insulate and re-panel. If you can t insulate the space or there is no space to insulate, then you need frame the wall and put in insulation and panel.

- clin

Cost is not a problem, I just don’t like to waste money.

My house is odd, it has steel studs in the walls and the garage is CBS – but there is ONLY insulation in the ceiling and not any of the walls. Last year I added PGT 7/16” impact windows and my electric bill is still $300/mo in the summer.

Today I am ordering the ductless mini AC so that’s gonna add another $50/mo or more in electricity. It may be worth it but only time will tell if I spend at least 2-3 hours a day in there. I know my wife will love doing the laundry now, that’s for sure, so that alone may be worth it.

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#22 posted 08-15-2016 09:50 PM



Made a big mistake when I built me shop (in Wisconsin) four years ago … installed gas heat (Hot Dawg 30,000 BTU), but didn t bother to put in A/C.

This is what I am ordering in the next 15 minutes. You just need a handyman to drill a hole in the wall and make a few connections. No HVAC equipment needed. Try Angie’s List or something like it and they shouldn’t charge more than $200 for the day – that’s what I pay someone to go up in the attic because I don’t fit at 6’ and 300lbs

.http://www.homedepot.com/p/MRCOOL-DIY-12-000-BTU-1-Ton-Ductless-Mini-Split-Air-Conditioner-and-Heat-Pump-115V-60Hz-DIY-12-HP-115A/207085060

View clin's profile

clin

1030 posts in 1381 days


#23 posted 08-16-2016 04:52 AM

If money is not an big issue, INSULATE NOW. Get it done. It will make a big difference.

Also, I don’t think your electric bill will go up anywhere near $50/month. When I added mini-splits to two rooms and my shop (3 total), I couldn’t see any increase. Now, two if these replaced some of the AC from the house. They were areas not well covered, too far away to cool properly. So I was offsetting some conventional AC. But the shop is all new area (300 sq ft) and I keep it cool all the time in New Mexico. Not as humid as you, but probably a bit hotter.

Anyway, mini-splits tend to work very well. I think you will be pleasantly surprised how well it may work. Though like I said before, I don’t know how that brand or unit compares to the well respected Mitsubishi, Fujitsu and others. If it works similarly, you’ll be happy with it.

FYI: I don’t know how you can install it properly without have to vacuum the lines. Typically the unit itself has refrigerant in it, but after you attache the lines, you still have to purge the lines of air before releasing the refrigerant from the unit. This process also checks the line for leaks. But maybe they have some way the lines are already evacuated and you don’t have to do this. If so, that’s way cool because that’s the only part of this that isn’t DIY for someone with some experience in properly penetrating their wall or roof.

Good luck and be sure to update this thread after the install.

And did I say INSULATE !

-- Clin

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 2495 days


#24 posted 08-16-2016 07:04 PM

A few things I haven’t seen mentioned:

- Mini-splits don’t just cool, they also heat and dehumidify. This is great when you just need a pop of heat in the AM, or are only using one room in a centrally heated building, even if zoned. I work alone from home, I can warm up only my office, and my wife can prepare for work in a toasty bedroom using very little energy.
- The dehumidify function can work for you even when you’re not in the shop.
- When we installed Mitsubishi mini-splits in my entire home, our electric bill went DOWN when comparing months we used window a/c, even though we run them far more often and keep the house much cooler. They’re extremely efficient.
- The better mini’s are nearly inaudible. No endless grind of noise or rattling, inside or out. Better installers will either hang the exterior units on solid concrete foundation walls or sit them on an isolated support. This is a big deal for wood frame buildings compared to wall or window units. Our variable-speed external unit is under our deck, and we can’t hear it when sitting on the deck. This is huge compared to most external compressors I’ve seen, that grunt when they start and rattle as they run.
- Maintenance is super easy, just rinse out a filter from the indoor unit, and pop it back in.
- Components are interchangable. In cases where one area gets thrashed continually, only that wall unit may need repair or replacement down the road. You’re not running a large system to condition one room.
- No lost windows or large holes to cut in structures. No seasonal swaps or holes to plug in winter.

Can you tell I’m thrilled? I also got to keep my hydronic heating, which I greatly prefer over forced air. If I were building a brand new home, I’d again go with mini-split cooling and hydronic baseboard heat.

View Nickkwins's profile

Nickkwins

27 posts in 1035 days


#25 posted 08-17-2016 03:05 AM

I have a detached 2 car garage that is insulated. The windows don’t open so I opted for a portable a/c rather than framing a window shaker through the wall. In hindsight I wish I had framed a window unit in the wall.

The major disadvantage I discovered is that the portable A/C cools the condenser coils by venting air from inside the garage through the wall. This creates negative pressure inside the garage and hot air from around the garage gets sucked in through every crack and crevice, fast enough that the 12k BTU unit simply can’t compete with the hot air it’s drawing in. With the money already spent and the holes already cut I’m not going to change it, but if I had it to do over again I’d frame in the window shaker because the ones I’ve seen cool the condenser coils with outside air.

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#26 posted 08-20-2016 06:11 AM

Good luck and be sure to update this thread after the install.

And did I say INSULATE !

- clin

Clin I picked it up this afternoon at local HD. Took over an hour for them to locate since they accidentally put someone else’s name on it. Receiving also separated the 2 pieces in different holding areas and that added to the confusion. Right now it’s in the back of my SUV and staying there overnight cuz the Laguna 1412 BS is coming in 7 hours of this writing and I need the room (aka “I have not finished organizing all my stuff yet”).

So what should I do about the CBS walls that have paneling and zero insulation?
Firring strips, drywall, and which R value insulation?

Thanks

View clin's profile

clin

1030 posts in 1381 days


#27 posted 08-20-2016 07:31 AM

I’m not a construction expert, so keep that in mind. While there are ways to insulate block walls with insulated panel products, you need walls that can support the weight of shelves and cabinets. So I’d be inclined to just frame it with 2×4’s.

If you lay them flat, then you have a 1 1/2” space you can fill with foam board. Extruded foam board has an R-value of 5 per in. So that would give you an added R-value of 7.5. Since your block is perhaps an R-value of 2, that’s gets you to 9.5. Much better than what you have, but not really what you would want. Also, if you keep the paneling in place, which I assume is glued to the block, that has some R-value too.

But foam board is relatively expensive. If you frame it with 3 1/2” space, then you can add common R-13 fiberglass batts. Only down side to this is you lose a bit more room size.

Other options are spray foam which I believe is very higher performance.

A big advantage to framing this out is you can add electrical wiring etc in the new wall. As always, do that to code. But you can never have enough wall sockets. And might be a good chance to pull some 240 V circuits.

As for the walls, when I did my garage shop recently, it already had sheet-rock walls (with the exception of the dividing wall I put in). So I left that, but covered with French cleats. I’ve seen many suggest plywood walls because then you can screw into them anywhere without regard to hitting framing. At least for normal loads, perhaps not a lumber rack.

By the way, I’m not sure what the typical techniques are for dealing with vapor barriers and such are in Florida. You clearly have humidity, but I don’t know if you get cold enough, often enough for condensation to be an issue. In any case, you’ll want to look into that to make sure you don’t create a moisture problem.

-- Clin

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#28 posted 08-20-2016 01:22 PM


1. Only down side to this is you lose a bit more room size.

2. Other options are spray foam which I believe is very higher performance.

- clin

Space is tight since my small SUV will sleep in there, so I will look into spray foam. Is the foam ugly and foaming like “Great Stuff” ? If so it will probably still need 2×4 plus drywall.

Thanks

BS was just delivered (thought it might be in a crate) so I will need to address insulation this weekend.

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#29 posted 08-20-2016 01:37 PM

I was just thinking – are you talking about the styro-foam garage insulation or something else?

View clin's profile

clin

1030 posts in 1381 days


#30 posted 08-20-2016 06:16 PM



I was just thinking – are you talking about the styro-foam garage insulation or something else?

- Big_T

I’m talking about common rigid, extruded foam board. Like pink or blue stuff you find at many home centers. For the spray stuff, I’m, talking about professionally applied spray. It’s way beyond some DIY in a can thing. I’ve not seen it done, but in other, recent discussions on LJ concerning shop insulation, others have brought this up and speak very highly of it. I think it may be the best possible R-value for a given thickness.

So it is probably the best option for minimizing the added wall thickness. I know nothing of how it is worked with. It’s hard for me to image how it can be sprayed on evenly enough to allow for wall board to be added later. Maybe in that case they fill the cavity after you put up wall board or whatever you cover the walls with.

-- Clin

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5643 posts in 4047 days


#31 posted 08-20-2016 07:27 PM

Maybe in that case they fill the cavity after you put up wall board or whatever you cover the walls with.

That’s exactly what they do … fill the cavity, let it cure for awhile, then trim it flush with the framing with what looks like a big bread knife.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Big_T's profile

Big_T

119 posts in 1742 days


#32 posted 08-20-2016 07:38 PM



I m talking about common rigid, extruded foam board. Like pink or blue stuff you find at many home centers. For the spray stuff, I m, talking about professionally applied spray.

It s hard for me to image how it can be sprayed on evenly enough to allow for wall board to be added later. Maybe in that case they fill the cavity after you put up wall board or whatever you cover the walls with.

- clin

I checked GJ forum and many have posted it costs about $2000 (treatment only – drywall extra) for a single car garage and others paid up to $4500 for a 20×30 garage.

I will stick with your first idea to lay the 2×4s flat against the wall. If I can’t find skinny pink stuff I’ll just blow it in. I can frame one day and rent the machine the 2nd day. Though I may get a handyman to get up in the attic and do all the walls while I am renting the machine.

Looks like a fun little project..

View steiner's profile

steiner

284 posts in 3735 days


#33 posted 04-25-2017 03:44 PM

Hi Big_T,

I’m looking to install some sort of AC, and wondered how your Mr. Cool AC unit has been working for you. I’m in the Houston area, so I need AC pronto! Thanks for any insight you have.

-- Scott

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com