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View jayseedub's profile

Is My "BLO" D-R-Y?

by jayseedub
posted 08-05-2016 12:11 AM


9 replies so far

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 965 days


#1 posted 08-05-2016 01:09 AM

I would get some Naphtha, dries faster then Mineral Sperits and a bit more aggressive, wet a rag with it, and wipe of the excess BLO let it dry a day or 2 and see if it still feels oily/tacky, then when not do your Shellac, It may take 2 wipes over time.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2161 posts in 2293 days


#2 posted 08-05-2016 01:33 AM

I agree with the above. Next time don’t bother with blo if using shellac – it will pop the grain as well or better than blo. I use shellac under wb finish for that reason all the time. If using ob poly for the finish, no need for blo either. Read this and try it.

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 965 days


#3 posted 08-05-2016 01:43 AM

I have used BLO to pop the grain, but I cut it with about 1/3rd to 1/2 Mineral Spirits, same effect, and dries faster. I disagrees about Shellac popping the grain, I use it over the BLO, for some reason pops it, JMHO and experience. Pr MinWax Natural stain pops it too and drys fast, that is where I got the idea of cutting the BLO with MS. Old BLO will dry real slow too.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12658 posts in 2683 days


#4 posted 08-05-2016 05:25 PM

Shellac doesn’t care whether the oil is dry. Turners mix them together and apply. French polishing uses oil as lubricant. Apply your shellac and don’t worry about it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5389 posts in 2796 days


#5 posted 08-05-2016 05:46 PM

Jeff Jewitt has a finish he calls the Q&D french polish (quick and dirty). to apply it, he first uses a coat of slightly diluted BLO, wipes it off quickly, and then applies shellac. I think you’re good to go.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1079 days


#6 posted 08-05-2016 06:46 PM

I don’t see why you’d use a water-based poly over shellac over BLO. Water-based makes sense if you want to avoid yellowing/darkening that occurs with oils, but you used BLO already, so that is moot.

Might as well just use normal oil-based poly. That makes the shellac in between coat pretty much moot as well. (no oil-based/water-based clash).

Put it right on top of your existing “damp” BLO coat, no need to wait. And be done.

View jayseedub's profile

jayseedub

139 posts in 2268 days


#7 posted 08-05-2016 09:12 PM

Thanks to you all for your input and insight.

gargey—my choice of water based was really on the recommendation of a mentor—nothing more than that. Other than ease of cleanup, I’m not really passionate either way on oil-based vs. water-based.

At the risk of inciting some passions :-) —what are the arguments against water-based finishes that oil-based trumps?

Thanks again to you all—it’s a great feeling to know that there’s a group of experienced, passionate folks so willing to share insight, experience and opinion with me.


I don t see why you d use a water-based poly over shellac over BLO. Water-based makes sense if you want to avoid yellowing/darkening that occurs with oils, but you used BLO already, so that is moot.

Might as well just use normal oil-based poly. That makes the shellac in between coat pretty much moot as well. (no oil-based/water-based clash).

Put it right on top of your existing “damp” BLO coat, no need to wait. And be done.

- gargey

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5389 posts in 2796 days


#8 posted 08-05-2016 09:39 PM

The water borne versus oil based discussion sometimes bring on strong emotions. I’m a big fan of oil based finishes, I see them as being more durable over time and in some cases better looking. A little over 2 years ago, Bob Flexner wrote an article where he described his belief that the oil based finishes were more durable (generally speaking) than their water borne counterpart. That said, there are some realities to face: water borne finishes are getting better every day, and the good one are just that: very good. Oil based finishes have some downsides, slow drying being a big one. But they are also getting harder to buy. With the “green” laws being passed (mostly aimed at professional users) the hobbyists market is drying up. My stat is not one of the most aggressive on banning the oil based finishes, yet they are mostly gone from common channels. In the aggressive green states they are impossible to find. Waterborne finishes still have a few things they haven’t solved: it must be a lot warmer for them to cure out, a real problem in areas that actually have a winter. Even so, there comes a day when that’s all we will have. A big problem I have with them is the labeling: calling them “poly” (which is meaningless in itself) or “lacquer” is just marketing BS. With very few exceptions, they are predominantly acrylic finishes, to call them anything else is just capitalizing on the lack of labeling standards.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2161 posts in 2293 days


#9 posted 08-05-2016 09:52 PM

Here’s my reasoning on using various finishes:

Larger projects get sprayed. OB poly overspray doesn’t dry before landing, and turns everything to sandpaper. It also takes a long time to dry. Precat lacquer is great, except I don’t want to blow up myself and the shop in the winter (when I’m doing most projects), so I started using WB poly or lacquer (Target Coatings). I don’t have to worry about high concentrations in a closed up shop in the winter. To deal with the lifeless look of WB finishes, I use Target’s WR4000 stain base, a WB oil emulsion, tone with shellac, then topcoat. Also, I can put several coats of WB on in a short time to build a thick film thickness if desired. Can’t do that with OB poly, it would take forever to dry much less cure. Precat lacquer is the choice if you have good ventilation.

For smaller projects and a lot of turnings, I just use MW OB poly prepped for wipe on. The previous link to my blog explains why. Fully filled gloss turnings are finished with WB as above.

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