LumberJocks

All Replies on Seriously: Why not vent dust collectors outside?

  • Advertise with us
View JasonWagner's profile

Seriously: Why not vent dust collectors outside?

by JasonWagner
posted 09-15-2009 04:50 AM


1 2 3 4 next »
181 replies

181 replies so far

View Durnik150's profile

Durnik150

647 posts in 4295 days


#1 posted 09-15-2009 05:34 AM

You are not alone in venting to the outside. I was very surprised to see that The Wood Whisperer vented to the outside at his old shop. I’m not sure what he will be doing now that he has relocated. It appeared he had a little land around his house so it’s not like he would have been blasting his neighbors with the dust either.

I did learn a little something about Walnut dust a few weeks ago. Walnut trees create a chemical in their roots that prohibits growth in other trees. They do this so there is less competition for the sunlight in the canopy. The chemical remains in the wood and the resulting sawdust can actually kill trees if it is spread around the yard. Just something to keep in mind if you work in a lot of walnut or if your vent would blow material on other trees.

-- Behind the Bark is a lot of Heartwood----Charles, Centennial, CO

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3638 posts in 4411 days


#2 posted 09-15-2009 05:39 AM

Hmmm.. what if one vented outside with an elbow facing downward into a trash can. Some of the dust would scatter but I’d think most of it would end up in the can. A cleaner shop, no dangerous dust and no back pressure from the open port. Hmmm.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#3 posted 09-15-2009 05:42 AM

Thanks for the reply. I wish I worked with a lot of walnut! I’m just a “for fun and function amature” and mostly use MDF/pine/plywood/poplar/maple. Also, I’m thinking that this ejection under my deck on plain old dirt won’t have much of an effect on the neighboring plants (all around 12 feet away).

I mean, most of the noise of the motor is still inside and it’s not too loud anyway. Second, only dust being blown onto dirt that I don’t want stuff to grow on…can’t be bad. Only problem is how to vent to the outside. I’ve got a poured concrete wall and a small basement window I can probably make a jig for. I can vent the basement when the DC is on.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#4 posted 09-15-2009 05:43 AM

not a bad idea Craftsman…why not do a little effort for a big reward…

Does anyone else vent outside? Seems like the ultimate answer to dust collection!

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 4683 days


#5 posted 09-15-2009 06:07 AM

If you forget to open the window during heating season you will get a shop (house) full of CO. not sure I’d want to risk it. also here in Hew England (or anyplace else with cold winters) you would be venting a lot of expensive heated air out side

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118153 posts in 4550 days


#6 posted 09-15-2009 06:14 AM

I vent mine outside to a drum inside a dog house . Works great no problimo.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#7 posted 09-15-2009 06:15 AM

OK, so I’ve seen similar posts. I don’t heat or cool my shop. In the summer it’s cool in the winter it’s warm enough. Yeah, I’ll lose some heat or cool in the summer but does it ever add up to no fine dust in the workshop/house? I mean, pushing some A/C or heat out of my house isn’t much more than any other little woodshop expenditure. I’m really starting to form a strong opinion that we should vent dust outside.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 5073 days


#8 posted 09-15-2009 06:21 AM

Fredf provides one of the best points. The dust collector would create a negative air pressure in the shop and it would require a fresh air intake. If a large enough air intake is not provided, the negative air pressure will pull air back down the flue for the hot water tank and the furnace if they are gas fired. This will drag carbon monoxide into the living space.

If fresh air is provided to prevent this it is not a problem.

I have seen pro shops and hobbyists do this and there is always a layer of dust all over the area. It gets on everything and I was put off by it but they seemed fine with it. Before I saw this I had considered doing the same.

In all reality, given the safety consideration you could always try it and see how it works with your equipment.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1384 posts in 4515 days


#9 posted 09-15-2009 07:00 AM

If I vented my dust outside it would land in a mountain stream that is now protected by all the environmentalist so I would be..”up my creep without a paddle”. But, my neighbors ride their lawn mowers over with their trailers connected and we empty the bags into them so they can mix it with other stuffs and use it for mulch in their gardens. They want all the cypress we run for their flower beds so they take turns on a list we have. I’ve known them all my life so maybe that helps to keep their mouthy comments down when I’m making a lot of noise late into the night sometimes. Relief that the closest neighbor is about 75 yards away with plenty of trees between us and I think the youngest is about 78. Guess who they call when in need…especially when we have to use our generators…US! lol but we sure love all of them.

bruc

-- Bruce Free Plans https://traditionalwoodworking.org

View Blake's profile

Blake

3443 posts in 4847 days


#10 posted 09-15-2009 08:07 AM

I vent mine out the back wall. My shop is on three acres of family land. And my back wall faces down a steep-sloping hill. I also dump a lot of my dust/chips/wood waste down the hill too. Its perfect for my situation but cant work for everyone. I live in coastal California so the heating/cooling is not a problem, and my shop is 100 yards away from the house.

Good discussion. Interesting note about walnut dust killing trees. I never thought of that.

-- Happy woodworking!

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1989 posts in 4437 days


#11 posted 09-15-2009 04:21 PM

I’ve been considering the same thing. I was going to vent under the wing shed but considered the dust layer. I was going to use a baffled box to slow the air and let dust settle before exiting. I know it wouldn’t catch it all but it’s mostly garden stuff and stored lumber anyway. Was talking to the wife while reading this, she suggested just letting it vent between the barns and letting it settle in the yard that may become horse lot anyway. I don’t have immediate neighbors to worry about, yea!!!!!!!!!
Another advantage I’ve been told, is when the bags and exhaust resistance is removed, the static pressure goes way up and dramatically increase collection ability.
There’s my rambling and two cents. I’m going to give it a try. BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#12 posted 09-16-2009 01:24 AM

I’m going to be mounting the blower up near the ceiling on a concrete wall, run the exhaust a few feet with 6” pipe and out some sort of self-closing vent. The intake will be a straight shot down to the floor where my separator is with a three gang box nearby. This might take a week or two but I’ll post some results when I’m done. Not a huge loss if I don’t end up keeping the setup.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3638 posts in 4411 days


#13 posted 09-16-2009 12:10 PM

I just had an inspirational mindstorm. Run the dust collector outlet into the attic. Let the rafters fill up with shavings. Apply for an energy credit for adding insulation and doing it the ‘green’ way. Use the money to purchase a proper dust collector with a high capacity filter.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

797 posts in 4283 days


#14 posted 09-17-2009 06:06 PM

Wow, I thought everyone felt the long arm of the ‘Air Quality control Board’ as I do in Central California. Were I to be caught without adequate collection system in position, I would surely be shut down and fined.

It is my understanding the complete nation will soon be under similiar air quality standards.

I would be fearfull of building a layer of dust under a deck, as a small spark may turn into a major event, all-to-quickly.

Just my $.02

-- Rustfever, Central California

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

665 posts in 4240 days


#15 posted 09-17-2009 09:29 PM

another thought about heating and cooling is you will in affect be sucking climate controlled air down the tubes so to speak

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5777 posts in 4205 days


#16 posted 09-17-2009 10:01 PM

Several reasons.

#1. Typically home hobby workshops are smaller, enclosed spaces. Garages, Basements and the like… #2. In many cases, venting outdoors is not a realistic option. Do you want to explain to a potential buyer of your home why there is a 4, or 6” hole in the brick side of the garage? #3. Heating / cooling efficiencies. So you are going to suck all that air conditioned air and blow it outside? How good of an idea is that? #4. Environmental concerns. If the ultra fine particles are bad for you inside, they are still bad for you outside. You are merely moving an air quality problem. While we are not under California like oppressive regulations on air quality here in Texas, a responsible citizen takes care of what he has without being forced to… Because if they don’t they WILL eventually be forced to.

I will start another thread on a related subject. But to get y’all primed for the question…

What do you do with the dust you collect?

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#17 posted 09-17-2009 11:48 PM

Thanks for all the comments. I knew some would be polarized. Maybe I should have titled it, why shouldn’t I vent outside.

Even everyone’s hero Bill Pentz says a small hobby shop should just vent the fine stuff outside. I guess I should reiterate that I’m a “hobby” woodworker who does a project every now and then. I empty the separator occasionally and the dust bag every 6 months or more.

The vent will not be visible even if I told you were it was.

Basement air is not climate controlled and air intakes to the furnace are on the first floor. I crack a window and have very localized warming or cooling, but for a few minutes at a time…no big deal.

And I’m safe because I don’t live in Texas or CA… ;-) My firepit or lawn mower pollute the air more than my dust output will be. Mind you my nearest neighbor is 100 yards away and the rest are even farther.

What if you had a nice cyclone that barely puts any dust into the filter…then would some of you say putting it outside was good? Just a question.

And here’s an answer: the dust I collect goes in the trash.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13345 posts in 4646 days


#18 posted 09-18-2009 12:46 AM

My shop is a 10×12 shed, so there is no need to vent! I also run a Jet DC1100 dust collector.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5777 posts in 4205 days


#19 posted 09-18-2009 10:14 PM

Let’s say for example your vent is into a flower bed where it blows into a reasonably dense bush that gets watered relatively frequently… Your output air would have a reasonable chance of having the fines taken even further out of it… I can see doing something like that as quite reasonable…

Now to be the Devil’s advocate as it were. The blowers are designed to work with a certain amount of backpressure, or resistance to air flow. How would removing the backpressure impact the performance and longevity of the blower motor?

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#20 posted 09-19-2009 12:10 AM

Are the blowers designed to work with a certain amount of backpressure? In my head (ie. might be totally wrong), an internal combustion engine relies on backpressure for torque and horsepower but an electric motor spinning at a predetermined RPM should last longer with less of a load on it. I’ve read of people venting outside and having scrubbing issues in separators because of the CFM increase. I could be totally wrong.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1186 posts in 4452 days


#21 posted 09-19-2009 12:56 AM

How much air leaves the house on a Saturday when 5-6 loads of clothes go thru the dryer?

At my house that could be several hours of exhaust leaving. Not saying it is the same of course, just pondering this issue.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3638 posts in 4411 days


#22 posted 09-19-2009 12:59 AM

I think that the amount of air that leaves the dryer is insignificant considering the amount of heat that the dryer produces and then vents outside.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20031 posts in 4649 days


#23 posted 09-19-2009 03:35 AM

The blower motors shouldn’t care about less load. They need to be sized to provide sufficient CFM to move the chips and dust then force the exhaust through the desired size of filtration system. I can’t imagine any of these systmes being affected by the lack of back pressure. If you are removing chips from 20,000 square feet of manufacturing facility, that could be another matter:-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1027 posts in 4459 days


#24 posted 09-19-2009 04:17 AM

OK Blake, I spent about 45 minutes looking at your shop pictures, expecially that dewalt RAS, so my envy meter is pretty high about now. And you have the nerve to say temperature is not a problem year round in your shop. I live in Houston where you just don’t go outside in the summer. A place where your paste wax will melt to a fine liquid, right in the can, the first day of June.

Shame on you to JasonWagner. Cool in summer. gee thanks ;>)

-- Better woodworking through old hand tools.

View jwicks's profile

jwicks

54 posts in 4581 days


#25 posted 09-19-2009 04:51 AM

Jason, there is a good discussion about load on the motor when venting outside on Sawmill Creek. Specifically the posts by Rick. Here is his basic summary:

..snip..
Unrestricted exhaust is not going to increase motor load.

If you remove restriction from the inlet, then the blower can be over taxed because too much air is present than can be evacuated. If you block the inlet, then the blower operates in a vacuum condition, and motor load decreases.

The reverse is true at the outlet. When you remove restriction at the outlet, the pressure differential between the inlet to the outlet is reduced and the motor doesn’t need to work as hard. When you obstruct the outlet, the pressure differential is greater, and the motor needs to work harder.
..snip..

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?p=1089161#poststop

-- Jon

View pauldeo's profile

pauldeo

18 posts in 4299 days


#26 posted 09-19-2009 04:54 AM

OK, so throwing my input into the ring:

Venting
On the issue of venting outdoors, numerous species of wood cause many adverse reactions in people, from simply irritating to full blown allergic. I know I am personally a little sensitive to walnut dust, but that doesn’t stop me from using plenty of it. But would outdoor venting of the fine particulate matter be a potential irritant for your neighbors? You are talking about venting the fine dust outside, which is exactly the material which can and will be blown around by even a mild breeze. By an air cleaner and eliminate the potential for problems. In ou rlitigous society, who knows what kind of headache you are asking for.

Disposal
I sell my dust/chips to a local farm for $1/per contractor bag full, which they in turn use for animal bedding. on a good week, my shop produces 20-25 bags per week. and on heavy planing orders, i have ammased that many in just a few hours. Selling it to the farm beats hauling it to the dump or paying a dumpster fee. *One VERY important note on this – Walnut is very detrimental to animal’s hooves. So if you go the route I have, make sure you don’t contaminate your dust collectings with any walnut or the really really exotic stuff. Cherry, maple, oak, poplar, pine, ash, beech, birch, etc are safe. basically any of the standard fair of domestics, and even most similar imports are ok.

View rickf16's profile

rickf16

394 posts in 4554 days


#27 posted 09-19-2009 04:55 AM

I have a 10X12 shed/shop. It backs up to the woods. I blow everything into the woods. I mounted the motor to the wall upside down and drilled a 4” hole in the back wall of my shop. Works like a charm.

-- Rick

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20031 posts in 4649 days


#28 posted 09-19-2009 05:31 AM

That’s KOOL, return it right back to where it came from :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View longgone's profile

longgone

5688 posts in 4282 days


#29 posted 09-19-2009 06:07 AM

I recently purchased a 7 inch “Y” connector to hook up to my dust collector outlet. I have a 1400 cfm Oneida cyclone system…Both legs of the “Y” have a blast gate and one leg will go to the filter and one leg vented to the outside of my shop. This offers the Best of both worlds since I can vent outside when the weather is nice and my doors and windows are open and I can vent it into the filter when I run the A/C or heater.

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1989 posts in 4437 days


#30 posted 09-20-2009 05:01 AM

Greg, I like your solution. BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#31 posted 09-23-2009 04:50 AM

I’ll post some pictures soon, but I mounted the motor and blower housing of my Jet DC1100 to my basement (solid concrete pour) wall. (side note: man was that thing hard to hold up on the wall while on a short ladder, I’m still paying for that!) Then I put my chip separator under it and also added the famous Thein separator baffle. I have a Jet separator lid and a 37 gallon tub below it. I didn’t vent it outside yet, but couldn’t wait to try the setup out. I have recently added a three gang blast gate box I made from ShopNotes magazine. I turned it all on and threw fine dust from my shopvac into the system and saw nothing come out the exhaust that I will be venting outside. The separator works great as far as I can tell on a small sample. With my small shop usage I don’t think I’ll be able to tell I’m venting outside except for the fact that I won’t be introducing fine dust into my shop.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1989 posts in 4437 days


#32 posted 09-23-2009 07:08 AM

Great follow-up. I hope to hear about the real world trials. BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 4671 days


#33 posted 10-13-2009 03:49 AM

Great idea.

View WindwoodTrader's profile

WindwoodTrader

14 posts in 4151 days


#34 posted 10-13-2009 05:07 PM

Termite has the right idea. The thought of shooting my bought and paid for, or worked for hot shop air into the atmosphere in January leaves me cold!

The idea of a split discharge is neat, especially if your January’s range to -25 Farenheit like mine do.

-- John

View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1418 posts in 4519 days


#35 posted 10-13-2009 05:20 PM

just a thought, I don’t know if it would be a problem or not, but what about TERMITES, if the sawdust is on the ground, would it draw termites? if so, it would not be good to have a pile of sawdust too close to the house.
just asking, maybe an exterminator out there would have an answer.

-- Smitty!!!

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1288 posts in 4710 days


#36 posted 10-13-2009 08:09 PM

Termite’s setup is ideal. I would recommend one use a high quality filter when heating the shop and using the collector with the filter connected. Here is a link to some very high quality filters. I like to use 2 of the 9L300BL filters connected together. Two of these filters connected together will give one the proper air return necessary for the dust system to function properly without major reduction in CFM draw at the machine. One filter puts does not allow enough air to pass through for efficient flow.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#37 posted 10-13-2009 11:25 PM

So far on my scale of woodworking I’ve seen no dust make it outside. I have the blower mounted on the wall, the chip separator below it with a Thein baffle built in, then off to the tools. I don’t have a way to measure the air flow but I do know that the separator causes a decent amount of static loss. It is doing OK for what I want at the moment. I agree that this isn’t for everyone. If you run your dust collector for extended periods of time this isn’t for you. I turn mine on with the remote, make the cut and turn it off. I have a window that I can pop open and closed easily. When it’s nice out it’ll just stay open, when it’s not I’ll go through the pain of opening it and closing it. I didn’t however spend any money for my adjusted setup. In the future if I out grow this it will only be a matter of patching a hole in a soffit under my deck that no one can see. Thanks for everyone’s opinions, concerns and ideas. It made me think about a few things.

dust blower

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View llamadave's profile

llamadave

6 posts in 4106 days


#38 posted 10-28-2009 04:41 PM

Great discussion guys! I have my Jet DC1100 in my garage which is next to my basement shop. I leave a garage window ajar and this keeps the noise and fine dust out of my shop. After reading above I plan to install a Y to the outside. I might even bury a drain pipe under the back yard into the woods where I dump my chips anyway.

I have not noticed a change in the house temp in summer or winter when running the collector for hours straight. Also, I never have downdrafts from the chimney (we heat with wood). Here is why. The volume of my house is about 60,000 cubic feet, so it takes an hour for the collector to change the air in the house. When we built our house we were told it would have a complete air change every 1-2 hours. Houses tighter than this need an air heat exchanger to keep from building up toxic dust and fumes. The furnace/air conditioner has to heat this air in addition to heat that goes through the walls and windows and to overcome solar heating in the summer. So the dust collector is a relatively small load on the HVAC system. And our house, a typical one, has plenty of leaks to stop downdrafts.

-- David, West Lafayette, https://REDIpix.com, https://Photo-Lamps.com

View llamadave's profile

llamadave

6 posts in 4106 days


#39 posted 10-29-2009 01:30 AM

Well, that was a quick calculation assuming a rectangular solid. A more accurate number is 40,000 cu ft. This includes three floors and a full basement, all having air ducts, and ceilings 10,9,8,8 ft. My wife told me since I posted above that she has smelled downdrafts from the masonry wood heater (I am in the shop when the fan is on!) but this is not a regular thing. We do have several CO detectors and they have never registered anything. I will probably have more of a problem when I vent outside.

-- David, West Lafayette, https://REDIpix.com, https://Photo-Lamps.com

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2080 posts in 3613 days


#40 posted 03-28-2011 07:25 AM

I’ll be venting to the outside from a closet in my garage. I am optimistic that the separator will get nearly everything.

This is a great thread. I thought I had considered everything, but the termites comments really got me !

I wonder if pygmy goats will eat pine, oak, maple, birch and mdf fines ?

I wonder if they make 5 micron (or better) oat sacks?

Hmmm

Seriously, I think it goes to volume output… not only what percent makes it to the outside, but the total amount and time in a typical week. I will collect less than 8 hours a week (if that). I won’t be planing or turning on a lathe. I hope to put very little evidence on the mulched flower bed around the loquat tree.

I can see where venting outside would be a bad idea for some (high volume, no separator, local codes, proximity to neighbors, etc.) but on the other hand a great idea for others with their set of not-so-constraints.

We’ll see.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View pvwoodcrafts's profile

pvwoodcrafts

244 posts in 4895 days


#41 posted 03-28-2011 02:36 PM

You have to replace the air blown outside.Lets say your DC is moving 2000 cfm. If you blow it outside where is the replacement air coming from? I worked in a shop once with a 25 hp DC. It sucked open doors that werent latched, drafts at every crack, I mean MAJOR drafts, and drew all smoke down the flue and into the shop.This was after we moved into a brand new shop. We had to vent it inside and still had to put a blower on the flue to keep the smoke going the right way while we were working. Never could keep the place above 60 in the winter.

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com [email protected]

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

12291 posts in 4402 days


#42 posted 03-28-2011 03:12 PM

My shop is only 36X24. Very well insulated and heated with a ProComm propane heater which runs about 8 hrs per day in the winter. I monitor gas usage religiously and have seen no increase since venting my DC to the outside.
With a separator inline, only the finest of dust reaches the outside.
BTW, we live in the high desert with the closest neighbor over a 1/2 mile away and, his horses are certainly more of an nasal nuisance than my sawdust.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View JBfromMN's profile

JBfromMN

107 posts in 3750 days


#43 posted 03-28-2011 03:18 PM

I have thought about venting to the outside as well. Living in MN not so sure I want to loose all of the heat. Welll this is the second year with the shop out in the garage and I am finding I do not do much out there in the winter anyhow. I have a model railroad in my basement, another VERY expensive hobby btw, that takes up my winter months.

So i am thinking if I am only out there working when it is warm out, why not vent out side. I may still put in some sort of Y in so I can have the option of filter or outside.

View cornflake's profile

cornflake

36 posts in 3664 days


#44 posted 03-28-2011 03:24 PM

i think i have a solution to this problem!

if you want to vent outside have the hose that would blow all those fine dust particles in a 55 gallon drum full of water! that way no dust is actully going in the air problem solved. What do you guys think?

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20031 posts in 4649 days


#45 posted 03-28-2011 05:59 PM

It will take a lot more HP to blow into the water. You will probably lose all your sucking power in the shop.

pvwoodcrafts Sounds like your new shop was in serious need of a real engineer to design the air handling system. Situations like that is why make up air units are installed ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View pvwoodcrafts's profile

pvwoodcrafts

244 posts in 4895 days


#46 posted 03-28-2011 06:02 PM

cornflake tried that, didn’t work.
topomax that was in a large grinding shop that I did 15 years in. It was designed by an engineer , a very overpaid engineer as for what to do with the shavings , I have a large 2 stage container on wheels. The neighbor comes and gets it when full

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com [email protected]

View Puzzleman's profile

Puzzleman

417 posts in 3917 days


#47 posted 03-28-2011 07:00 PM

I vent my dust and chips into a $200 cyclone that is mounted outside. I have it set up as a push so I can just attach a plastic bag to the bottom. The discharge is very fine as i can’t see anything coming out of the exhaust even with my glasses on.

Do have a problem sometimes when it gets below 10 outside but other than that the shop is fairly warm. Would rather have it a little chilly than have the dust.

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

View Larry Parrish's profile

Larry Parrish

9 posts in 3604 days


#48 posted 03-28-2011 07:34 PM

My plan is to build an airtight insulated closet, Big enuf to fit my dust collector in. Run duct into workshop and put a return vent in the wall to allow recirculation of air, Heated air in the winter. It will free up space in the shop and be a little quieter. Any thoughts?

-- Larry

View pvwoodcrafts's profile

pvwoodcrafts

244 posts in 4895 days


#49 posted 03-28-2011 07:45 PM

Sounds like a winner to me. Thats something I always wanted to try. Might want to put a furnace filter on the return.Put your 2 stage collector outside your DC room though so its easier to get to to empty

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com [email protected]

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

552 posts in 4153 days


#50 posted 03-28-2011 07:57 PM

Mike and/or Judy – I haven’t had a problem with makeup air. My shop in in my basement. I’d say it’s 1500 sq/ft. I have an 1100 cfm (rated) DC that I run for 20 seconds to a minute at a time. I did do some work recently where I ran for 15 minutes at a shot. I cracked a window in the basement. I’m sure I’m drawing some heated air from upstairs and through little cracks but if you do a stink bug count you’ll see there are plenty of those to keep my shop from being air tight! To me the watse of heated or cooled air is less than the hassle of bags, canisters, fine dust particles, etc…

Cornflake – being a hobyist woodworker I have found little trace of dust outside my home. I mailnly have a planer, table saw and miter saw hooked up to the dust collector (through a chip separator). I pondered the water idea at one point but it’s not needed and probably just a big mess.

Larry – there are people on here who have built rooms/closets for their DCs. If I couldn’t have run outside I would have done that.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

1 2 3 4 next »
181 replies


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com