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All Replies on Grizzly or Woodmaster dual drum sander?

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View bigblockyeti's profile

Grizzly or Woodmaster dual drum sander?

by bigblockyeti
posted 02-26-2016 01:04 PM


18 replies so far

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

125 posts in 1398 days


#1 posted 02-26-2016 07:38 PM

I have been working as a full time cabinet maker for over 35yrs. and have had the opportunity to work with a number of Grizzly drum sanders and every single one of them was a piece of junk.We had nothing but problems with them.I haven’t worked with the woodmaster but have heard good things about them.I have worked with the powermatic
(don’t remember what size)and I was impressed.ultimately a wide belt sander is the best way to go,but they are ridiculously expensive.

I hope this helps and good luck

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too! Ask me how I know

View Drew's profile

Drew

350 posts in 3610 days


#2 posted 02-26-2016 07:49 PM



... and have had the opportunity to work with a number of Grizzly drum sanders and every single one of them was a piece of junk.We had nothing but problems with them
.....ultimately a wide belt sander is the best way to go,but they are ridiculously expensive.

I hope this helps and good luck

- chiseler

Guessing you haven’t used a G0449. Pretty impressive for a drum sander.

-- TruCraftFurniture.com

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

125 posts in 1398 days


#3 posted 02-26-2016 07:58 PM


... and have had the opportunity to work with a number of Grizzly drum sanders and every single one of them was a piece of junk.We had nothing but problems with them
.....ultimately a wide belt sander is the best way to go,but they are ridiculously expensive.

I hope this helps and good luck

- chiseler

Guessing you haven t used a G0449. Pretty impressive for a drum sander.

- Drew


I don’t believe that I have.Is it a newer model? the ones that I have used just left a bad taste in my mouth I guess

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too! Ask me how I know

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5976 posts in 2230 days


#4 posted 02-26-2016 09:25 PM

I looked at the G0449 and that would be really nice for being able to sand doors sometime down the line, but for now I’m quite sure I don’t have the dust collection to support a machine that could generate that much dust. I might still consider it if I could find one around $1200.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1584 posts in 3577 days


#5 posted 02-26-2016 10:13 PM

I’ve got a good bit of Grizz and the larger tools are pretty good. I’ve not used woodmaster personally but been up close to some wood masters, and i would put them above a grizzly. I own a griz 12” jointer, 17” bs, and had a 10” TS

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 3200 days


#6 posted 02-27-2016 01:10 AM

Can’t comment on the drum sander but I have an 18” Woodmaster planer that has been tortured and performed flawlessly. The Woodmaster guys are great to deal with and I get blades/parts very quickly. Their Leeson motors are tough and reliable.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1430 days


#7 posted 02-27-2016 01:27 AM

bigblockyeti,

I have a Woodmaster W-3875 single drum sander bought new in 2009. I also own a Woodmaster W-712 12” Planer, bought new in 1991. My woodworking is a hobby, so these machines do not get the use they would in a cabinet shop.

I think a lot of the Woodmaster brand for several reasons. The machines offer a simple and straightforward design. These machines can be fixed if a part every fails – which has yet to happen. The company offers a wide area of supporting products. I have had no reason to contact the company, so I remain mute regarding customer service. It seems that every piece of equipment they sell is equipped with a 5 hp brand name motor. The drum sander came with a Leeson motor.

The Woodmaster machine is, based on my experience, a good bet. My planer has been going strong since 1991. I have had no issues with the newer drum sander either.

If you were to select the Woodmaster, a couple of add-ons you may want to consider are the Woodmaster infeed and outfeed rollers. These extend the sanding bed. Also I highly recommend a reversing switch. This $100 add-on, with the feed roller extension, allows you to never leave your position near the switch and the elevation crank. After the lumber clears the sanding drum, reverse the bed direction and the lumber comes back to you. While dust collection with a CV1800 and a 5” port picks up almost all the dust as the lumber disappears from view, when it re-emerges using the reversing switch, some dust remains, which I wipe off.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5976 posts in 2230 days


#8 posted 02-27-2016 02:04 AM

Thanks for all the input, I am leaning toward the Woodmaster, but as it’s a used machine I don’t know when I’ll be able to look at it or if it’ll still be there when I can.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Robert's profile

Robert

3537 posts in 1990 days


#9 posted 02-27-2016 11:28 AM

I have a dual drum Grizzly 16”. I wouldn’t say its a POS but it is certainly not a well made machine.

I had crazy trouble keeping the sanding belts on until I upgraded to hook and loop (I think all the WM sanders are H/L). It will burn the wood pretty quickly I think the feed rate is too slow.

I’ve checked out WM it is no doubt a much higher quality machine.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1430 days


#10 posted 02-27-2016 04:00 PM

bigblockyeti, (Regarding 02-26-2016 04:25 PM Post)

I must say that the drum sander took away the dread of flattening panel glue-ups. It still takes some time, but nowhere near the time or effort to flatten the glue-ups the old fashioned way by hand way. It is a tool I recommend if you have the budget and the space.

No doubt, the better the dust collection, the better the finished product, the longer the sand paper will last, and the less dust floating around the shop. But a high powered duct collector is not a requirement, but a dust collector outfitted with a separator would be good – too keep the filter from clogging. I used the Woodmaster 38” single drum sand with a 1/2 hp dust collection with a shop built cyclone for about 5 years. The dust collector got most of the dust, but I did brush off the dust from the surface of the stock before sending it through the drum sander again. I believe keeping dust off the panel prolongs paper life and yields better and faster results. Sure it slows the sanding operation, but it is still way easier and faster than the old fashioned way.

View ous's profile

ous

64 posts in 3164 days


#11 posted 02-27-2016 04:46 PM

I agree with Chiseler. If you can afford a wide belt sander and have a dust collection system to handle the dust it is the way to go. It is easy to change belts to any grit you want where with a drum sander you are pretty much stuck with one grit unless you go to a lot of work. Another thing I like about a belt sander is when the belts become loaded I put them in a barrel of water let them soak and the wash them with a pressure washer and reuse them. I use a lot of sanding sealer on wanes coating and other work. I let it get very dry and then use a loaded 180 belt as a buffer belt and the work comes out very smooth ready for other final finishes. I am 92 and have had my wide belt sander for years. No more aching joints from hand belt sanders.

-- Roy Montana

View Woodn88s's profile

Woodn88s

82 posts in 4051 days


#12 posted 02-28-2016 04:56 PM

I bought a used Woodmaster 3875 in 2005. I used it daily in my cabinet shop/woodworking business till I retired in 2015. I loved this machine and as I was downsizing from my 3000 sq.ft.shop to my current 900 sq. ft. shop I starting selling some of my larger machines and the WM was one of them. Now that my new retirement shop is fully functional I sure miss my sander. My sander ran flawlessly for yrs and I sold it to another shop and they still use it. Customer service at woodmaster tools is great.
I cant say much about grizzly sanders, but I am going to purchase the Woodmaster 26” model for my smaller shop.
It’s not a wide belt but once you get used to these machines they are well worth the money.
I highly recommend the variable speed feed for the belt.
Good luck with this.

-- I want to know Gods thoughts....rest are details "A. Einstein"

View Robert's profile

Robert

3537 posts in 1990 days


#13 posted 02-28-2016 09:17 PM

JBrow,

Unless you’re using a sled, I’ve never been able to flatten a cupped panel with a planer or drum sander.

Drum sanders, like planers are “garbage in garbage out”.
You still have to start with a reasonably flat panel.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1430 days


#14 posted 02-29-2016 01:42 AM

rwe2156,

You are right, when a cupped, warped or whatever panel passes under the drum sander rollers, it will flatten the cupped panel while under the drum and then the panel springs back when it emerges – especially 3/4” and thinner panels. I probably should have said “flush-up” rather than “flatten”. I guess I just exposed my feeble understanding of English.

View finns's profile

finns

169 posts in 3626 days


#15 posted 02-29-2016 06:20 PM

I have the W2675 and am happy with it. I did consider similar Grizzly models but the woodmaster seemed like it may be better value. I’ve owned it for just about a year now and seems to run well… far better than a few other Grizzly tools I own. Don’t think you’ll go wrong with the W2675.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5976 posts in 2230 days


#16 posted 02-29-2016 09:46 PM

Do the Woodmasters have hook & loop paper or is the paper clamped under tension? My concern with hook & loop is that it would cost more and would offer a more softer registration surface as opposed to sandpaper with a hard drum directly behind it.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1368 posts in 1430 days


#17 posted 03-01-2016 12:46 AM

bigblockyeti,

The Woodmaster sanding drum has a hook and loop fastening system. You are probably correct in that there may some give when a panel contacts the drum. Once the board is under the drum, the amount of material removed is consistent since any give is taken up with that first contact.

I have found no performance issues because of the hook and loop system. Woodmaster recommends a high feed rate with multiple passes and small changes in the depth of cut. Following their recommendations I get very smooth panels with parallel faces. If this recommendation is not followed, very slight scallops across the width of the panel all along its length can be felt. I am not sure why a slow feed rate does this and perhaps it is because of the hook and loop system – but then again maybe not; I just do not know.

I have no observable wear in the hook and loop fastener with the light cuts I take. A few weeks ago I replaced the 80 grit paper and the hook and loop system looked brand new except for the spiral band of dust at the seam of the old paper.

A 25 yard roll of Mirka Jepuflex Anitstatic P80 felt backed paper cost $70. They claim one roll gives 8 changes on their 26” drum sander. The 80 grit paper does a lot of cutting before it needs replaced. However, resinous woods like pine gum up the paper. I found this out the hard way the one and only time I ran some pine through the sander.

I cannot speak to a hard drum and adhesive backed sand paper since I have never used a machine so equipped. However, it seems to me that removing and installing adhesive back paper would be a chore and take longer than the hook and loop.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5976 posts in 2230 days


#18 posted 03-01-2016 03:03 PM

One of the things I’d like this thing to do for me is sand down end grain cutting boards where there may be very slight undulations and a little glue (very little) here and there. I would want the result to be flat and smooth rather than lumpy and smooth which is why hook & loop concerns me a little. Ideally I would get the same flatness that a planer would generate minus the tear out and potential explosion from trying to run end grain through a planer. Hook & loop does however sound far more convenient for being able to quickly change to different grits.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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