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View DBordello's profile

Repairing hole drilled through face

by DBordello
posted 08-06-2016 11:41 PM


24 replies so far

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#1 posted 08-06-2016 11:49 PM

To respond to my post, I have two issues:

1) The burn marks
2) The opening.

Upon further inspection, the hole was too deep anyways (doh!). Therefore, if I can seal the opening, it is okay if I block the opening there.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3204 posts in 3920 days


#2 posted 08-06-2016 11:55 PM

Not to make light of your problem, but I was greatly relieved to find that you were not seeking medical advice on a woodworking web site. I was prepared to write, “Get to the ER!”.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#3 posted 08-07-2016 12:07 AM

Fair point :)

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DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#4 posted 08-07-2016 12:32 AM

The best idea I have so far, is to cut out the damaged material, and (attempt) glue in a replacement block?

Thoughts?

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1846 days


#5 posted 08-07-2016 12:55 AM

Cut 2” off the end …

M

-- Madmark - [email protected] Wiretreefarm.com

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1313 days


#6 posted 08-07-2016 01:13 AM

DBordello,

There are probably several repair options, though I am not sure any option will completely erase the record of the mistake from the work piece. But my first thought is to find a dowel ideally of the same material as the work piece. If necessary, sweeten the hole so that the dowel will be a nice fit and glue in place. Chisel, plane, scrape, and/or sand the protruding ends of the dowel flush. After the repair, re-drill the hole. While the repair may blend well with the surrounding wood, unfortunately it will probably remain visible, but hopefully only to you.

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#7 posted 08-07-2016 01:18 AM

JBrow,

Not a bad idea. I happened to have a 3/8” plug cutter chucked in the drill press. However, the hole is 13/32”. That being said, a good idea, and not a bad result:

I am going to guess a 13/32” walnut dowel doesn’t exist (or plug cutter). Excellent idea, I think I am going to glue this in place and try sanding it down.

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1846 days


#8 posted 08-07-2016 01:27 AM

Kreg plug?

M

-- Madmark - [email protected] Wiretreefarm.com

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#9 posted 08-07-2016 01:29 AM



Kreg plug?

M

- MadMark

What diameter are those?

I am currently scouring the internet for a 13/32” plug cutter. OR, wondering if I should enlarge it to 7/16”, since those are more common.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1313 days


#10 posted 08-07-2016 01:48 AM

DBordello,

The hole looks fairly long and I suspect that after the repair the hole will be re-drilled in the same place. If that is the case, I would think better results would be achieved by purchasing a ½” walnut dowel. A ½” drill bit should follow the existing hole fairly well, so after the defective hole is re-drilled at ½”, the ½” dowel could be glued in place. Doing the repair in this manner would make re-drilling the new hole a little easier and there would be full support around the new properly drilled hole for whatever will go into that hole. I suggest ½” dowel since a 7/16” walnut could be hard to find, but these folks may carry 7/16” walnut dowels.

http://woodproducts.caldowel.com/Dowel-Rods.aspx

My concern with a plug cutter is that the repair would only be at the surface, since the plug will be of limited length. But if you only need a surface repair and the required hole can be drilled in another location, the plug probably would be fine.

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#11 posted 08-07-2016 01:50 AM



DBordello,

The hole looks fairly long and I suspect that after the repair the hole will be re-drilled in the same place. If that is the case, I would think better results would be achieved by purchasing a ½” walnut dowel. A ½” drill bit should follow the existing hole fairly well, so after the defective hole is re-drilled at ½”, the ½” dowel could be glued in place. Doing the repair in this manner would make re-drilling the new hole a little easier and there would be full support around the new properly drilled hole for whatever will go into that hole. I suggest ½” dowel since a 7/16” walnut could be hard to find, but these folks may carry 7/16” walnut dowels.

http://woodproducts.caldowel.com/Dowel-Rods.aspx

My concern with a plug cutter is that the repair would only be at the surface, since the plug will be of limited length. But if you only need a surface repair and the required hole can be drilled in another location, the plug probably would be fine.

- JBrow

Thanks for the suggestion. It appears I drilled the hole longer than it needed to be. Therefore, if I can repair the breached area with a plug, redrilling will not be necessary.

At this point, I am thinking about ordering a 13/32” plug cutter.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1292 days


#12 posted 08-07-2016 01:54 AM

Maybe a design change. Cut off 2” off each end and add an end piece.

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#13 posted 08-07-2016 02:28 AM

I kind of like this…

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

646 posts in 1142 days


#14 posted 08-07-2016 03:02 AM

I’d use my inlay gear to make a patch.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6106 posts in 1106 days


#15 posted 08-07-2016 03:19 AM



Maybe a design change. Cut off 2” off each end and add an end piece.

- jbay

DITTO

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2280 posts in 2191 days


#16 posted 08-07-2016 04:10 AM

I would make a 13/32 dowel.Just drill a 13/32 hole in a piece of steel and hammer some wood thru it .If the wood splits before you get one long enough.Rive the wood first.Another word for splitting along the grain.

Aj

-- Aj

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3191 days


#17 posted 08-07-2016 04:59 AM

You could make a wide, shallow recess the length of the piece and inlay a thin strip. It would be much less visible than a dowel or other patch and would require no change in design. It would just look like two boards edge glued.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View splatman's profile

splatman

586 posts in 1792 days


#18 posted 08-07-2016 05:39 AM

With a plug cutter, cut enough plugs that, when stacked, will fully fill the hole. Align the plugs’ grain with the workpiece’s grain. Sand/plane everything flush after the glue dries. This way, there’s no cross grain looking like a knot or causing problems through the seasons. If it still looks ugly, I +1 Shipwright’s suggestion.

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 1620 days


#19 posted 08-07-2016 02:49 PM



You could make a wide, shallow recess the length of the piece and inlay a thin strip. It would be much less visible than a dowel or other patch and would require no change in design. It would just look like two boards edge glued.

- shipwright

What would be the best way to achieve this? Router?

View Robert's profile

Robert

3403 posts in 1874 days


#20 posted 08-07-2016 03:04 PM

I try to turn these things into design curiosities.

My thinking is make a diagonals inlay, maybe in a contrasting wood.

Make a matching on on the other end.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3191 days


#21 posted 08-07-2016 08:16 PM


You could make a wide, shallow recess the length of the piece and inlay a thin strip. It would be much less visible than a dowel or other patch and would require no change in design. It would just look like two boards edge glued.

- shipwright

What would be the best way to achieve this? Router?

- DBordello


Dado stack on a table saw or router, yes.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

794 posts in 3243 days


#22 posted 08-07-2016 11:05 PM

I don’t believe you can repair the face hole to be invisible. Consider adding an inlay feature A signature disk or a different kind of wood in a bow tie or something. When I have a problem I can’t fix I try thinking about how to convert it from a problem to a feature

-- Ken

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

3923 posts in 2371 days


#23 posted 08-08-2016 12:25 AM

I like the inlay idea Offsetting colors of wood would look nice! Like my slogan says ”We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says “I meant to do that”.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

559 posts in 3351 days


#24 posted 08-08-2016 01:14 AM

+1 for the patch. My screw-ups usually become bowtie or diamond Dutchmen. And if those shapes are too intimidating then make the patch a circle that can be accommodated by the meeting point of your circle cutter and forstner bits.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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