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View cornelsteyn1's profile

Help with raked and splayed legs for coffee table

by cornelsteyn1
posted 07-03-2015 02:44 PM


23 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2399 days


#1 posted 07-03-2015 03:10 PM

Hi, a picture or two would help me and others advise you.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#2 posted 07-03-2015 04:01 PM

Hi mrjinx, i’ve added some renderings like you requested, thanks!

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2399 days


#3 posted 07-03-2015 04:13 PM

I think with the legs at an angle, you would have to have something to prevent them from spreading apart. I can think of metal legs welded to “runners”. Or rectangular steel tubing cut at an angle and welded to a plate. You could make the design more sturdy by making the wooden legs straight instead of angled and use ornamental braces to make the legs sturdy.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2399 days


#4 posted 07-03-2015 04:16 PM

Not sure if that picture uploaded. Here

-- earthartandfoods.com

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

960 posts in 2073 days


#5 posted 07-03-2015 04:16 PM

Wedged through tenons?

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 2992 days


#6 posted 07-03-2015 04:21 PM

That kind of arrangement often employs metal brackets, screwed to the underside of the top. When for a chair, the legs are attached with wedged through tenons.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

1170 posts in 3162 days


#7 posted 07-03-2015 04:24 PM

I’d be a bit concerned about long-term stability with the minimalist approach. But you won’t know unless you try…

About the only way to do it that minimalisticaly is to use a non-through mortise/tenon joint. And for extra strength, use a foxtail wedged M/T. (That is, a non-through wedged M/T).

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#8 posted 07-03-2015 04:26 PM

mrjinx, good looking entry table nice inlay! Ornamental braces won’t really work with the look I’m hoping for.

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#9 posted 07-03-2015 04:27 PM

Clint, any links or pictures of the type of brackets you’re referring to?

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2399 days


#10 posted 07-03-2015 04:38 PM

Looks like this except rectangular.# May have to have a fabrication shop make them for you.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#11 posted 07-03-2015 04:38 PM

Thanks Mark, those are good points to consider.

My head knows and tells me that the best way would be the way my heart doesn’t want go, aprons and maybe stretchers, but I guess that’s the problem with seeing designs and wanting to imitate!

The top is only a smidgen over 3/4” (well 20mm not 19mm) thick with a 1 1/8” edge to make it look a bit thicker, do you think foxtail wedged tenons would work with a thin top like that?

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

960 posts in 2073 days


#12 posted 07-03-2015 04:40 PM



Clint, any links or pictures of the type of brackets you re referring to?

- cornelsteyn1

I think he’s referring to these (attached with hanger bolt in the end of the leg):

leg brackets

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#13 posted 07-03-2015 04:48 PM

jerryminer, I might be wrong but those look like they’re for turned legs? My legs are 3/4” thick and tapered 1 3/4” at the top to 3/4” at the bottom.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

960 posts in 2073 days


#14 posted 07-03-2015 05:06 PM

your legs are 3/4×1 3/4 at the top, and 3/4×3/4 at the bottom?

Sounds weak, but could possibly work for a coffee table. I still think wedged through tenons are your best option if you’re committed to that leg design.
Have you considered hair-pin metal legs?

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

801 posts in 3030 days


#15 posted 07-03-2015 05:11 PM

Been right where you are at before. Generally, I have found that using aprons (3-5 in wide) and cut the ends with a 5,6,or 7 degree miter is among the best and easiest solution. Attach the aprons to the legs by using mortise and tenon joints or use pocket screws. Because the angles are relatively small you don’t have to use compound miter cuts. Below is a maple table using pinned mortise and tenon joints. These aprons were cut at 7 degrees. Hope this helps you out. Send me a message if you would like additional information.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

801 posts in 3030 days


#16 posted 07-03-2015 05:12 PM

Sorry for the multiple entries. Website is not working well

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

801 posts in 3030 days


#17 posted 07-03-2015 05:17 PM

Sorry for the multiple entries. Website is not working well.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#18 posted 07-03-2015 05:20 PM

That’s right jerryminer, those are my leg dimensions. I’m not committed to anything yet, except for the table top, haha!

I could always go for thicker laminate the 3/4” stock and make them twice as thick. Maybe i shouldn’t be so stubborn and opt for through tenons. Was hoping that someone knows of a way they have used which worked.

I’m making more tops at the moment, so am not in a real rush to get the legs done.

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

460 posts in 1764 days


#19 posted 07-03-2015 06:18 PM

I think the legs have too much splay to them. 3/4” thick seems too thin, I would laminate them to 1 1/2” thick.
I have 2 methods I could suggest.
1- Furniture dowel and lots of glue. Although 3/4 isn’t much meat to screw into, I would add a 1/2” thick pc to the underside so that you have 1 1/4 to screw into, and make your build up 1 1/4” instead of 1 1/8”
2- Get a steel plate about 4” square, lag bolt it down to the top of your leg, then screw it to the bottom of your table.
I think the overall design is a little weak for strength but if nobody is dancing on it I think would work.

-- -

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#20 posted 07-03-2015 08:42 PM

I guess a little less “elegant” but should last a lifetime or two right? I guess the stock will be laminated for thicker legs that I will taper with 90 degree aprons along the length and slightly angled aprons along the width to make the legs rake a little.

Thank you for everyone’s input so far, I appreciate it, I’ll definitely ask fellow LJ’s for advice again, I’m amazed at how quickly you guys replied!

Woodust, I like your 2nd option, I might just use that in a future project!

Will post pictures when I’m done!

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

801 posts in 3030 days


#21 posted 07-04-2015 03:18 PM

Cornell -
Got your message. The legs are tapered only to the bottom of the aprons. On the tops, I have brought them down to flush by hand after assembly or by measuring the angle (after dry assembly) and cutting the top of the legs by mounting them in a miter groove on a miter saw.

Below are some examples of some tavern tables I have done which may better illustrate how these are made and a stool using some leg ideas that may work on the design you are considering. Note that the stool legs are 3/4” stock with round tenons made with a round tenon cutter mounted in a drill press. Cut the tenons first then cut them at the angle and taper using your design.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View JimF's profile

JimF

144 posts in 3924 days


#22 posted 07-04-2015 03:47 PM

Chris Schwarz has done a series on his blog at Lost Art Press on stake leg chairs and tables. I recommend looking through his posts to see if they will be of help. Your renderings look a lot like some of his work.

-- Insert clever tag line here

View cornelsteyn1's profile

cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 1985 days


#23 posted 09-12-2015 06:52 AM

Sorry for the massive delay, but after a busted planer, trying to fix it and ending up replacing it and other jobs that needed attention, I finally got the coffee tables done!

Thank you to everyone for their comments, help and suggestions.

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