LumberJocks

All Replies on How Strong Of An Impact Driver Do I need?

  • Advertise with us
View wmgworks's profile

How Strong Of An Impact Driver Do I need?

by wmgworks
posted 10-07-2015 07:48 PM


49 replies so far

View Richard's profile

Richard

1944 posts in 3768 days


#1 posted 10-07-2015 07:59 PM

I have a 20 volt Dewalt that 1/4” drive that I love , It has much more power than any of my friends 12 volt units regardless of brand.

View ste6168's profile

ste6168

259 posts in 2249 days


#2 posted 10-07-2015 08:05 PM

I have the Milwaukee 12v, I love how light it is, and it is awesome for around the shop stuff, but if I were building a deck (or similar) and driving hundreds of screws, I would a longer lasting battery. Ive never had a lack of power, honestly.

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

196 posts in 2063 days


#3 posted 10-07-2015 08:08 PM

So if you had two drivers where the hp was the same but the voltage was different, the only difference would be how long the battery lasts?

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9019 posts in 3655 days


#4 posted 10-07-2015 08:09 PM

Milwaukee Fuel 18v will cover all that you need.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6973 posts in 3571 days


#5 posted 10-07-2015 08:12 PM

If you have other cordless tools, consider buying one that might use the same batteries. My only exposure to the cordless impacts was recently when I got to use a friend’s Bosch and Milwaukee (both 12V) side by side. The Milwaukee was a much quicker driving 6” screws through a 4×4 into the 2x deck of my trailer….the Bosch was no slotch, though. I’d be happy with either but if I lay down my own shekels, it will probably be the Milwaukee.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

6020 posts in 4321 days


#6 posted 10-07-2015 08:18 PM

I have a Bosch 12V impact driver and I can drive 1/4” lag bolts with it.

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

196 posts in 2063 days


#7 posted 10-07-2015 08:23 PM



If you have other cordless tools, consider buying one that might use the same batteries. My only exposure to the cordless impacts was recently when I got to use a friend s Bosch and Milwaukee (both 12V) side by side. The Milwaukee was a much quicker driving 6” screws through a 4×4 into the 2x deck of my trailer….the Bosch was no slotch, though. I d be happy with either but if I lay down my own shekels, it will probably be the Milwaukee.

- Fred Hargis

The only cordless thing I own is a 20+ year old Makita drill. I’m not brand loyal as of right now. Money is super tight right now, and I am starting out with almost nothing in the way of tools. I’m looking to buy mostly used to save some money, so I will have to jump on whatever is available. But I don’t want to end up buying something that isn’t powerful enough for what I will need it for. Hence the original question

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View ste6168's profile

ste6168

259 posts in 2249 days


#8 posted 10-07-2015 08:26 PM



So if you had two drivers where the hp was the same but the voltage was different, the only difference would be how long the battery lasts?

- wmgworks

I can’t answer that, but I know if I drop my 12v into “low” gear, its got way more torque than I could ever see myself needing. That battery doesn’t last forever. Luckily, I have both the impact driver, and drill, 4 batteries, and 2 chargers. I am always ready!

View frosty50's profile

frosty50

46 posts in 3425 days


#9 posted 10-07-2015 08:43 PM

I have the Milwaukee 12V and 18V Makita, depending on what I am doing determines which I use. The majority of the time it is the 12V Milwaukee. Light weight, easy to fit in tighter spaces and plenty of power. Recommend at least one extra battery on the 12V, they recharge within an hour. Same for the Makita. When putting up a ledger for my deck, I use both and had no problems with either tool. Same when I did my fence. I use the Milwaukee in my shop all the time due to its size and portability, and it has handle every task without problems. I use it more than the drill driver that came in the set. Great for putting face frames together. I especially like the battery indicator on the side of the impact. When only one of the four lights is lite, I know immediately to change the battery. I always have a least one extra fully charged battery ready to go. I got the Milwaukee set on sale at the big orange store for $99, and it came with the drill/driver, impact, charger and 2 batteries. I purchase a set of 2 extra batteries when they went on sale for $69 or $79. I like spares batteries incase one in the charger is now fully charge, I always have a spare that is. I do this for the Makita also. I do not like the Bosch, I have had problems with them. My maintenance staff all have 18V DeWalt and they get a work out.

-- frosty

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

196 posts in 2063 days


#10 posted 10-07-2015 08:54 PM



I have the Milwaukee 12V and 18V Makita, depending on what I am doing determines which I use. The majority of the time it is the 12V Milwaukee. Light weight, easy to fit in tighter spaces and plenty of power. Recommend at least one extra battery on the 12V, they recharge within an hour. Same for the Makita. When putting up a ledger for my deck, I use both and had no problems with either tool. Same when I did my fence. I use the Milwaukee in my shop all the time due to its size and portability, and it has handle every task without problems. I use it more than the drill driver that came in the set. Great for putting face frames together. I especially like the battery indicator on the side of the impact. When only one of the four lights is lite, I know immediately to change the battery. I always have a least one extra fully charged battery ready to go. I got the Milwaukee set on sale at the big orange store for $99, and it came with the drill/driver, impact, charger and 2 batteries. I purchase a set of 2 extra batteries when they went on sale for $69 or $79. I like spares batteries incase one in the charger is now fully charge, I always have a spare that is. I do this for the Makita also. I do not like the Bosch, I have had problems with them. My maintenance staff all have 18V DeWalt and they get a work out.

- frosty50

Frosty50, that was a perfect example and explanation! I won’t be doing much construction – mostly woodworking projects. And I agree about having extra batteries around. It sounds like a 12v unit would work perfect for me. Thanks!

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View JayT's profile

JayT

6424 posts in 3289 days


#11 posted 10-07-2015 09:12 PM



So if you had two drivers where the hp was the same but the voltage was different, the only difference would be how long the battery lasts?

- wmgworks

Yes, if the torque ratings are the same, then the only difference is run time.

I have a first generation M12 impact and it does everything I’ve asked of it. I’ve driven everything from 3/4in wood screws up to 3/8 lags with no issues (predrilled holes, of course). For woodworking and light construction you don’t need anything more than one of the quality 12V offerings that are out there.

When we remodeled our kitchen a few years ago, I got to talking with the installer about tools. He was using 12V drill and impact driver at that time and really liked them. Was far happier with them because of size and weight than his previous 18V tools.

With any cordless tool, having that extra battery is a good thing and the 12V batteries charge faster than I can run them down during normal use, so you don’t have to have a bunch of extras.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

450 posts in 2164 days


#12 posted 10-07-2015 10:13 PM

IMHO, if you get an 18V, you’ll be set and not run short. We used the Makita to build a deck out of Ipe, and it was still young when we finished. If you get a 12V, you may end up having to buy a bigger one down the road. If you can wait until the holiday sales start (perhaps borrow one in the meantime?) you can probably get this Ryobi set $99.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

386 posts in 2747 days


#13 posted 10-07-2015 10:27 PM

If you are limited in your budget I would get the Milwaukee M18 Fuel impact driver. It will be able to handle anything you can throw at it and is still small enough to get into tight places. If you think you could add an additional tool later on then I would get an M12 Fuel impact driver for now and add the M18 if you run into things the M12 wont handle. The new M12 Fuel brushless tools are as powerful as some brands 18v offerings. The M12 Fuels can easily handle about 95% of anything you will encounter and are the best bang for your buck currently available.

-- Earl

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3466 posts in 2875 days


#14 posted 10-07-2015 10:39 PM

i have a 20v Max driver for working on the deck, etc, but I like to use my 12v (Bosch) for fine work. It can drive in anything I need it to and I can control the screw much more precisely.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View jonah's profile

jonah

2136 posts in 4376 days


#15 posted 10-07-2015 11:37 PM

If you can wait a month or so, the 12V combo kits with a drill and impact driver are nearly always on sale for the holidays. The Milwaukee kit was a bit above $100 last year, and the Bosch 12V kit was $100 IIRC. Either would service you just fine.

The best combo of hand held power tools, IMO, is 12V cordless tools and corded drills/impact drivers for when you need tons of power. I wish I’d bought the Milwaukee 12V kit instead of my Ridgid 18V kit, honestly. And I like my Ridgid stuff, its just much bigger and heavier than the 12V tools.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2839 posts in 3374 days


#16 posted 10-07-2015 11:43 PM

I have both the 12 volt Dewalt and the 20 volt Dewalt. If you want to drive deck screws all day get the 20 volt. If you want to work on cabinetry and small projects and such get the 12 – it’s lighter and fits into tighter spaces and has all the power you will need.

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

196 posts in 2063 days


#17 posted 10-07-2015 11:48 PM

Great advice, everyone. Thank you so much!

ForestGrl, jonah: Waiting is probably a wise idea. I’ve lived without one this long. Just hard to be patient sometimes when you want to just get it done

Thanks again everyone

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2881 posts in 4000 days


#18 posted 10-08-2015 12:03 AM

I have a 9.4VOlt Makita impact that will break off 3/8” bolts! Plenty enough!

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

View crank49's profile

crank49

4032 posts in 4049 days


#19 posted 10-08-2015 12:25 AM

I have the 18V Milwaukee 1/4” impact driver.
It’ll eat 3/8” lag bolts. In fact, if the bolt won’t turn it’ll twist the head right off.
If I ever get another one, it’ll be a smaller more compact unit.
You absolutely want Lithium batteries, regardless of the voltage.
For small work, you might just be better off with a drill/driver where you can set the clutch to release before running a screw completely through you work piece.
I install solar panels all the time and the special bolts they are installed with have to be tightened to a specefic torque. Can’t do that with an impact driver.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20802 posts in 4754 days


#20 posted 10-08-2015 01:00 AM

With a Rigid drill set you can get a lifetime battery warranty. That is the tripping point of cordless, battery replacement cost after a few years. I wore a lot of them out ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View jonah's profile

jonah

2136 posts in 4376 days


#21 posted 10-08-2015 12:08 PM



With a Rigid drill set you can get a lifetime battery warranty. That is the tripping point of cordless, battery replacement cost after a few years. I wore a lot of them out ;-)

- TopamaxSurvivor


If Ridgid would upgrade their 12V tools to be more competitive with the Bosch and Milwaukee offerings, I’d be the first in line to buy them. Sadly, the current tools, by all accounts, do not measure up from either a power or battery-life standpoint.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

807 posts in 3477 days


#22 posted 10-08-2015 02:16 PM

The 12 V will probably do most of everything you will want to do including twisting off some screws.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3466 posts in 2875 days


#23 posted 10-08-2015 02:35 PM

I mentioned control as to why I preferred a 12v for furniture work, but the size, as someone else noted, is also a big plus. I’ve under mine many times in places I couldn’t use a larger unit.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

495 posts in 3648 days


#24 posted 10-08-2015 03:33 PM

I have a 14.4 Makita that I’ve had for around 5 years – I’ve never needed more power than it can supply. Impact drivers work differently than drills, so you get a TON more torque out of an impact driver than a drill of the same voltage. If you’re doing a project (like a deck) where you’re using it all day, I think the size & weight is going to be more of a factor than power.

My opinion – you’ll be better off with a lower voltage driver from a good brand – Makita, Milwaukee, Dewalt, etc, than a higher voltage from a cheaper brand. Not trying to knock Ryobi, but I’ll use them as an example – it’s more of value line tool. The “guts” inside aren’t going to be as durable.

All that said, you will not regret getting an impact driver – it’s my go to tool.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1478 posts in 2302 days


#25 posted 10-08-2015 03:53 PM

I’ve used Ryobi, Makita and Milwaukee.

The 18v drill/driver set I got was good and comfortable for me. I liked they were a little smaller than the others but the driver had the bit shank go out on me within a month and then the drill had the clutch start freely spinning the next month.

I checked reviews and the Milwaukee 18v Fuel was mostly rated at the top. I’ve had no problems with any of them and I really liked the 3 speed options for the impact driver. Also, the drill actually had a very good impact setting that let me do some brick drilling effectively.

I recently bought the 12v for some of the things I was doing where I didn’t have enough room, and also needed to back off the power a bit. I have not had enough experience with those to be able to comment on them yet.

As for the Ryobi, I never had a problem with it. I have the old blue 18v driver that came out when I was still using the NiCad batteries. It was my favorite tool, along with the right angle drill. If the lithium batteries wouldn’t crap out so often, I would still be using them but the cost to run them got ridiculous after replacing batteries every so often.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4615 posts in 4820 days


#26 posted 10-08-2015 04:25 PM

The 12V is plenty – - even for driving 5 inch deck screws.

My oldest working on his Eagle Project in July (sister pitching in too)

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View Robert's profile

Robert

4553 posts in 2558 days


#27 posted 10-08-2015 04:39 PM



I have a Bosch 12V impact driver and I can drive 1/4” lag bolts with it.

- MrRon

Dittos. Like the lightweight. Battery life not that great, IMO.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20802 posts in 4754 days


#28 posted 10-08-2015 05:37 PM


With a Rigid drill set you can get a lifetime battery warranty. That is the tripping point of cordless, battery replacement cost after a few years. I wore a lot of them out ;-)

- TopamaxSurvivor

If Ridgid would upgrade their 12V tools to be more competitive with the Bosch and Milwaukee offerings, I d be the first in line to buy them. Sadly, the current tools, by all accounts, do not measure up from either a power or battery-life standpoint.

- jonah

I thought the same thing when my 14 v batteries gave out before the lifetime battery warranty. I found their 18v drill and driver are so light and handy, why even bother with 12 v?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View jonah's profile

jonah

2136 posts in 4376 days


#29 posted 10-08-2015 06:57 PM

I don’t find the Ridgid 18V stuff to be particularly light or handy. Especially compared to the 12V systems I’ve looked at. The Bosch drill and impact driver are especially compact and handy. I wish they’d offer their brushless tools in the US as a kit. I’d buy that in a second.

View GregD's profile

GregD

788 posts in 4214 days


#30 posted 10-08-2015 07:35 PM



Milwaukee Fuel 18v will cover all that you need.

- waho6o9

+1

I have avoided cordless tools for years (decades?) but I decided to treat myself to a top-of-the-line impact driver and hammer drill set.

I have no experience with other brands, but I really like my Milwaukee Fuel 18v impact driver. I got a kit with both tools, 2 batteries, and a charger. The batteries have an LED display that indicates the level of charge. They also recharge quickly. The driver has 3 torque settings, so it works well for screws that need a gentle touch as well as for screws that need to be driven hard.

I’ve added the LED floodlight and the Hackzall. Definitely a splurge, but I really enjoy using these tools.

-- Greg D.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4615 posts in 4820 days


#31 posted 10-08-2015 07:37 PM

Definitely rule out Nicad batteries…

Lithium should be the ONLY battery pack under consideration.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View Paul Mayer's profile

Paul Mayer

1154 posts in 4143 days


#32 posted 10-08-2015 08:34 PM

I framed a large basement using a 12V Dewalt impact driver. It was perfect. Drove 3 and 4 inch screws with no problem. I’ve built a couple decks with the same tool, and it was fine power-wise, but it required lots of battery charging. I absolutely love the lightweight compact nature of this tool. If I were building a lot of decks, or even just one or two more, I would absolutely want a larger one. But for anything in the shop, framing occasional walls, or any typical ad-hoc DYI project that requires driving screws, I love this tool.

-- Paul Mayer, http://youtube.com/c/toolmetrix

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

196 posts in 2063 days


#33 posted 10-08-2015 09:00 PM

Thanks, again, everyone for your thoughts. I’m pretty convinced all I will need is a 12v with maybe 2 batteries. All of my work will be in the workshop. I live in a townhouse so I won’t be building a deck or framing anything. Biggest stuff will be cabinets and other items maybe.

I’ve been keeping my eye on eBay since I started this thread, and will also maybe wait until the seasonal sales to see if something good comes along. I’d love to get my hands on a Milwaukee if the deal is right.

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1029 posts in 2653 days


#34 posted 10-08-2015 09:08 PM

I like the 18V tools. stay away from the ryobi.The tool is fine but out of 5 batteries all new,1 works the rest won’t charge new out of the box!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20802 posts in 4754 days


#35 posted 10-08-2015 09:40 PM

I would be very concerned about the condition of the batteries if it is used off ebay.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1478 posts in 2302 days


#36 posted 10-08-2015 09:48 PM



Thanks, again, everyone for your thoughts. I m pretty convinced all I will need is a 12v with maybe 2 batteries. All of my work will be in the workshop. I live in a townhouse so I won t be building a deck or framing anything. Biggest stuff will be cabinets and other items maybe.

I ve been keeping my eye on eBay since I started this thread, and will also maybe wait until the seasonal sales to see if something good comes along. I d love to get my hands on a Milwaukee if the deal is right.

- wmgworks

Home Depot usually has Milwaukee specials where if you get a drill/driver set, you can get a free battery, bluetooth speaker, right angle drill or light. I think it’s going on right now actually.
The set comes with 2 batteries so you can skip that but I love right angle drills. Really helps when you’re working on drawer slides and other things inside carcasses.

When I got the 18V Fuel, I got a free sawzall, that made the purchase a no brainer.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4553 posts in 2558 days


#37 posted 10-09-2015 11:04 AM

+1 on previous poster advice.

I wouldn’t buy from Ebay tools like this best bought from brick and mortar store.

Look for sales like he said.

Go try some out.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View daniel1412's profile

daniel1412

1 post in 837 days


#38 posted 01-23-2019 03:50 AM

I only want to give an advice on how to use the impact driver after. Clearly you have the intend to do some bigger projects and I think you should consider it carefully, so that you don’t have to repurchase another piece of equipment. I think the 12V model would be enough for you by now if your work scale is not big. And considering your budget, there will be lots of models that work well, though I can’t be sure about them in long term use.
Useful information https://www.toolforhome.com/best-impact-driver-reviews/

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3856 posts in 4515 days


#39 posted 01-23-2019 04:06 AM

My bosch 18v has been used in construction. I’ve driven 8” deck lags with it. The new 20v ones look nice though.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View shawnn's profile

shawnn

154 posts in 2443 days


#40 posted 01-23-2019 08:22 AM

IMO if you’re primarily doing woodworking rather than construction and are limited on funds get a good quality drill + spare battery rather than a set with both drill and impact driver. I have the Dewalt 20v set and find that the drill is much more versatile, it drives screws with more control and far longer battery life than the impact – in addition to drilling. It also has the torque settings to prevent stripping unlike the impact. It will drive 3-4 inch screws with no problem. My use is probably 98% drill and 2% impact regardless of what I’m working on.

View Steve_O's profile

Steve_O

31 posts in 1145 days


#41 posted 01-23-2019 05:45 PM

I have the 20V Dewalt in 3 sizes.
DCF885 1/4”
DCF894 1/2”
DCF899 1/2”
Also have the new milwaukee Stubby 2554-20

I have used the 885 to hell and back over around 5 yrs , maybe more.
It is great. Will drive 4” lag screws into PT and/or break them.

I got the new Stubby Milwaukee and at around 250 Ft/lbs it’s about twice as powerful as the DCF885 .
Plus you can get in VERY tight spots to do automotive or other work. You can buy a little quick change adapter to fit 1/4” hex bits . Plus the milwaukee has 3 torque levels, which is nice for reassembly or not breaking things.

The DCF894 has 450 Ft/lbs so you could also do Large bolts, lug nuts while still being able to put on a quick change adapter to use 1/4” hex bits for deck screws, etc .

Remember, you will almost NEVER regret spending 75 bucks more on a better, more versatile tool. I’d say get the Milwaukee stubby 2554 , get it in 3/8 and get an adapter for quick change 1/4” hex bits. Then you’ve got everything covered. Can do all wood jobs, deck screws, auto and anything you’d use 3/8 sockets for.
The batteries last a long time too .

-- Build things in wood and metal...when i'm not at my day job

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

14359 posts in 5175 days


#42 posted 01-23-2019 05:55 PM

I have Milwaukee drivers and highly recommend them. I would suggest an 18v system for construction type work. 12v for normal household stuff. What ever you choose try to stick with the same battery system so that you can add bare tools as you need them.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

4112 posts in 2935 days


#43 posted 01-23-2019 06:00 PM

Op since his thread is 4 years d what did you buy?

View Steve_O's profile

Steve_O

31 posts in 1145 days


#44 posted 01-23-2019 07:42 PM



Op since his thread is 4 years d what did you buy?

- diverlloyd


haha …yeah I just noticed that !

-- Build things in wood and metal...when i'm not at my day job

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

861 posts in 3928 days


#45 posted 01-23-2019 08:04 PM

I have and love the PC 20V system (two Drill motors and an impact driver. I can’t imagine a woodworker needing anything more powerful. It’s so strong I have twisted off the heads of many a 1/2” Lag screw with it.

-- Ken

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

6020 posts in 4321 days


#46 posted 01-23-2019 10:26 PM

I would buy the same brand and voltage of other cordless tools you now own. I have a Bosch 12V for light duty work and I can use my son’s 18V Dewalt for heavy jobs.

View northy185's profile

northy185

13 posts in 878 days


#47 posted 01-24-2019 12:00 AM

I had an 18v Ridgid setup (drill and driver) that served me well for years. The batteries started to let go, and through work I was able to get some 18v Milwaukee tools. The improvement is amazing; I sold my corded drill because my cordless was more powerful!

If power is a concern, stick to 18v (or 20v), whatever you can find used that doesn’t feel like junk in the hand. A replacement battery will do wonders for the power of the tool; the higher amp/hour batteries are able to run cooler and for a longer time.

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

541 posts in 1551 days


#48 posted 01-24-2019 03:47 AM

I know i’m jumping in late, but i’ll share my 2 cents. I work for a farm machinery company putting on cabs on tractors; we use (and abuse (: ) impacts daily. Before I went to work there, I was (and still am) a huge Makita fan. My opinion was if it wasn’t Makita it wasn’t worth buying.

My perspective and opinion have changed, however. Nearly every brand of impact has been used in this shop: Makita, Milwaukee, Craftsman, Porter-Cable, Dewalt, Ridgid, etc. I have to say though that the Milwaukee is by FAR the best impact on the market. It hits the hardest and is excellent quality- it rivals the Snap-On 3/8 air impacts in the shop. If I had to buy another impact set, it would, without a doubt, be Milwaukee, and that is coming from a big Makita fan.

My recommendation for a good quality, low cost impact though would have to go to Porter-Cable. They are a good impact for what they cost, and they do the job well.

Hope this helps!

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

6020 posts in 4321 days


#49 posted 01-24-2019 09:07 PM

I’ve driven 3” long 1/4” lags with my Bosch 12V impact driver with no problem.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com