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BOAT BUILDING PLANS BY "Stevenson Projects"---let me know what you think...great site...

by Napaman
posted 11-05-2009 05:57 AM


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133 replies

133 replies so far

View degoose's profile

degoose

7257 posts in 3859 days


#1 posted 11-05-2009 06:03 AM

JUST DO IT!!! Life is too short.

-- Don't drink and use power tools @ lasercreationsbylarry.com.au

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#2 posted 11-05-2009 06:27 AM

lol…thanks…but do you know the company?? I agree…I am just checking with my 10,000 strong army of woodworkers to see if any know about these plans/boats?>?

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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Straightpiped

89 posts in 3996 days


#3 posted 11-05-2009 01:45 PM

Another website is…

http://www.bateau.com/

-- T. Nelson

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Woodwrecker

4232 posts in 4080 days


#4 posted 11-05-2009 03:05 PM

WHY NOT !!!

Every guy in the Bay Area should have something to put on the water!

Good luck & hope it turns out JUST the way you want it.

Take a few pictures along the way.

WAY, Way COOL PROJECT !!!

View lew's profile

lew

12859 posts in 4260 days


#5 posted 11-05-2009 05:13 PM

Alright, Matt!!

What a neat project and learning experience!

Just don’t build it in the basement and have to cut it in half to get it out ;^)

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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rtb

1101 posts in 4217 days


#6 posted 11-05-2009 05:24 PM

Matt, a couple of questions.

1. Can you swim ?
2. How long can you tread water? in present condition?, after 2 year diet and exercise program ?
3.where does the motor go ?
4. Have you had your head examined ?
5. How much fishing tackle does it hold ? (you are going to take Grant aren’t you)

-- RTB. stray animals are just looking for love

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#7 posted 11-05-2009 05:27 PM

It figures that DaveR has built one. He probably drew it in Sketchup first ;)

Seriously, I’ve been thinking about this project a lot. My girlfriend even wants one now, and we have a nice fiberglass 21 footer. I would build the Vacationer. The way it’s built is actually a whole lot easier than more classic methods like what mattd is doing with his awesome tender project. Of course, he’s also getting that classic boatbuilding experience too.

The things I like about this design is that it’s been modified to be very easy to build, it looks like a miniature Ted Brewer ketch (without the mizzen) with that clipper bow, and it doesn’t look like your standard plywood, hard chined Glen-L boat. This is a boat you can be very proud of and put a lot of your own details into. Some people have carved decorative trailboards to give it that Errol Flynn clipper look. If you couple all this with the fact that it will be great for the kids, I think it’s a no-brainer. If we didn’t already have two boats, and weren’t saving for our 40+ footer, I’d be building at least one of these. I may have to build one of the models to get this out of my system.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 4804 days


#8 posted 11-05-2009 08:50 PM

You’ve seen this sailboat Matt, but you might as well see it again.

This is a great boat for a beginner.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#9 posted 11-05-2009 10:38 PM

Thanks everyone at work right now so cant comment…but thanks!!! Will ask more questions later…

Matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#10 posted 11-06-2009 04:03 AM

THANKS EVERYONE I was at work so i could type too long…DAVE R….I SAW THAT BOAT on the website a few days ago and looked at the pictures over and over not knowing it was you…

I had been getting ideas and feedback from scully since I know he sails and found out that he manages a fleet—-and thus knows a lot about boats!!! He was giving me the encouragement but best of all he took a lot of his time to investigate the website to see if these boats look buildable and sea worthy…

After a few days of investigation I thought it was time to turn it over to LJ;s hoping to hear that some have built one or could tell me about other sites OR that these boats are worthless (I would rather know that now, lol)...

DaveR I will send you a PM…thank you so much…so far the forums have been dissappointing—-but I think I am so used to LJs where so many peeople are active…many of the links on the forums were old…but I will keep checking in there too…

Scully…I am definitely leaning to the Vacationer right now…

matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#11 posted 11-06-2009 09:27 AM

I was originally turned off by the fact that the Vacationer was “twice the price” to build of the Weekender, then I found that at the beginning of the decade the price to build was $1600 and I thought to myself, then that makes the Vacationer $3200 in 2002 dollars. Even if it’s four or five grand now to build, that’s not shabby for a 24 foot LOA/21 foot LOD boat. I’ve got a 21 footer that I paid $25K for in 2001 (and am still floating the boat note on).

BTW, DaveR, now I know where the Herreshoff table came from. I’m contantly amazed at how deep the bench is here on LJ’s…

Matt, after looking at how small the guy looks in the cockpit of the Weekender, I have to agree. I know they have warm fuzzies about the Weekender, but the Vacationer is just a bit more bang for your buck.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 4804 days


#12 posted 11-06-2009 01:40 PM

I looked at this project cam, & it made me kind of excited for you.

It looks like a fun, & challenging project.

If I were you, I wouldn’t put it off too long.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#13 posted 11-06-2009 06:39 PM

What? No lofting, no mold, what kind of boat building project is this? I’m about to order some marine grade plywood. Somebody stop me!

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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a1Jim

117721 posts in 4081 days


#14 posted 11-06-2009 06:58 PM

Looks like a great project and lots of fun when your through.

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#15 posted 11-07-2009 03:31 AM

i am more excited with every comment…thanks…

DIck…that is a cool cam…i spent 12 hours on the site on sunday—-read every word and looked at every page…when you get into the sample boats they often lead to individual stories and building pictures…it is pretty impressive…

Chris—-CAPT…I am still going vacationer…I got a PM from someone on the forums for this and he said the dvd is for the weekender but same construction techniques…but the plans are a little harder to read on the vacationer as if they have not upgraded them????

Daver…..your right—-of course lol YOU BUILT ONE…but in all the literature they talk about the rigidity as it all comes together…they keep mentioning as long as you keep all pieces on a “center line” then you will be fine…

I got a message from MIKE STEVENSON HIMSELF too…on the forum and he still pushed Weekender…but he sounded cool…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1288 posts in 4241 days


#16 posted 11-07-2009 04:23 AM

I would definitely build the Vacationer. It is most likely large enough to handle SF bay. You sill need to put as large a motor as possible to fight the currents. I remember racing 50’ to 65’ sailboats in the bay and dealing with the strong currents. Have fun and let us know which one you chose.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#17 posted 11-07-2009 04:25 AM

I think you’ll be happier with a boat that has a cockpit large enough for the whole family to be on deck at the same time (although the kids are usually being entertained by something below). We can figure out the differences between the Weekender and the Vacationer as needed. I was actually late for work today because I was going through the builder cam photos. Very cool!

If you mix a filler into the epoxy, this will allow you to make fillets that greatly strengthen all the intersecting planes. She should end up being pretty stiff. I noticed she has almost no garboard and absolutely no deadrise, which should make her pretty initially stable (meaning the wife and kids will feel safe). I’ve been percolating on what (if anything) I would change if I was to build one. I think maybe a boom gallows over the taffrail would give her a nice look and assist in trailering without a crutch.

The difficult part is picking a name. At least you don’t have to go through the procedure of changing a boat name if you build it.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#18 posted 11-07-2009 04:32 AM

lol…thanks guys…

Vacationer it is…pretty darn certain…

Chris what do you think about John’s concerns on the currents in the bay….I know nothing about sailing…and the SF/San Pablo bay will be my playground—-if these boats cant sail there safely and enjoyably then all bets are off…I cant see myself trailering the boat and traveling a long way to a big lake and using it…

I would/will do that at times…but the main use would be on the bay…

mat

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#19 posted 11-07-2009 04:48 AM

Good for you Matt. Don’t worry about the tidal currents. Six knots at max flood/ebb close to the Gate. That boat can sail at six knots downwind if needed. You’ll be fine up in San Pablo. At worst you’ll need to plan your outings around these kind of issues, like we all have to do. We have a boat in Emeryville that we can’t take out at a negative tide. You just account for things like this.

As far as a motor, you’ll probably need a 5HP four-stroke for the Vacationer to be able to safely take her where you want to go. I wouldn’t even think about a trolling motor for a boat that size considering there will be munchkins aboard.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#20 posted 11-07-2009 05:12 AM

thanks…i got a little worried…even though the boat is big—-they keep talking about it being VERY light and not needing a big engine…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#21 posted 11-07-2009 05:47 AM

See edit below:

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Blake's profile

Blake

3443 posts in 4379 days


#22 posted 11-07-2009 06:06 AM

I built a 16’ cabin cruiser sailboat from Glen-L designs. You should really consider their plans. They offer plans for all skill levels and specialize in “backyard” boat builders like us. My grandpa and I built it when I was a teenager. They are very helpful and their plans are easy to read. They also come with more instructions than most boat plans.

-- Happy woodworking!

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#23 posted 11-07-2009 06:06 AM

With a displacement of 750 pounds, with gear and crew, you could probably get by with a 4HP (1500 pound total displacement max). With a LOD of 21, even with a relatively lightweight boat, that should be plenty of power. There are just some times that you need a little more oomph (i.e. a cross-breeze and current in the fairway as you’re motoring toward the ramp).

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5623 posts in 4217 days


#24 posted 11-07-2009 06:39 AM

Looks like an exciting prospect, I look forward to progress pictures!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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TopamaxSurvivor

18671 posts in 4180 days


#25 posted 11-07-2009 06:52 AM

CaptianSkully, what’s the deal with the little boat with the square sail. Does it have a keel to keep it upright?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Rabbet's profile

Rabbet

35 posts in 3645 days


#26 posted 11-07-2009 07:33 AM

Hey Matt, Let me know when you’re going to start, I’ll give you hand.
-Rabbet

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#27 posted 11-07-2009 08:08 AM

Hey TopomaxSurvivor, that’s mattd’s tender (another LJ’s blog, see link above). It uses the skipper’s body weight and displaced water weight to keep it upright. It has just enough sail to move, but not overpower it. The center of effort of the sail is low to reduce heeling. Larger boats have a much more dynamic balancing act. If you’ll notice, Napaman’s boat has a gaff rigged sail plan (top of triangle is chopped off at an angle, see DaveR’s pics). This keeps the center of effort lower and reduces the leverage on the mast.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View bfd's profile

bfd

502 posts in 4311 days


#28 posted 11-07-2009 09:24 PM

Matt,

What a great undertaking that I know you are up for the challenge. Knowing absolutely nothing about sailing or boat building I am in complete awe. I spent about an hour last night on the site that you are looking to buy the plans from and about equal looking at the Glen-L site that Blake mentioned above. I was dreaming last night about building a boat and what a labor of love it would be. I cannot wait until you start. Looks like you are getting a lot of great advise.

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#29 posted 11-07-2009 09:32 PM

Hey Rabbet—-thanks!!! I would love all the help I can get…

I think this is the best part—-all the help…Thanks everyone…actually part of my excitement carried over to work and another teacher wants to build one too…so this could be a great group effort!!! Joey is a teracher too…so we time off together with many full days of work instead of just weekends…

Capt——I like the sounds of “Napaman’s boat has a…” thanks for the confidence…hope you are enjoying NEW YORK…

DaveR…thanks…I am enjoying all the information…like I told Cap Scully some of the boat terminology is over me but I will catch on…

One question (my wife asked the death question)—-How much will the vacationer/weekender cost in 2009 dollars…???

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#30 posted 11-07-2009 09:34 PM

Brian…I looked at the Glen L site too…it looks good…it was harder to tell about the skill level needed and support given…with the stevensproject boats there seems to be a lot of support on the forums…

matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

18671 posts in 4180 days


#31 posted 11-07-2009 11:26 PM

I have always been fascinated by sailboats. Just too far down on the priority list. I was just wondering if I could rig a sail on my 12 food Starcraft when I saw the picture of the tender. U any give it a try, but we normally don’t have much wind on the small lakes during good weather around here.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1288 posts in 4241 days


#32 posted 11-08-2009 01:44 AM

I just spent awhile looking through the Glen L and the Stevenson designs. They both have some very interesting designs. I still prefer the sleek lines of the Vacationer by Stevenson. It has very appealing and classic lines. I don’t think it will be too hard for you to build. The project cam really shows how to build it and looks pretty straight foreward. Not too intimidating. Let us know which one you choose.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#33 posted 11-08-2009 02:16 AM

Wow…thanks john…I am soooo amazed at all the people who have helped…all the time that many of you have spent just looking at and investigating the designs—-I cannot tell you all how much I appreciate these efforts…

This is really important to me because I am a novice wood worker—-thus knowing how solid these boats are by reading the plans is not possible for me at this stage…knowing for sure whether I can build this is not possible yet…however with all this help I am gaining confidende…

TOday DAveR spent 2 hours on the phone with me…it was really great…I learned a lot…

John I respect your work and experience very much—-so I thank you for your comments…I am leaning heavily towards the vacationer…just a bit bigger and since I see myself on the SF Bay with this as opposed to out on Lakes I think this is a good move…

Its bigger—-but in multiple places I have read that the cost is doubled and time to build is doubled…(not sure why doubled when boat is not double the size…)...

But knowing that I may have some physical help here in Napa (Rabbet is a great guy with a lot more skills then me…and if my colleague Joey wants to move forward I wont be alone)...

I should be pulling out my credit card this week for plans and the dvd…

When and if that happens…I will start the official blog…of course both our wives (Joey’s and mine) have reminded us of all our other projects…yada yada yada…lol….

well…just wanted to thank everyone…I trust all of your experience and knowledge much more then my own so this has been a lot of fun reading all the posts…

JOHN—-will we see you in SAC for the wood show…is that next week??? Yikes….

Matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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Splinterman

23074 posts in 3866 days


#34 posted 11-08-2009 02:45 AM

Hey Napaman,
Less talk…and more action….get on with it my boy…....you will love the experience and end result.
Best of luck.

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#35 posted 11-08-2009 06:50 AM

lol…hey..its only been a week…lol…but I am on it…went from a five year plan just 10 days ago…to buying plans THIS week…not fast enough???

love you splint!!! tonight i am making the free paper model from the web site…sounds dorky but helping me with the terminology…

thanks all…

matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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WayneC

14358 posts in 4602 days


#36 posted 11-08-2009 06:52 AM

I’m listening for the sound of a Shopsmith fireing up…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#37 posted 11-08-2009 06:59 AM

woooooof…was just about to turn off my noisy comp when I checked my computer and saw the BIG DOG chimed in…

cant wait to see you next week my friend…I have moved a bit past pens with this endeavor my friend!!! lol…

ok.,..got to log off…but thanks so much for checking in…

matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View Oberon's profile

Oberon

2 posts in 3626 days


#38 posted 11-08-2009 01:02 PM

Hi Matt
As you can see I found Lumberjocks.com OK
Have joined the site under nick name > Oberon

Ric Essler
from Down Under

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#39 posted 11-08-2009 05:12 PM

I’ll be building the model myself soon too, but probably out of wood (I also plan to build a half hull). Way to go Matt! Get those plans in the mail. BTW, I TOTALLY understand about those other projects. I promised a new dining room table by Turkey Day, but all of these other projects just popped up. I obviously am not going to argue with the Stevensons, but there is not an exponential relationship between boat length and expense/build time. If you had to buy 10’ plywood instead of 8’, I could understand the extra expense, but the comparisons of the plywood are probably the most expensive differences. I’m really excited for you and I think this has spurred a lot of interest and ties in nicely with pashley’s thread about our dream projects. I may have to head up to Napa once in a while…

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 4804 days


#40 posted 11-08-2009 06:18 PM

Hi Matt!

Once you start building this boat, you won’t have to call yourself a novice anymore.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#41 posted 11-08-2009 06:54 PM

true Dick…I dont know if I want to ride in a boat built by a novice!!!

Thanks Capn…I didnt think “double” could be accurate…John Ormsby sent me a PM and took some time (THANKS JOHN) at looking at the page and feels like it should come in at $5000 or less…

ANd everyone is in agreement that its the plywood that will be the big part of it all…

One last concern—-sent a PM to Mike Stevenson (designer) since he replied on one of my BYYB (Back Yard Builders Forum). I questioned him on the SF BAy…and my question to you Chris is, with your experience in sailing, can I go anywhere and everywhere in the SF Bay…or just pockets…I know NOT THE GATE…but can a take this boat and zig zag all over…

This is a big concern to me because I anticipate that this will be my playgorund…I dont see myself using the boat enough if I am taking it to lakes all over the place…on trips…I WILL DO THAT AT TIMES…but I know that the SF BAY which is huge and will keep me busy will be my playground…

Mike made a comment on BYYB that made it sound like (or just has me concerned) that there are soooome places in the bay that would be great—-does this mean the bay is too rough to go all over???

I know I wont be just using it to go all across…but I want that ability…when my sailing skills rise it would be fun to hop down to SF…Sausalito, Alameda, San Mateo (my sis is there), San Jose…

Also—-what is a BALL PARK figure on a slip??? Talkng to DaveR yesterday (THANKS DAVE) he said that the boats are definitely sailable on your own—-BUT getting them in and off the boat ramps on your own can be hard…on your own…that made me think it my be worth it to looking into a slip in Napa or Vallejo…then I could go out on my own whenever I wanted (assuming its a lot easier to launch from a slip)....

Ok…so many questions…lol…but this aint like building an adirondack chair!!! (that’s a joke for Rabbet)...

matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#42 posted 11-08-2009 07:16 PM

good ideas Dave…not sure on any of this…I am a thinker….too much…but I want to look at all angles…

I think for sure regardless I will need a motor…or is an outboard something differnet?...and the tiller was one question I was going to ask and forgot yesterday when we were talking…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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CaptainSkully

1611 posts in 4063 days


#43 posted 11-09-2009 02:06 AM

I agree with DaveArrgh. Now is the time to make those executive decisions like auxiliary power & tiller vs. wheel. Many sailboats have wells for an outboard to mount and drop the shaft into the water. You just have to make sure the well is above the waterline (no prob). Tillers will take up more precious cockpit space, but you’ll feel the boat better.

Everything about boats is a trade off. If you tuck the motor in the laz, you’ll have to have crew move to start/kill it. I like the idea of using the tank to counterbalance the motor. A transom hung rudder can add to the looks, and if you balance it forward of the gudgeons/pintles, underneath the transom, it’ll be very user friendly.

I forgot to add in my previous post that $4K is what I’d shoot for, depending on the outboard. Slips for a boat that size will be about $200/month, depending on location. Loch Lomond might be someplace to check out.

You will be able to go anywhere on the Bay that you want, you’ll just have to be careful of the Slot in the summer (like we all do). I like the idea of lengths of chain in the bilge for additional, easily removable ballast.

OK, I gotta run. We’re heading to McSorley’s!

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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TopamaxSurvivor

18671 posts in 4180 days


#44 posted 11-09-2009 02:17 AM

CaptS, are you saying you can fully build and rig the sail boat for 4K ?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#45 posted 11-09-2009 02:45 AM

Ok…more good info…

Good news…I can go anywhere in the bay—-that moves the plan forward…that was the question I was going to post to you Scully…that is my big concern to spend all the time and money and then not be able to go 20 minutes to use it…

BTW what is the “Slot”??? I am assuming a faster moving area that pulls you out to the gate?

On this note I spent some fun time on google earth—-soooo cool…just to look at the bay…its funny how when you imagine it is not the true shape…the upper part called the San Pablo Bay is rather circular and has its “neck” almost completely closed on the south end which I assuming will make it a good place for me to get started with and safer then the lower bay near SF??? But this was just a dumb history teacher looking at a map/picture of the planet…

$200 a month seems a bit steep…that may mean I am going to be a trailer hound and storing it in my back yard…which does bring me back to the original question to Dave——if I am thinking I may be soloing this thing from time to time maybe I should go with the Weekender…but you seemed to mention that the solo vs help is most necessary for the launch/retreival at the ramp. Thus if the need for assistance is at the ramp then does it make a difference with the Vacationer…sorry—-this seems like the same question…i have already asked…lol

JUST BUILD IT ALREADY right SPLINTERMAN!!! ????

And BTW….I did have the all important talk with the boss…still a green light… :)

So Dave—-is there no anchor for this boat???

Again thanks guys…I am going to buy plans this week…today I worked on a back yard project I had neglected…so this is going to be good motivation…

matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#46 posted 11-09-2009 03:43 AM

I just spent some time on woodenboats forum…and lol…the comments were scaring me…

Here is the thread I was reading through…most of the negative thoughts were by people who had never built or sailed one…but not all…

once again…the sailability question concerns me on SF BAy…(SORRY SCULLY)...I will trust you…lol for sure…you know the bay and what I need…

ok..i gotta log off for the night…too much time on this…lol…sorry for keeping you all busy too!!!

matt

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14358 posts in 4602 days


#47 posted 11-09-2009 03:46 AM

How is the sailing in Lake Berryessa? That should be fairly close.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#48 posted 11-09-2009 03:54 AM

lol…I know…I know—-it was exactly like you said…I was checking it out because Mattd who is building his awesome boat wrote me a very nice PM…and there were lots of good comments…but…not all lol…

Wayne—-yes Lake Berryessa would be very close…and so is Tomales Bay which is a part of Pt Reyes…North of SF…those would both be good…

I just see myself going up and down the Napa river and into the bay…or launching at vallejo which would be 20 minutes…

all good options…either way its my FIRST BOAT right??? lol…ok…now I gotta log off before I go crazy…lol…

thanks…I WILL BUILD IT>>>>lol…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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Blake

3443 posts in 4379 days


#49 posted 11-10-2009 03:50 AM

Boats are fun. A LOT of work. A LOT of problem-solving. No matter how good the plans/instructions/support are, there will be a lot of self-teaching involved.

If you’ve never built a boat before, take the time and money you estimate that it will take you to build it and multiply by 4. I’ve built two now.

I didn’t read the thread closely enough to catch whether you’ve ordered the plans or not but choosing a plan is the most crucial part of the whole process. There is a lot to consider. It is easy to outgrow a boat before you’ve even finished building it. But if you choose a plan too big or complex, you may never see it finished.

A MUST HAVE book collection for any prospective boat builder is the trilogy by “Wooden Boat”: Thirty Wooden Boats, Forty Wooden Boats and Fifty Wooden Boats.

Even if you think you know what plans you want, these are a must read ahead of time. You will get all kinds of insight as to the variations that are out there, and some examples of REALLY good design.

Another nightstand essential is How to Build a Wooden Boat by David C. McIntosh. Its beautifully written and illustrated, and will HUMBLE you like you wouldn’t believe.

That ought to get you started.

-- Happy woodworking!

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Napaman

5530 posts in 4581 days


#50 posted 11-10-2009 04:16 AM

Thanks Blake..I agree…and thanks for the book links…I will take some time and look at them…the last one I had from the library and flipped through it (it may still be in my stack—-I better check lol)...

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

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