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View ADHDan's profile

Best way to execute an edge miter joint for plywood carcase?

by ADHDan
posted 07-28-2016 07:25 PM


39 replies so far

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1170 days


#1 posted 07-28-2016 07:38 PM

Don’t just use glue for plywood miter joints. Your last choice is best of those listed because the biscuits.

Fine Woodworking or some other wood magazine last month had an article about joining plywood miters with splines and/or with aluminum angles attached to wood that fit into mortises on each piece of plywood.

Much more work to build it, but it wont suck the way a plywood miter would with just glue.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2280 posts in 2193 days


#2 posted 07-28-2016 07:42 PM

That’s some nice looking pieces your thinking about making.
All the methods you mentioned sound iffy to me.Im not that great with a router maybe your better.
I am very good with a skill saw and a straight edged when it comes to sheet goods.
So if I had to have a miter joint that’s what I’d do.
How about a butt joint and you cover the end grain with oak?
Miter joints are kinda ugly if they aren’t tight.

Aj

-- Aj

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1401 posts in 3244 days


#3 posted 07-28-2016 07:45 PM

Definite thumbs down for the locking miter bit, I bought 1 and there is also quite a bit of jigging required for the vertical cut, I used it for box columns which worked but it hasn’t been used since.

If I HAD TO have the mitered corner I’d go with a good blade and a good sled and cut them at the TS (remember to score your line with knife first for the tearout. .

But, since you’ll be working with ply anyway, you’re going to need some sort of edge treatment, I’d also consider putting solid stock around my edges and then joining the corners without the mitre, which won’t be a big design loss because the face frame would hide that front edge… 5” tall … kids room…. even if your mitre wasn’t perfect it wouldn’t be as noticeable at that height and

Nope I say go for the mitre, check your tune up, and maybe run some test cuts first, and sneak up on the final cut,

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Mk3supraholic's profile

Mk3supraholic

7 posts in 1062 days


#4 posted 07-28-2016 07:50 PM

If the cost for the router bits are truly a disadvantage, why wouldn’t you just buy a cheaper bit?

If you only have a few of these cuts to do i would just do it on the table saw.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#5 posted 07-28-2016 08:15 PM


Don t just use glue for plywood miter joints. Your last choice is best of those listed because the biscuits.

Fine Woodworking or some other wood magazine last month had an article about joining plywood miters with splines and/or with aluminum angles attached to wood that fit into mortises on each piece of plywood.

Much more work to build it, but it wont suck the way a plywood miter would with just glue.

- gargey

Wasn’t planning on just using glue unless I did a lock miter, which I’m leaning against. Assuming I go with a simple chamfer and some kind of reinforcement, I’m wondering whether it would be better to use a parallel spline, perpendicular spline, or biscuits.

I.e.:

(a)

vs.

(b)

Follow up questions:

(1) Easiest way to cut a 45 degree bevel on the one-foot edge a 5’x1’ plywood board: table saw, router table with chamfer bit, or circular saw?

(2) For strengthening the miter joint, would it be easier to use biscuits, a parallel spline (a), or a series of perpendicular splines (b)?

(3) Easiest way to cut a parallel spline slot (image a) in the edges of large plywood boards – table saw blade tilted 45 degrees, running the board over it flipped end-for-end (to cut opposite the edge miter)? Series of biscuit joiner cuts, with the joiner fence set to 45 degrees? Something else?

I’ll be using an 80-tooth full-kerf Freud plywood cutting blade, and I’ll score/tape the cut line – so I’m not TOO concerned about tearout (plus any tearout should hit only the inside of the case, which would be easier to hide).

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1315 days


#6 posted 07-28-2016 08:37 PM

ADHDan,

If you can keep the plywood running true through the entire table saw cut, this would be my approach. In addition to the router based disadvantages you mentioned, I would be concerned about chip out.

If my geometry is correct and there is space in the shop, the bevels could be cut as Complementary Angles by cutting the carcase top on one side of the blade with the good face up and the carcase side on the opposite side of the blade with the good face down. In this way if one bevel is 44.9 degrees, the other bevel would be 45.1 degrees allowing a 90 degree corner to be formed. A sharp plywood cutting blade and firmly adhered masking tape on the both faces and both sides of the cut line could help control table saw tear out.

If the Complementary Angles are as close to 45 degrees as possible, shallow mating grooves could be cut into the joining bevels at the table saw and a parallel spline used for alignment and to reinforce the joint. Perpendicular splines add plenty of strength but do little to help with alignment in the glue-up. Great care would be required to flush up perpendicular splines since the sides and top are plywood.

Even with biscuits or the splines, a glue-up that results in perfectly aligned tight fitting joints all along the joint line would be the biggest challenge for me. But with planning, some dry runs, and glue with a long open time, a good joint could result. I would also consider using band clamps, but I could end up using bar clamps.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#7 posted 07-28-2016 08:58 PM



ADHDan,

If my geometry is correct and there is space in the shop, the bevels could be cut as Complementary Angles by cutting the carcase top on one side of the blade with the good face up and the carcase side on the opposite side of the blade with the good face down. In this way if one bevel is 44.9 degrees, the other bevel would be 45.1 degrees allowing a 90 degree corner to be formed. A sharp plywood cutting blade and firmly adhered masking tape on the both faces and both sides of the cut line could help control table saw tear out.

If the Complementary Angles are as close to 45 degrees as possible, shallow mating grooves could be cut into the joining bevels at the table saw and a parallel spline used for alignment and to reinforce the joint. Perpendicular splines add plenty of strength but do little to help with alignment in the glue-up. Great care would be required to flush up perpendicular splines since the sides and top are plywood.

Even with biscuits or the splines, a glue-up that results in perfectly aligned tight fitting joints all along the joint line would be the biggest challenge for me. But with planning, some dry runs, and glue with a long open time, a good joint could result. I would also consider using band clamps, but I could end up using bar clamps.

- JBrow

This is all 100% in line with my thinking. Since I have a decent sized cabinet saw with extension wing, I think I have good-enough support to use your opposite-cut strategy for the sides versus top/bottom pieces. I’ll just have to wheel the saw into the center of my 11’x17’ shop :-).

My biggest concern is keeping the board flat, straight, and square while crosscutting an edge miter on a 5’ by 1’ board. I have a dead-on accurate Incra miter gauge with an extendable fence, but I’m thinking it might be better to build a custom sled for this project, for three reasons: extended support under and behind the workpiece, a zero-clearance backer to minimize tearout, and the sled gives me something to clamp the board to so it doesn’t slide during the cut.

That last point seems key to me – if these boards shift at all during the edge miter cut, the joints are probably toast.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#8 posted 07-28-2016 09:16 PM

I’m building a dresser right now that’s exactly the same idea. (Rift Cut Oak Ply)
Top is 82” long x 20 deep. Sides are 30” long x 20” deep.

Edit: Changed my mind.
I’m going to use my left tilt table saw, cut the two sides face up with the fence set at 30 3/4”
Then I’m going to cut the long top, face down with a fresh blade, on the other side of the fence using a sacrifice fence and bottom board for it to ride on. I’ll post pics when I do it.
Tape the joints, glue, fold. Should be plenty strong enough.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#9 posted 07-28-2016 09:34 PM


I m going to use my left tile table saw, cut the two sides face up with the fence set at 30 3/4”
Then I m going to cut the long top, face down with a fresh blade, on the other side of the fence using a sacrifice fence and bottom board for it to ride on. I ll post pics when I do it.
Tape the joints, glue, fold. Should be plenty strong enough.

- jbay

I kind of liked your initial idea for a sacrificial fence. I have a left-tilt saw with more tabletop on the right side of the blade than the left side. Would it be a terrible idea for me to use a sacrificial fence on the left side of the blade and use that as a constant perfect reference for my crosscuts? Obviously, you typically never use both the fence and miter gauge at the same time, but for my setup the only “trapped offcut” danger is a 12” triangular strip sandwiched between the blade and the sacrificial fence.

That does seem like a very good way to ensure I’m making the exact same cuts with the exact same measurements for each piece, and I can do it with my miter gauge extrusion rather than building a new sled.

Is there a hidden danger I’m missing, besides the possibility of a thin strip kickback (which wouldn’t be anywhere near my body)?

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#10 posted 07-28-2016 09:52 PM

This is how I’m going to do the long ends. Face will be down, I will leave about 1/64” from the point so that it won’t splinter/chip the face. The off cut will be above the blade, it might flutter a little bit but it won’t get trapped and shoot out like a missile. (also blade won’t be as high as pictured)

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2299 posts in 3339 days


#11 posted 07-29-2016 12:37 AM

I just did some counters that measured 36” tall by 60” long by 34” deep. I made them from the $30.00/sheet smooth pine plywood the big box sells. I mitered the corners using my cabinet saw and, when necessary, a simple jig I made for the purpose, since my saw is limited to four foot cuts.

Once I had the cuts, I used the biscuit joiner to tie the beasts together.

Here is a page with information on the jig: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/166210

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1315 days


#12 posted 07-29-2016 03:23 AM

ADHDan, jbay

You are probably ahead of me but I will comment again anyway. Sometimes plywood can have a cup across its width. I would think the plywood needs to be kept flat across its width throughout the mitre cut for a well-fitting joint. If the top and sides are rough cut extra wide, a flattening caul can be screwed to the outer edges of the plywood top and sides. This flattening caul (perhaps a 1” x 2” or 1” x 3” piece of wood) screwed in place toward the rough cut edges of the plywood could help keep the plywood flat. If needed, several cauls could be used. Since the flattening caul is screwed in place within the sacrificial zones at the outer edges of the plywood top and sides, the holes left by the screws would be cut away when the sides and top are ripped to final width. If the crown of the cup is down, then the extra wide plywood could be screwed to a sled or a pair of cauls (or runners) of the same thickness that would rest on the table saw table.

The second advantage to making the mitre cuts on wider rough cut plywood is that the mitre cut can be a stopped cut, leaving the off cut attached to the plywood work piece. A riving knife or slitter could help keep the still attached off cut from getting trapped and/or torn from the work piece. The uncut area would then be cut off when the top and sides are ripped to final width.

There is an option for cutting the mitre that would leave plenty of room for the off cut to just fall away without becoming trapped while using the table saw fence. This option is the use on an L fence (an overhead fence) and a rub strip attached to the work piece parallel to the mitre cut line. While I have yet to find an application for this technique, I have kept it in mind for when it may come in handy.

The L fence consists of two pieces of wood attached to each other at 90 degrees. One leg of the L is clamped to the fence. The second leg of the L extends over and covers the blade. This second leg of the L fence must have long edges that are parallel to each other and hence parallel to the table saw fence.

A rub strip screwed to the extra wide plywood top and sides in the sacrificial zone would ride against the leg of the L fence that extends over the blade. If the leg of the L fence is wide enough, sufficient room is left between blade and table saw fence preventing the off cut from becoming trapped. If for some reason the offcut decides to come rocketing out, the second leg of the L fence over the blade will keep the off cut from lifting off the table. The key to a good mitre cut is an L fence that is accurately made and the rub strip attached to the plywood top and sides exactly 90 degrees to the edges of the plywood and thus parallel to the mitre cut.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#13 posted 07-29-2016 01:07 PM



This is how I m going to do the long ends. Face will be down, I will leave about 1/64” from the point so that it won t splinter/chip the face. The off cut will be above the blade, it might flutter a little bit but it won t get trapped and shoot out like a missile. (also blade won t be as high as pictured)

- jbay

Wish I could do that, but with my table saw and shop setup I think I’m going to have to end up with a trapped piece. I just don’t have adequate table support to the left of the blade for a long piece of wood. At least the offcut will be far away from my body, and my hands won’t be anywhere near the blade.

My panels are long, but only about 11” wide – so I should be able to support them adequately with my extruded miter gauge.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#14 posted 07-29-2016 01:13 PM



ADHDan, jbay

You are probably ahead of me but I will comment again anyway. Sometimes plywood can have a cup across its width. I would think the plywood needs to be kept flat across its width throughout the mitre cut for a well-fitting joint. If the top and sides are rough cut extra wide, a flattening caul can be screwed to the outer edges of the plywood top and sides. This flattening caul (perhaps a 1” x 2” or 1” x 3” piece of wood) screwed in place toward the rough cut edges of the plywood could help keep the plywood flat. If needed, several cauls could be used. Since the flattening caul is screwed in place within the sacrificial zones at the outer edges of the plywood top and sides, the holes left by the screws would be cut away when the sides and top are ripped to final width. If the crown of the cup is down, then the extra wide plywood could be screwed to a sled or a pair of cauls (or runners) of the same thickness that would rest on the table saw table.

The second advantage to making the mitre cuts on wider rough cut plywood is that the mitre cut can be a stopped cut, leaving the off cut attached to the plywood work piece. A riving knife or slitter could help keep the still attached off cut from getting trapped and/or torn from the work piece. The uncut area would then be cut off when the top and sides are ripped to final width.

There is an option for cutting the mitre that would leave plenty of room for the off cut to just fall away without becoming trapped while using the table saw fence. This option is the use on an L fence (an overhead fence) and a rub strip attached to the work piece parallel to the mitre cut line. While I have yet to find an application for this technique, I have kept it in mind for when it may come in handy.

The L fence consists of two pieces of wood attached to each other at 90 degrees. One leg of the L is clamped to the fence. The second leg of the L extends over and covers the blade. This second leg of the L fence must have long edges that are parallel to each other and hence parallel to the table saw fence.

A rub strip screwed to the extra wide plywood top and sides in the sacrificial zone would ride against the leg of the L fence that extends over the blade. If the leg of the L fence is wide enough, sufficient room is left between blade and table saw fence preventing the off cut from becoming trapped. If for some reason the offcut decides to come rocketing out, the second leg of the L fence over the blade will keep the off cut from lifting off the table. The key to a good mitre cut is an L fence that is accurately made and the rub strip attached to the plywood top and sides exactly 90 degrees to the edges of the plywood and thus parallel to the mitre cut.

- JBrow

The first part of your post makes sense, but my pieces are already cut to width.

The second part makes sense too. Although for my purposes, I’m thinking it might be even easier just to clamp a 3/4” plywood fence on the front half of the fence – right up to the blade. That will give me a reference for my cuts right up to the blade, but after that there will be a gap between fence and blade – meaning, no trapped offcut.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#15 posted 07-29-2016 01:15 PM

By the way, this has been one of the most helpful threads I’ve ever posted on LJ. Lots of great brainstorming and ideas going on here, and I really appreciate it!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#16 posted 07-29-2016 02:55 PM

Cut and taped ready for glue.
Just waiting for my helper to get here to help turn it over so that I can apply the glue and fold.

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

336 posts in 2213 days


#17 posted 07-29-2016 03:15 PM

Can a 90° V shape be cut through the back of the plywood up to the veneer. Fold the pieces so over…
Would the veneer break as its folded?

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#18 posted 07-29-2016 03:44 PM

Glued and Folded

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#19 posted 07-29-2016 04:25 PM



Can a 90° V shape be cut through the back of the plywood up to the veneer. Fold the pieces so over…
Would the veneer break as its folded?

- Gentile

Hmmm, I don’t know – but I do like the idea a lot. Seems like a job for a big v-groove bit.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View dday's profile

dday

172 posts in 1824 days


#20 posted 07-29-2016 04:43 PM



ADHDan,

If you can keep the plywood running true through the entire table saw cut, this would be my approach. In addition to the router based disadvantages you mentioned, I would be concerned about chip out.

If my geometry is correct and there is space in the shop, the bevels could be cut as Complementary Angles by cutting the carcase top on one side of the blade with the good face up and the carcase side on the opposite side of the blade with the good face down. In this way if one bevel is 44.9 degrees, the other bevel would be 45.1 degrees allowing a 90 degree corner to be formed. A sharp plywood cutting blade and firmly adhered masking tape on the both faces and both sides of the cut line could help control table saw tear out.

If the Complementary Angles are as close to 45 degrees as possible, shallow mating grooves could be cut into the joining bevels at the table saw and a parallel spline used for alignment and to reinforce the joint. Perpendicular splines add plenty of strength but do little to help with alignment in the glue-up. Great care would be required to flush up perpendicular splines since the sides and top are plywood.

Even with biscuits or the splines, a glue-up that results in perfectly aligned tight fitting joints all along the joint line would be the biggest challenge for me. But with planning, some dry runs, and glue with a long open time, a good joint could result. I would also consider using band clamps, but I could end up using bar clamps.

- JBrow

This is the method that I use for all miter cuts. Make them complimentary and they always match up.
And blue tape on the cut line will save you a LOT of aggravation.

Good luck.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#21 posted 07-29-2016 04:50 PM


This is the method that I use for all miter cuts. Make them complimentary and they always match up.
And blue tape on the cut line will save you a LOT of aggravation.

Good luck.

- dday

Yeah, I definitely see the wisdom there. If I cut the 5’ lengths on the right side of the blade and the 3’ lengths on the left side of the blade, I might be able to swing this approach.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#22 posted 07-29-2016 04:51 PM

Any tips or tricks for keeping the plywood running true all the way through the cut? I’d like to do this with my Incra 1000SE, rather than build a new sled.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8652 posts in 2972 days


#23 posted 07-29-2016 05:34 PM



Any tips or tricks for keeping the plywood running true all the way through the cut? I d like to do this with my Incra 1000SE, rather than build a new sled.

- ADHDan

I like using Bessey hold downs:

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#24 posted 07-29-2016 06:09 PM

Finished joint. Sanded with a small radius. Came out pretty good, not perfect, but the unit will be painted black so it’s not critical.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2280 posts in 2193 days


#25 posted 07-29-2016 07:37 PM

Oh that came out good!

Aj

-- Aj

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#26 posted 07-29-2016 09:43 PM

That looks great.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View JIMMIEM's profile

JIMMIEM

43 posts in 1236 days


#27 posted 07-29-2016 11:44 PM

No opinion on the lock miter set. 45 degree miter chamfer bit can be tricky if it has a bearing. I did some of these on a sliding compound miter saw…..worked like a charm. You didn’t mention if you have one. Also instead of biscuits I just reinforced the corners with triangle blocks glued and pin nailed.
If these will have face frames why not put on a wood corner bead type of treatment?
Or how about applying a solid edge to the plywood?

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1315 days


#28 posted 07-30-2016 01:41 AM

ADHDan,

I think you can probably use your Incra mitre gauge with good results. I can envision two concerns. The first is the plywood edge resting against the mitre gauge fence shifting off the mitre gauge fence, rotating the workpiece and spoiling the cut. Since the length of the cut is 12” I would think that holding the work piece against the mitre gauge would not be too difficult.

The second concern is a bit more problematic. Midway into the cut the work piece could shift either into or away from the saw blade, even with the work piece firmly held against the mitre gauge. Some insurance against this eventuality could be to attach 100 grit or 120 grit sand paper to an auxiliary fence affixed to the mitre gauge.

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JIMMIEM

43 posts in 1236 days


#29 posted 07-30-2016 12:00 PM

With a Sliding Compound Miter this would be very easy. If you don’t have one this would a good reason to pick one up. Have you got a friend who owns one? This would solve the problems where the wood has to move through the blade, over a router table, or via a hand held tool.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3405 posts in 1875 days


#30 posted 07-30-2016 02:30 PM

I would not use a router tear out is a big issue.

I would scribe lines and cut on TS good side up. Make test cuts to assure accuracy. I would use a panel sled NOT. the fence.

Splines or biscuits

Epoxy glue. Be sure to tape off anywhere you don’t want glue!

Good luck!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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jayseedub

139 posts in 2360 days


#31 posted 07-30-2016 02:55 PM

I wish I’d asked this very question myself about two months ago—lessons learned, below!

I was doing the same thing with walnut plywood, and I just cut the miters (very carefully set up my blade to a true 45 degree) on a quickly made panel sled—and they worked out great. Only two things got in my way—one (mentioned above, here) was the warp of the plywood on assembly. Just a small warp across the length of the miter caused me a lot of sweating and cursing during glueup.

It caused a small small gap, and on my second piece I decided to use a black magic marker to darken the light colored interior plys, so that if there was another gap, at least it would be dark, and sort of match the walnut coloration, and therefore be less visible. There was a very small gap on the second piece, and probably only I notice it, now.

The second issue was that I sanded through the walnut ply at the edge. Rookie mistake (though I’m not really a rookie at this mistake—I’ve done it at least two other times…..).

I taped the heck out of the edges so that I didn’t get any glue squeeze-out, and I used small biscuits to reinforce the joints.

If I was going to do the project again, I might just make butt-joints, glue/pin them with nails, then veneer it, with mitered faceframes of hardwood edge banding to achieve the same look with less of the drama!

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#32 posted 07-30-2016 05:40 PM

Show you what I’m making.
I built a melamine cabinet. The Oak (shown above) will be the exterior.
I’m going to veneer the face and the doors and drawers will be inset.


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MrRon

5496 posts in 3638 days


#33 posted 07-30-2016 10:13 PM

I avoid miter joints like the plague. It is a weak joint and there is zero tolerance for error. But if you must use a miter joint, make sure your saw is perfectly adjusted, the fence is perfectly aligned, your plywood is better than the typical “big box” plywood. Then make sample miter joints. All this take a lot of time, but if you take your time, your effort will be rewarded. I would also use a splined miter joint and epoxy cement. For a blade, I would use a fine crosscut blade or at the very least, a Forrest woodworker II. Tape on the surface will help prevent splintering and tearout. Basically this is a very precision joint, best accomplished on industrial grade machinery. Doing it with consumer grade tools can be challenging at best.
I can still remember the first time I made some large boxes, around 60 years ago; I use a radial arm saw to cut the miters. It was a disaster. The joints wouldn’t close tight. Ever since, I avoid using them.

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#34 posted 08-02-2016 02:38 AM

Did you start yours yet Dan?
I got my inset doors and drawer fronts done and am ready to veneer the face of the cabinet tomorrow..
Drawers are cut and will assemble also tomorrow. (Salice brand) Soft close undermount guides.

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JBrow

1368 posts in 1315 days


#35 posted 08-02-2016 02:52 AM

jbay,

Looks good!

I have not tried the masking tape, glue, and fold method for gluing mitres. You mentioned that the mitre was not perfect after the glue-up (by the way, it looked pretty good in the photo). Was the imperfection a problem with the tape and fold method? If it is a good method I would like to use it for gluing my next mitres. Any comments or tips on this method would be appreciated.

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#36 posted 08-02-2016 03:30 AM

Thanks JBrow,

The imperfections came from making the bevel cuts on the long pc. I wiggled a little coming off the blade on one end. So I hit it with a sanding block and oversanded the joint a little bit.

No problem with the tape and fold method. My opinion is that method works great. I use 3 layers of masking tape over the joint before folding. the more tape the tighter it clamps the joint, but to many layers will pull the tape off.
The trick is good cuts, and butting the points of the bevels together nice and straight before putting the tape on.
I’ve taped up many, many miters using this method and I don’t see any reason to do it any other way.
Worked especially good on these long seams.

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JBrow

1368 posts in 1315 days


#37 posted 08-02-2016 02:51 PM

jbay,

Thanks. This will be the next way I glue together a mitre joint. I really like its simplicity.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 2503 days


#38 posted 08-03-2016 06:34 PM


Did you start yours yet Dan?
I got my inset doors and drawer fronts done and am ready to veneer the face of the cabinet tomorrow..
Drawers are cut and will assemble also tomorrow. (Salice brand) Soft close undermount guides.

- jbay

For all the help everyone provided, I’m ashamed to admit I ended up deciding against mitered corners on this project. The bookcases are for my kids’ room (2yo and 4yo) and therefore are very likely to get beat up a bit. This meant (a) I wanted something stronger than miters, and (b) I didn’t want to put a ton of effort into something that might end up being used as a jungle gym. So, I opted for glued-and-screwed rabbet joints with caps. I might miter the face frame, but haven’t really decided on that yet.

Nonetheless, all of the info everyone provided has been super helpful for general reference and I’m sure will come in handy on a future project!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#39 posted 08-04-2016 01:39 AM

No reason to be ashamed, it’s the journey to learning…maybe next time!
I got my face veneered, and got everything painted today.
I’m having a little problem with the lacquer blushing because of the unusually high humidity we are having, but with 2 coats of black primmer and 2 coats of pre cat clear over that it looks pretty good
(for being black paint that is)
One more coat early in the morning and it should be ready to mount the doors and drawers.
Pics of the face, but none of it painted.

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