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View Harry's profile

What is this blade used for?

by Harry
posted 01-11-2016 03:12 AM


23 replies so far

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1077 posts in 2100 days


#1 posted 01-11-2016 03:15 AM

i believe its used for making big pieces of wood smaller. :)

dont think ive seen a grind like that on a blade before.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8239 posts in 3080 days


#2 posted 01-11-2016 03:23 AM

V-groove cutter – typically used for scoring and folding stock.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1780 days


#3 posted 01-11-2016 03:53 AM

I believe it’s more just for decorative v-grooving material. Typically folding cutters don’t have the flattened tip.

CBW though

View Harry's profile

Harry

80 posts in 2061 days


#4 posted 01-11-2016 03:54 AM



i believe its used for making big pieces of wood smaller. :)

- tomsteve

You gave me a good chuckle.

-- Harry - Professional amateur

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8239 posts in 3080 days


#5 posted 01-11-2016 04:03 AM

I believe it s more just for decorative v-grooving material. Typically folding cutters don t have the flattened tip.
- jbay

Some do, some don’t… depends on the application.
V-Groove Cutter with 1/32 inch Flat Tip

Can also be used for decorative trim cuts as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Harry's profile

Harry

80 posts in 2061 days


#6 posted 01-11-2016 04:10 AM


V-groove cutter – typically used for scoring and folding stock.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Cheers,
Brad

That makes sense Brad, It also came with a half dozen non-ferrous blades. The guy I bought the saw from (and a whole bunch of other tools) was an architect building a mega modern spec house with some materials I had never seen before.

-- Harry - Professional amateur

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 2334 days


#7 posted 01-11-2016 04:17 AM

That blade is too thick to be just used for scoring. The special cut and the rust suggests that its a wet cutter for solid surface cutting.

M

-- Madmark - [email protected] Wiretreefarm.com

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4812 posts in 4616 days


#8 posted 01-11-2016 04:31 AM

I’ve seen blades like that for machining thick sheets of plastic, for fabricating leak-proof joints in water tanks and fuel cells.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Harry's profile

Harry

80 posts in 2061 days


#9 posted 01-11-2016 04:38 AM



That blade is too thick to be just used for scoring. The special cut and the rust suggests that its a wet cutter for solid surface cutting.

M

- MadMark

EVERYTHING had rust on it that I bought :(

-- Harry - Professional amateur

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8239 posts in 3080 days


#10 posted 01-11-2016 04:41 AM

That blade is too thick to be just used for scoring. The special cut and the rust suggests that its a wet cutter for solid surface cutting.
- MadMark

Maybe… but if you follow the link I gave above, it shows an 8” blade almost identical, with the same 3/8” kerf width, specifically for the task mentioned. And it is described as “Carbide Tipped V-groover for scoring and folding applications” (and is way expensive!! :)

Rust just indicates it hasn’t been used for a long while. I’ve had TS blades that were as rusty or rustier still installed on the saw when purchased, and certainly not used in a wet environment. Nothing that a little evapo-rust or electrolysis won’t take care of though.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Harry's profile

Harry

80 posts in 2061 days


#11 posted 01-11-2016 05:04 AM

It’s going into my electrolysis bath tomorrow. Wow those blades are $$$

-- Harry - Professional amateur

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13503 posts in 3261 days


#12 posted 01-11-2016 05:22 AM



It s going into my electrolysis bath tomorrow. Wow those blades are $$$

- Harry

Is that safe for the brazing? It probably is, but I never hear of anyone using electrolysis on carbide TS blades. I’m asking because I don’t know.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Harry's profile

Harry

80 posts in 2061 days


#13 posted 01-11-2016 06:42 AM

Is that safe for the brazing? It probably is, but I never hear of anyone using electrolysis on carbide TS blades. I m asking because I don t know.

- Rick M.

Good point, I just searched around a bit and didnt find a good answer yet. Guess I’ll wait with the bath, not like I need to use this cutter tomorrow.

-- Harry - Professional amateur

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

26722 posts in 3565 days


#14 posted 01-11-2016 06:57 AM

I’d put it on the saw, raise it up, and run some pine through the saw, let the cut wipe the rust away..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8239 posts in 3080 days


#15 posted 01-11-2016 05:57 PM

Is that safe for the brazing? It probably is, but I never hear of anyone using electrolysis on carbide TS blades. I m asking because I don t know.
- Rick M.

I’ve done carbide tipped blades and it didn’t seem to have any adverse effects on them. Maybe if you used one as the sacrificial anode it might though. But if you don’t feel comfortable with the process, then just dunk it in some evapo-rust instead. Laid flat in a shallow container, you wouldn’t need much and you can re-use it over and over again on all the other smaller rusty stuff you have. I have an old gallon paint can about half filled with it, with a wire basket in it for dunking nuts, bolts, washers and other little items. I love the stuff, and it’s also a lot less messy :)

Hold on a bit, and I’m sure others will chime in about other methods as well (citric acid, molasses, etc…)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Harry's profile

Harry

80 posts in 2061 days


#16 posted 01-11-2016 06:34 PM

I’ve been wanting to try evapo-rust anyway, it can be a challange with electrolysis wiring small things like screws. I have a pretty good sized bath that has been going for months and just found a few missing parts on the bottom of the container with all the crud… Thanks for your input!

-- Harry - Professional amateur

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13503 posts in 3261 days


#17 posted 01-11-2016 09:17 PM

Electrolysis seems perfect for complex shapes with lots of crannies or if you do a lot of de-rusting but for occasional run of the mill de-rusting, manual methods are faster. I feel like I could have 90+% of the rust removed from that blade in under five minutes, less time than it would take me to find a container the right size to soak it. Or even better, send it out for sharpening and they will de-rust as part of the process.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

554 posts in 3879 days


#18 posted 01-11-2016 11:12 PM

Wow are those blades expensive.

I wonder why?

Greg

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1540 posts in 2834 days


#19 posted 01-11-2016 11:35 PM

I did the Evapo-Rust thing on the top of a scroll saw I bought on Craigs List. It was a mess. I did not want to dunk such a large piece in a tank, so I used the paper towel method. I placed a double layer of paper towels on the top and soaked it with the Evapo-Rust. The whole thing went into a plastic bag. Next day, I removed the towels, wiped off as much crud as I could and repeated the process. I did this three times. It didn’t take all that much of the Evapo-Rust to do it. Wrap your blade in paper towels, put it is a plastic bag and add some of the fluid.

Here’s a “tongue-in-cheek” before and after picture I put together to show some friends who doubted that this stuff works.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8239 posts in 3080 days


#20 posted 01-11-2016 11:49 PM

I did the Evapo-Rust thing on the top of a scroll saw I bought on Craigs List. It was a mess. I did not want to dunk such a large piece in a tank, so I used the paper towel method.
- Kazooman

While that method will certainly work, it’s less than ideal and takes a bit longer as you noted (plus it makes it almost impossible to re-use). You really need to submerge the part in the liquid for best results. Once the liquid bonds with the iron oxide, it needs to be replenished with fresh stuff to keep working, which is why they recommend fully immersing the part. However, for large flat parts, there is no need to use a tank… a shallow pan works just fine and almost anything can be used. For example, here is a jointer table soaking in evapo-rust:

That is the top of one of those rubber-maid storage containers. You can also use tape or other methods to create a dam on top of the flat portion, then pour in a thin layer of evapo-rust and let it do it’s thing:

For the saw blade in question, a small 12” diameter bowl (like a plastic Tupperware type) would work just fine. Don’t tell the wife what you are using it for though :)

Cheers,
Brad

PS: And don’t worry about ruining the bowl… Evapo-rust is water based and non-toxic… it will clean up just fine.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1540 posts in 2834 days


#21 posted 01-12-2016 12:07 AM


I did the Evapo-Rust thing on the top of a scroll saw I bought on Craigs List. It was a mess. I did not want to dunk such a large piece in a tank, so I used the paper towel method.
- Kazooman

While that method will certainly work, it s less than ideal and takes a bit longer as you noted (plus it makes it almost impossible to re-use). You really need to submerge the part in the liquid for best results. Once the liquid bonds with the iron oxide, it needs to be replenished with fresh stuff to keep working, which is why they recommend fully immersing the part. However, for large flat parts, there is no need to use a tank… a shallow pan works just fine and almost anything can be used. For example, here is a jointer table soaking in evapo-rust:

That is the top of one of those rubber-maid storage containers. You can also use tape or other methods to create a dam on top of the flat portion, then pour in a thin layer of evapo-rust and let it do it s thing:

For the saw blade in question, a small 12” diameter bowl (like a plastic Tupperware type) would work just fine. Don t tell the wife what you are using it for though :)

Cheers,
Brad

PS: And don t worry about ruining the bowl… Evapo-rust is water based and non-toxic… it will clean up just fine.

- MrUnix

Yep, it probably takes a bit longer. However, I have a lot of time now that the snow is flying and I did back when that process was done. No need to hurry a restoration. That rust came from sitting neglected for years. Three days to get it off was quick enough. Probably faster than electrolysis. The scroll saw in question was also missing the speed control electronics and I replaced them with NOS parts. Had to wait for them while I was removing the rust. Works like a charm. I ended up using less than half of the jug of material (small bottle, not the big jug). I really don’t need another thing like an Evapo-Rust bath to find a space for in my limited space.

If I were to be in a position where I was going to be doing a large number of pieces or anticipated doing several over the course of time I would make a bath. In my case a bath would have used more of the product and left me with a storage or disposal issue. Many would be put off by that prospect and they should know that the alternative works great for a one off project.

Not trying to be argumentative, just offering an alternative for those who might want it.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8239 posts in 3080 days


#22 posted 01-12-2016 12:45 AM

LOL – Ok… but here are a few more alternative thoughts :)

Three days to get it off was quick enough. Probably faster than electrolysis.

Obviously you haven’t done much electrolysis :) That SS table would have taken maybe a couple hours with a proper electrolysis setup (and probably about the same or just a hair longer if immersed in evapo-rust). I’ve had rusty nasty parts that were stripped clean in less than an hour w/electrolysis, and have never needed to keep something in for longer than overnight.

In my case a bath would have used more of the product and left me with a storage or disposal issue.

An 18×18 inch pan filled up with 1/2” of fluid would use about 19 ounces… or about 3 ounces more than you used – if you bought the quart bottle and only used half (and it could be re-used after you were done). I’m not sure storage would be that big of a problem as you can keep it in just about anything, and re-use it over and over again until it just stops working. And to dispose of it, you just pour it down the drain.

No argument though… it did what you wanted to and that is what is important! Just more info for those looking at doing something similar.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You can do the same shallow pan deal with electrolysis, so you don’t need a huge tank for it either.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Harry's profile

Harry

80 posts in 2061 days


#23 posted 01-12-2016 04:14 AM

Thanks for all the good info gentleman! I have a 40gal electrolysis bath set up that gets used just about every day. I went to buy a used Unisaw off Craigslist and ended up buying the guys whole workshop. Table saw, jointer, planer, shaper, drill press, band saw, panel saw, DC, air filtration unit and a bunch of other stuff. All had about a year of light use but was stored in a spec house that was not completed and left open to the elements. Surface rust on everything. I only have the shaper to restore. It was a really good deal but also a conciderable amount of work. I’m also using sandblasting with glass beads to clean up pieces that don’t affect tolerances on surfaces. Getting some Evapo-rust tomorrow to try out. Need to get some wood working in here soon!

-- Harry - Professional amateur

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