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How to place 650lb table saw on mobile base?

by noone
posted 07-25-2016 04:25 PM


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55 replies

55 replies so far

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JayT

6207 posts in 2600 days


#1 posted 07-25-2016 04:36 PM

Twelve pack of beer and a few strong backs. Not necessarily in that order :-)

You might be surprised at how having others to equal out the load helps. Three of us put a ~550lb Shop Fox cabinet saw on a mobile base very easily and none of us are very big guys. Three or four decently strong guys should be able to do it.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3399 posts in 1870 days


#2 posted 07-25-2016 04:40 PM

Floor jack and 2×4’s under wings. Worked fine for me.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#3 posted 07-25-2016 04:44 PM



Floor jack and 2×4 s under wings. Worked fine for me.

- rwe2156

Can you elaborate?

View Mikenln's profile

Mikenln

13 posts in 1161 days


#4 posted 07-25-2016 04:47 PM

My experience has been that it is easier to tilt a heavy saw than you might think.
Lift up one side of the saw either by just lifting or by using a lever. A lever might be a two by four with one end trimmed down to fit under the edge of the saw.
Put several blocks of wood under the saw.
Raise the other side.
More blocks.
Put in blocks at intermediate positions. These should be slightly shorter than the gap so that they just slide in.
Raise one side or end. Remove the closest blocks. Lower back on remaining blocks.
Slide mobile base part way in (until it reaches the next blocks)
Raise the side or end again. Put original end or side blocks back in.
Remove the intermediate blocks.
Slide the mobile base almost all the way in.
Put the intermediate blocks back in.
Tilt the other side or end up. Remove its blocks. Lower back onto the intermediate blocks.
Slide the mobile base into its final position. Attach to saw.
Tilt sides up as necessary to remove all blocks.
Lower saw down again.

View SenecaWoodArt's profile

SenecaWoodArt

445 posts in 2008 days


#5 posted 07-25-2016 05:13 PM

Just a one man job for a country boy. Just bring the tractor around, place a few straps around the body and lift with the front end loader. It least that’s how I did mine. :) There are several good ideas here. The floor jack makes sense and also the lever system described above. It’s really not that difficult if you just think it through.

-- Bob

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MikeUT

190 posts in 1748 days


#6 posted 07-25-2016 05:20 PM

I’m not very good at asking for help so I tinkered until I figured out a way to put my old-school Unisaw on a mobile base by myself. It was a lot like Mikenln’s description. It was pretty tricky to slide wood under to prop one side up and then the other, and at one point I almost dropped the saw on my foot but I managed to set it up without injury to limbs or saws. If I would have had one person come and help me it would have been very easy and a lot less precarious.

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unbob

810 posts in 2292 days


#7 posted 07-25-2016 05:21 PM



My experience has been that it is easier to tilt a heavy saw than you might think.
Lift up one side of the saw either by just lifting or by using a lever. A lever might be a two by four with one end trimmed down to fit under the edge of the saw.
Put several blocks of wood under the saw.
Raise the other side.
More blocks.
Put in blocks at intermediate positions. These should be slightly shorter than the gap so that they just slide in.
Raise one side or end. Remove the closest blocks. Lower back on remaining blocks.
Slide mobile base part way in (until it reaches the next blocks)
Raise the side or end again. Put original end or side blocks back in.
Remove the intermediate blocks.
Slide the mobile base almost all the way in.
Put the intermediate blocks back in.
Tilt the other side or end up. Remove its blocks. Lower back onto the intermediate blocks.
Slide the mobile base into its final position. Attach to saw.
Tilt sides up as necessary to remove all blocks.
Lower saw down again.

- Mikenln

This method worked good for me to remove a Jet base from under a 950lb Delta 12-14”, then place it under a Jet 18” band saw. I have gathered a collection of pry bars, sometimes old tire irons work well.

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

5545 posts in 2882 days


#8 posted 07-25-2016 05:56 PM

I used an engine hoist (borrow or rent, or even buy a cheap one….they are really handy) and the tractor recently to move mine form the old place to the new. Loaded it with the hoist, and unloaded with the tractor. You do need some load slings (nylon straps with loops at each end) to wrap around the table near the cabinet of the saw. Piece of cake. PS, I paid $120 for my hoist from one of those traveling tool circus setups…really cheap 2 ton Taiwanese thing that is perfect for the occasional job.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2384 days


#9 posted 07-25-2016 06:05 PM

If you get the sawstop, it comes on its back. You get 4 guys to help you tip it up in to the base. Not sure how other saws come.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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ADHDan

800 posts in 2497 days


#10 posted 07-25-2016 06:35 PM

Lift with your back, not with your legs.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#11 posted 07-25-2016 06:42 PM


If you get the sawstop, it comes on its back. You get 4 guys to help you tip it up in to the base. Not sure how other saws come.

- bbasiaga

Edit – The ICS comes in a crate strapped upright to a pallet.

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Fred Hargis

5545 posts in 2882 days


#12 posted 07-25-2016 06:46 PM

Mine didn’t (November of 2014). It was upright on a pallet, and well encased in a 1/4” plywood box. All the other stuff was in smaller corrugated boxes firmly (I mean really firmly) stretched wrapped to the saw packaging.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#13 posted 07-25-2016 06:48 PM


I used an engine hoist (borrow or rent, or even buy a cheap one….they are really handy) and the tractor recently to move mine form the old place to the new. Loaded it with the hoist, and unloaded with the tractor. You do need some load slings (nylon straps with loops at each end) to wrap around the table near the cabinet of the saw. Piece of cake. PS, I paid $120 for my hoist from one of those traveling tool circus setups…really cheap 2 ton Taiwanese thing that is perfect for the occasional job.
- Fred Hargis

Where do you attach the hoist to? I have a finished ceiling.

Am I over thinking this?

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3263 posts in 3064 days


#14 posted 07-25-2016 07:07 PM

build a tripod with 3 landscape timbers. Tie them at the top with chain. Tie the bottom with 2×4 and lag screws. With this built over the saw you can use a cheap come-along and pick up a lot of weight. Should be pretty easy and not too expensive.

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Fred Hargis

5545 posts in 2882 days


#15 posted 07-25-2016 07:33 PM

Sorry, I’ve always called them an engine hoist, but a lot of folks call them a “cherry picker” (don’t know how you would pick cherries with one) or maybe more correctly a “folding shop crane”. You can rent them quite reasonably.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4557 posts in 4131 days


#16 posted 07-25-2016 08:10 PM

lift one side – - slide the base under, then scoot it to center.

Did that with my Unisaw. Easiest to do Before the 52 inch rail and table are on, but still not difficult. I did it solo.

Same way I took my 15 inch planar off the double stack pallet it came on.(537 pounds)

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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Kelly

2288 posts in 3333 days


#17 posted 07-25-2016 08:28 PM

I’m somewhere over sixty-five and broken goods. In spite of that, I’ve loaded my Powermatic band saw, sander, Unisaw, eight inch Grizzly spiral and so on by myself several times. I use the method Mikenln mentions.

On a three hundred pound saw it’s no big deal. Only a little more of a deal dealing with the extra two hundred fifty pounds. Said another way, that’s why hand trucks allow us to do things we couldn’t normally.

I just loaded and unloaded a four hundred fifty pound 36”x34”x96” cabinet off a cart and on to a dolly doing these things. I did grunt a little, but with an extra hand (and the wheels locked) it would have been pretty easy.

As it was, once the item was on the dolly, I had to move it left and right, a little, to get it over to the other end of the base / dolly.

View Richard's profile

Richard

1927 posts in 3079 days


#18 posted 07-25-2016 08:29 PM


I used an engine hoist (borrow or rent, or even buy a cheap one….they are really handy) and the tractor recently to move mine form the old place to the new. Loaded it with the hoist, and unloaded with the tractor. You do need some load slings (nylon straps with loops at each end) to wrap around the table near the cabinet of the saw. Piece of cake. PS, I paid $120 for my hoist from one of those traveling tool circus setups…really cheap 2 ton Taiwanese thing that is perfect for the occasional job.
- Fred Hargis

Where do you attach the hoist to? I have a finished ceiling.

Am I over thinking this?

- noone

With the Engine Hoist or Shop Crane the hoist is part of the unit. This one is $179 at HF or you can rent them for a day at most Tool Rental places and get the lifting straps at the same places.
Even with the Hoist I would find an extra person to help just in case.

View clin's profile

clin

1030 posts in 1385 days


#19 posted 07-25-2016 08:32 PM

Another vote for get getting 3 other guys to help. No sense risking damaging the saw or yourself.

-- Clin

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#20 posted 07-25-2016 08:40 PM

Clin – That would certainly be the easiest, but i’m going to have a hard time hearding up 3 guys at once to help me!

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MikesProjects

172 posts in 2291 days


#21 posted 07-25-2016 08:51 PM

I’ve done this many times. Get TWO 42’ 2×4’s than cut FOUR 4”x6” 4”- 6” long whatever height you need to clear the mobile base, lower is better …..Screw one 4×6 to each end of the 2×4 to elevate the 2×4 up the desired height, the 2×4 will remain flat, position the 4×6” legs so the width is wider than the 2×4, like a ” T ” shape, this gives the stand rigidity so it is less likely to tip over….. add a few extra screws & use silver screws so they wont snap. The goal is to elevate the 2×4, yes a 2×4 is strong enough if it doesn’t have a large knot in the middle, I’ve never had a problem, just did this last week. Basically your making 2 stands. Now that the 2 stands are made, 40” – 48” wide (wide enough for the mobile base to slide under unobstructed) 5-8” tall now you need a helper. Tilt the left side of the saw up and have someone slide a newly made stand under one side – lower the saw on the stand, it will be at an angle, continue holding the saw as it may want to tip, you may be able to lower the side with the extension to get the left side up, now lift the other side, the side with the extension wing, its a little heavy but you can do it, I lifted it holding the heavy duty t-square fence angle iron, I have never bent a biesemeyer style fence before fyi….... now have someone slide the other stand under the cabinet saw. Now the saw is up on the stand. Now slide the mobile base under the cabinet saw through the stands you just made & position it under the cabinet saw. Now reverse the last steps, lift up the side of the saw with the extension wing, have the helper carefully slide out the newly made stand. Then have the helper help position the stand while you lower one side of the saw onto the base. After its on one side go to the other side, lift the saw off the remaining stand , helper pull it out & gently lower the saw completely on the stand, you may need to work it onto the stand to get it perfectly centered. I recorded this to make a video but haven’t edited it yet, no pics but I did this to raise my saw 2”recently, 34” is just too low… As a side note I suggest cutting the 4×6 material to the minimal height, go 1.5” higher than the stand, that 1.5” should accommodate any sagging the 2×4’s will endure while the saw is elevated on the stands. You can also use 4×4’s for the legs and add some 2x material to the ends to widen the base so its less likely to want to tip…

Its really easy to do & the entire process takes 2 minutes, the stands take 5 minutes to whip out. Way easier than a cherry picker, been there-done that…... If you have a wife, friend or child 12 years or older I’d do this…...Hope this helps & makes since

EDIT: ok, I went out & snapped a few images for you to get a better look, here are my stands…

also I think my saw weighs more than 650 lbs? Its a tight fit on the ics stand, as you can probibly see I didnt scratch the saw but the possibility was there due to the ics stand is a tight fit. The ics base has the jack on one corner, I just lifted it up higher as my helper wife moved the stand into position. If you teeter-totter it on the stands its really not that heavy, just got to put your back into it, work smarter not harder. If you have 2 helpers all the better, someone can always hold the side with the estension wing, that side is always heavier & the saw could tip in that direction if you’re not careful, but fwiw this way is fairly simple….... Good luck, Mike

-- -Mike, Southern California, YouTube User ( Give & Take )

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Richard

1927 posts in 3079 days


#22 posted 07-25-2016 08:52 PM


Clin – That would certainly be the easiest, but i m going to have a hard time hearding up 3 guys at once to help me!

- noone


Using the portable Engine Hoist your Wife or Girlfriend or even a Big Kid could help to guide it into place as it is doing all the heavy work for you. The extra person can also Call 911 for you when you drop it on your foot. :)
Plus the engine hoist can fold up and be put away to wait for use on the next heavy lift project.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 1091 days


#23 posted 07-25-2016 09:04 PM

an offer of free beer works for me

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2384 days


#24 posted 07-25-2016 09:04 PM


If you get the sawstop, it comes on its back. You get 4 guys to help you tip it up in to the base. Not sure how other saws come.

- bbasiaga

.

Edit – The ICS comes in a crate strapped upright to a pallet.

- noone

Ok, I stand corrected. I got the ICS base for my PCS, and the instructions said to do as I described. I assumed that meant the ICS came the same way

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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Ocelot

2234 posts in 3027 days


#25 posted 07-25-2016 09:53 PM

I picked up an engine hoist for $50 from CL within 2 miles of my office.

View B_Woodworks's profile

B_Woodworks

14 posts in 1071 days


#26 posted 07-25-2016 09:57 PM



My experience has been that it is easier to tilt a heavy saw than you might think.
Lift up one side of the saw either by just lifting or by using a lever. A lever might be a two by four with one end trimmed down to fit under the edge of the saw.
Put several blocks of wood under the saw.
Raise the other side.
More blocks.
Put in blocks at intermediate positions. These should be slightly shorter than the gap so that they just slide in.
Raise one side or end. Remove the closest blocks. Lower back on remaining blocks.
Slide mobile base part way in (until it reaches the next blocks)
Raise the side or end again. Put original end or side blocks back in.
Remove the intermediate blocks.
Slide the mobile base almost all the way in.
Put the intermediate blocks back in.
Tilt the other side or end up. Remove its blocks. Lower back onto the intermediate blocks.
Slide the mobile base into its final position. Attach to saw.
Tilt sides up as necessary to remove all blocks.
Lower saw down again.

- Mikenln

Yes, agree. I have done something similar for multiple tools. Just one side at a time, no need to hoist the whole thing in the air.

-- A. Baker - Bloomington, IL "Just a woodworking squirrel trying to get a nut."

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Ocelot

2234 posts in 3027 days


#27 posted 07-25-2016 09:59 PM

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#28 posted 07-25-2016 10:09 PM

Thanks everyone. Loads of good ideas here. Keep them coming!

Mike – I like your idea, but in my case, since I don’t have a 4×6, I would double up a couple of 2×4’s to make the 5” thick feet for each support.

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#29 posted 07-25-2016 10:33 PM

Crap- I just thought of a fatal flaw in most of these ideas- the saw comes attached to a pallet so how does one get it off without a hoist? I wouldn’t think it would slide easily. Now I’m back to 4 guys or a hoist.

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MrUnix

7387 posts in 2588 days


#30 posted 07-25-2016 10:49 PM

Cribbing and a hydraulic jack… it can be used to lift a house. A table saw is easy peasy.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Gentile

336 posts in 2207 days


#31 posted 07-25-2016 11:55 PM

This is how I got my planer (PM100) on to a mobile base.
DO NOT USE A HANDIMAN JACK! I tried…

I don’t know how the table saw top is fastened to the base. You may want to remove that first. It would be a drag if the base dropped off…

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

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Harry

80 posts in 1569 days


#32 posted 07-26-2016 12:01 AM

+1 on the engine hoist, comes in handy for many things. Just moved a 1200 lb. kiln in our studio by myself.

-- Harry - Professional amateur

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MikesProjects

172 posts in 2291 days


#33 posted 07-26-2016 12:52 AM


This is how I got my planer (PM100) on to a mobile base.
DO NOT USE A HANDIMAN JACK! I tried…

I don t know how the table saw top is fastened to the base. You may want to remove that first. It would be a drag if the base dropped off…

- Gentile

haha, good idea!

-- -Mike, Southern California, YouTube User ( Give & Take )

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muleskinner

932 posts in 2825 days


#34 posted 07-26-2016 04:32 AM



This is how I got my planer (PM100) on to a mobile base.
DO NOT USE A HANDIMAN JACK! I tried…

I don t know how the table saw top is fastened to the base. You may want to remove that first. It would be a drag if the base dropped off…

- Gentile

“Give me a place to stand and a long enough lever and I can move the world.”

-- Visualize whirled peas

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splatman

586 posts in 1788 days


#35 posted 07-26-2016 05:23 AM

I read your comment, then your sig line, then I think “Visualize stirred peas”.

Back on topic:
If the base dropped off, then there are bigger problems.

Cribbing and hydraulic jack: Just how I’d do it, especially if a friend and me cannot do it.

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#36 posted 07-26-2016 11:59 AM

Forgive me, but can someone elaborate what “cribbing and a hydraulic jack” describes? Are you saying just shimmy it off the edge of the pallet and start jacking it however you can to get it off the pallet?

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Gentile

336 posts in 2207 days


#37 posted 07-26-2016 03:14 PM

Cribbing- the use of timbers to support something heavy

Hydraulic floor Jack a movable device to lift heavy objects, i.e. a car

Bottle Jack, hydraulic. What’s nice about hydraulic jacks is that they can be easily adjusted up and down…

Another type of cribbing…

A bottle of Jack…

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

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Richard

1927 posts in 3079 days


#38 posted 07-26-2016 05:20 PM

You just might need this by the time you get it all setup.

A bottle of Jack…

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#39 posted 07-26-2016 07:22 PM

Nice. LOL. I’m thinking I’ll be able to figure it out once it’s in front of me and I can touch it and see how moveable it is. The 650lb number scares me, but I’m hoping that me and my neighbor can slide it around enough to get it on blocks so we can slide the mobile base in. I’m a planner. I’m just running ahead and putting my over analyzed thoughts out on the interwebs.

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Jray8

1 post in 1058 days


#40 posted 07-26-2016 08:30 PM

I lifted a car engine with ratchet straps. Put a couple eyes in the ceiling joists and use straps. Even the small ratchet straps will work.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

501 posts in 1514 days


#41 posted 07-26-2016 08:44 PM

Get a supply of 3/4 material and 2×4’s…then simply tip and rock as you add more as you work around the machine.

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Shawn Masterson

1325 posts in 2337 days


#42 posted 07-29-2016 11:13 PM

I tipped my pm66 one way and had the kids throw some blocks under it then tipped it the other way and had them block the other side. from there I gently slid it onto the base. it was pretty easy considering the entire top is cast. just to note I have a cherry picker but was to lazy to go get it from the shed

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runswithscissors

3043 posts in 2414 days


#43 posted 07-30-2016 07:38 AM

Watch the U-tube video “Man moves huge blocks by himself.”

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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mlipps

122 posts in 1503 days


#44 posted 08-03-2016 09:12 PM

I have an ics. Engine lift/foldable shop crane is how I did it. Easy as pie. Bought it, used it, returned it. Harbor freight is great.

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helluvawreck

32086 posts in 3255 days


#45 posted 08-04-2016 07:05 PM

I’ve done it with a similar heavy machine. I simply used a crowbar as a lever and 12 to 16 3/4 inch blocks of wood. You take turns on the side to jack up and end up with it on 4 stacks of blocks, one in each corner. A good block size would be 3×3 x 3/4. At some point 2 stacks can be slid in toward the center. It’s better to have two people but there’s hardly any work to it and it’s relatively safe. Slide the base into the two blocks in center.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

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jimmy J

229 posts in 2768 days


#46 posted 08-04-2016 07:22 PM

way over engineering going on here. just tilt it to one side and put the mobile base under the side that was raised. then brace the base so it doesn’t move and and lift up the other side of the saw. then slide it over.

also, you don’t have to put all of the saw table on until after its on its base, and the table is the heavy part.

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#47 posted 08-05-2016 02:37 AM

The ICS comes on a pallet with one wing already installed. Is it really going to be easy to slide the saw off the pallet and on to the mobile base? I should probably be asking these questions after the saw is in front of me, but every time someone replies to this thread it gets me overthinking again!

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Fred Hargis

5545 posts in 2882 days


#48 posted 08-05-2016 11:53 AM

I couldn’t slide mine on the pallet at all….that’s why I lifted it straight up with an engine hoist. I suspect that if you work hard enough at it, you can move it on the pallet.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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HorizontalMike

7788 posts in 3303 days


#49 posted 08-05-2016 01:11 PM



The ICS comes on a pallet with one wing already installed. Is it really going to be easy to slide the saw off the pallet and on to the mobile base? I should probably be asking these questions after the saw is in front of me, but every time someone replies to this thread it gets me overthinking again!
- noone

Take off both wings and remove them from the saw/pallet. That will save you a lot of weight. the saw should slide easily after that.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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noone

585 posts in 2661 days


#50 posted 08-05-2016 11:30 PM

The ICS weighs 650 with 2 wings. I’d imagine taking those off let’s off about 100 lbs. I’m 175 and I’m thinking I can’t move 550lbs by myself. But I guess I’ll try once I get it in a month.

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