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View PhillipRCW's profile

Is the Domino worth it

by PhillipRCW
posted 04-07-2015 05:35 PM


30 replies so far

View Rob's profile

Rob

704 posts in 4042 days


#1 posted 04-07-2015 05:49 PM

I imagine if you run a production shop it will pay for itself eventually in terms of saved time, but if woodworking is your hobby you might never recoup the cost. In that case, do you think it would simplify or speed up the types of projects that you work on? If so, is that worth $880 or $1375 to you, or is there something else in that price range that would benefit you more?

-- Ask an expert or be the expert - http://woodworking.stackexchange.com

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

6735 posts in 3464 days


#2 posted 04-07-2015 05:55 PM

I’m with Rob…if you do this for income then it’s worth every penny. But for hobbyists? I’ll have to find a used one, I’m not paying that for a new one. So far the 3 or 4 used ones I’ve seen for sale were almost as expensive as a new one.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View PhillipRCW's profile

PhillipRCW

517 posts in 2236 days


#3 posted 04-07-2015 06:44 PM

I am doing it as a small business right now, so I would definitely recoup the cost. I just haven’t seen anything like it so I wasn’t sure if there was an alternative. I know the domino and a biscuit joiner is like apples vs oranges. It would speed up and also strengthen a lot of the smaller joints, and I’ve heard that it does really well on table top glue ups.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6951 posts in 2692 days


#4 posted 04-07-2015 06:55 PM

I think if you’re relying such technology to strengthen table top glue ups it would be better to rethink the apron used beneath bearing the weight as opposed to using loose tenons between the boards comprising the top.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View PhillipRCW's profile

PhillipRCW

517 posts in 2236 days


#5 posted 04-07-2015 07:02 PM



I think if you re relying such technology to strengthen table top glue ups it would be better to rethink the apron used beneath bearing the weight as opposed to using loose tenons between the boards comprising the top.

- bigblockyeti

I typically don’t use anything but glue to do the table top. I’ve just seen a few blogs and builds showing it used on more of the simplistic styles. Like a reclaimed wood top with hair pin legs. I can see the “need” there I guess, but if I do the glue up right then I would hope I wouldn’t even need it then.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

View PhillipRCW's profile

PhillipRCW

517 posts in 2236 days


#6 posted 04-07-2015 07:06 PM

I really like a lot of the mid century modern pieces too. I’ve seen it used a lot more there to make the narrow joints a lot stronger.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1588 posts in 4038 days


#7 posted 04-07-2015 08:13 PM

I Bought it when it first came out. I was doing a hutch and had done a lot of floating tenon, so thought it would be great. I priced the tool into the piece, and got the DC and tool and saved a bit.

It does everything it’s advertised to do. The integrated DC in festool is topnotch. I made a lot of pieces, and all came out great.

I only sold it when I had a need for large M&T and it did not meed that requirement. I bit the bulled and bought the floor model Powermatic Mortise machine with tilting table and sold the domino to help offset most of the cost.

I love the big machine, but there are times I wish I’d hung onto the domino. I sold it for close to what I paid for it. Another great feature of Festool, if you do sell they go quick and don’t go down in value.

Still miss that little jewel.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

490 posts in 2652 days


#8 posted 04-07-2015 08:24 PM

There is some overlap between the domino and biscuits but there are some differences as well. Biscuits don’t make good alternatives to mortise and tenons where dominos do. It probably is closer to dowels in comparison but it’s a lot faster to setup and use. I don’t own one but i did borrow one for a project I was working on and it worked really well. It’s fast and easy to use which as others have said is key for production work. I can’t think of a faster way to make loose mortise and tenons honestly. If I was making pieces for resale I would own one no questions asked. As a hobbyist it’s a harder call to make.

View finns's profile

finns

171 posts in 4088 days


#9 posted 04-07-2015 08:33 PM

I’ve owned one for a few years now and use it for production work. I appreciate its accuracy for alignment as well as the reliability. If you can get over the price I’d be willing to bet that you’ll put it to good use.

View Richard's profile

Richard

1944 posts in 3662 days


#10 posted 04-07-2015 08:36 PM

Like most others here I would say that Time is Money so in a Production Shop doing a Lot of loose tenons then yes , but for a one time use or very few times in a year I would think a bench top or floor model Mortise machine would be a better bet.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

894 posts in 2930 days


#11 posted 04-07-2015 08:47 PM

As a hobbyist, I have to say it is not about the money. I just bought one b/c it will change the way I design a project. I can rely on joinery with the domino in different situations where I might have had to use pocket screws or mortise and tenon.

There seem to be so many fun ways to use this and from the video it appeared to be error free. It is. Dead on accuracy and repeatability. I bought it with the accessories to make spacing and repeating smaller domino project quickly.

Love it.

Festool is overpriced, no way to argue around that. Compared to a jointer for the same money or a decent table saw…? Seriously, it is expensive. But you will appreciate every penny of it know it is the quality we wish a similarly price tools had.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View endgrainy's profile

endgrainy

251 posts in 2859 days


#12 posted 04-07-2015 09:04 PM

I recently asked a similar question about the Domino XL: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/89146

The answer so far for me is yes, the Domino is worth it. Out of the box it is intuitive and dead-on accurate. I’ve only practiced with it so far, but I have a few projects upcoming with a combined total of >100 mortise and tenon joints.

Even though I am a hobbyist, the time saved with the domino vs traditional mortise and tenons should allow me to build one or two more projects this year. For me, that’s what it’s all about right now.

-- Follow me on Instagram @endgrainy

View PhillipRCW's profile

PhillipRCW

517 posts in 2236 days


#13 posted 04-07-2015 09:04 PM

I do custom pieces and honestly I am focused on a market that buys higher priced items (not that we all aren’t) so I think the design options the domino opens up would definitely help me in this market. Smaller, tighter joints. I just wanted to check here to make sure I’m not just thinking this in my head. I may not use it every day since I won’t be building the same item twice, but I could definitely see using it on a majority of the designs I have drawn up.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

894 posts in 2930 days


#14 posted 04-08-2015 05:13 AM

Phillip

Sounds like you need to call Bob M and get that ordered! Good luck. You will be glad you did.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3124 posts in 2996 days


#15 posted 04-08-2015 06:15 AM

I’d really like one, but I’m waiting for the Harbor Freight clone to come out at $79.95 (not counting the 20% coupon).

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Putttn's profile

Putttn

136 posts in 3249 days


#16 posted 04-08-2015 12:41 PM

I had one and I’m not a production shop, just for hobby. I sold it. I never seemed to be able to get it referenced correctly which became a source of frustration. It was a early model and I later heard some folks had the same issue. I ended up with a Jessem 8350 which I love and wouldn’t trade straight across for the Domino. At the price compared to what I can accomplish with the Jessem it’s a no brainer. Save your money and get the items you most need because there really isn’t all that much difference in strength of joints. I guess if you were a commercial shop and produced fine furniture it might be a consideration.

-- Bill eastern Washington Home of beloved ZAGS

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 2202 days


#17 posted 04-08-2015 01:00 PM

Ok, ill start by saying I havent used this tool and dont have a dog in the hunt for or against it. If your money is coming via cabinets then the best way you can manufacture faceframes with speed and stability is to buy a good pocket hole cutter. I used the PC 552. No longer in production but a very good tool if you can get a used one. if this is just furniture then the Domino may be the tool for you.

I write this based on the assumption that there is not many ways you can knock out faceframes faster than pocket holes and not as a suggestion against the Domino. You can use a double dowell boring machine and pin the dowells with 5/8 brads with glue but that still isnt as fast as pocket holes.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View TimberMagic's profile

TimberMagic

114 posts in 2150 days


#18 posted 04-08-2015 02:28 PM

I just received my Domino. That first project is going to be really expensive—$925. But everything else I build will cost me nothing for the use of the Domino …

-- Lee

View Julian's profile

Julian

1617 posts in 3662 days


#19 posted 04-08-2015 02:46 PM

I don’t own a domino machine but have been tempted to get one. Whenever I stop into a WoodCraft store I can hear it calling me. Talking to the store owner, he mentioned most of his buyers for the domino are hobbyist. This surprised me because of the price. Definitely a very useful tool but too pricey for me as a hobbyist.

-- Julian

View PhillipRCW's profile

PhillipRCW

517 posts in 2236 days


#20 posted 04-08-2015 03:06 PM

I won’t be doing a ton of cabinets, and I have a pocket hole set up if I do make them. I do like the idea of that PC 552 though. I do more dining and coffee tables, and benches. Waterfall edges would be a lot easier with it. I’d almost make my money back off of four benches if I did it right. I’m just a cheap skate and wanted to see if it for sure the real deal or not.

-- Phillip- Measure twice, cut onc.... Hey look, it's rustic.

View descolada's profile

descolada

54 posts in 2769 days


#21 posted 04-08-2015 07:56 PM

I bought a domino a year or so ago to do most of the joinery on my dining chairs and it was great for that job. The repeatability was hugely valuable and I got nice strong joints out of it.

After I finished the chairs built a waterfall edge coffee table and, for that, it’s just about the perfect tool for that job. Definitely could not have used a mortiser on any piece of that project and chopping out angled mortises or building an angled router guide would have been a bear. With the domino it was a breeze.

—Jesse

View dawsonbob's profile (online now)

dawsonbob

3914 posts in 2726 days


#22 posted 04-08-2015 08:05 PM



I d really like one, but I m waiting for the Harbor Freight clone to come out at $79.95 (not counting the 20% coupon).

- runswithscissors

I’m with runswithscissors on this one.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

594 posts in 2517 days


#23 posted 04-08-2015 09:16 PM

I’m of the opinion when it comes to Festool that if you’re a professional then buy green and only green when you have that option. If you’re a guy who screws around on the weekend and occasionally sells some stuff just to supplement your new tools(toys) then nothing is really “worth it”. I’ve got a couple of Lie-Nielson planes and there is no rational way I could justify the price other than to say I just want it. None of the Festool stuff falls into that category for me yet.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

894 posts in 2930 days


#24 posted 04-09-2015 02:45 AM



I don t own a domino machine but have been tempted to get one. Whenever I stop into a WoodCraft store I can hear it calling me. Talking to the store owner, he mentioned most of his buyers for the domino are hobbyist. This surprised me because of the price. Definitely a very useful tool but too pricey for me as a hobbyist.

- Julian

That is what every hobbyist says, until the first Festool shows up in the shop. Once you get the quality of the tool, the hobby becomes the gear, and you get more. I fought it for a long time… I lost.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

894 posts in 2930 days


#25 posted 04-09-2015 02:47 AM



...I’ve got a couple of Lie-Nielson planes and there is no rational way I could justify the price other than to say I just want it. None of the Festool stuff falls into that category for me yet.

- mramseyISU

Just wait.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4304 posts in 2452 days


#26 posted 04-09-2015 12:06 PM

Bottom line:

If you like the technology, can recoup the cost and think you will use it enough, then its a no brainer. But I would pay attention to what the one poster who sold his said. You’re talking about a dedicated tool that does one thing, so you have to approach it with that in mind.

I agree with the other posters that Festool is too expensive tool for the average ww’er.
I can afford one, but I would never shell out $800 for a track saw or $1400 for miter saw or $600 for a vaccuum or
45 bucks for a storage box?. I just can’t see any way their miter saw or router can be THAT much better than mine to make it 2X as expensive.

I do think they have awesome DC and that’s important.

I also sense a certain snob factor, but that’s another thread.
I love the skit Stumpy Nubs did on Festool. Hilarious.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

264 posts in 2402 days


#27 posted 04-09-2015 12:33 PM



The title pretty much says it all. I ve seen for and against it, but a lot of the against is people saying they don t own it but it s overpriced. I have other tools that are on the list, however this is one I keep debating on the purchase of. I know a bunch of the festool products I could by without, but this one seems like there isn t a less expensive alternative. I would like to hear from owners of the products if it s really worth the cost.

I’ve been using slot mortisers for over 35 years. There are certainly less expensive alternatives to the domino. There have been dozens of diy slot mortisers over the years. No excuse…

http://woodcentral.com/articles/reviews/articles_729.shtml

- PhillipRCW

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

6735 posts in 3464 days


#28 posted 04-09-2015 01:43 PM


That is what every hobbyist says, until the first Festool shows up in the shop. Once you get the quality of the tool, the hobby becomes the gear, and you get more. I fought it for a long time… I lost.

- BroncoBrian

I diagree. I bought their tracksaw when it was the only one on the market (about 7 years ago). Haven’t bought another Festool yet, and don’t intend to (at least not a new one).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

594 posts in 2517 days


#29 posted 04-09-2015 02:44 PM


...I ve got a couple of Lie-Nielson planes and there is no rational way I could justify the price other than to say I just want it. None of the Festool stuff falls into that category for me yet.

- mramseyISU

Just wait.

- BroncoBrian

LA LA LA LA I can’t hear you.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32122 posts in 3838 days


#30 posted 04-09-2015 03:22 PM

I don’t know whether I’ll ever get one but I would like to have one anyways.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

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