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Fox Super Shop

by jbruce
posted 10-15-2014 03:10 PM


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77 replies

77 replies so far

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#1 posted 10-17-2014 01:59 AM

I used to be a dealer also, in northern IL. Sold about 10 of them before he went “down”. Had the privilege of visiting personally with Tony Fox. I still use one and have it decked out with all kinds of accessories. Have a spare stand, ways, and tail casting with spring. I was offered a complete one in good working order, but he wanted more than I could afford at the time.
Would you know anything about getting more parts and putting these into working order? What kind of issues getting them to southern IL in U.S.?
Let’s at least talk.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View jimlc's profile

jimlc

1 post in 1774 days


#2 posted 01-10-2015 12:59 AM

I am interested in one of the units (with electronics). Located about an hour west of Toronto. Are they still available?

You can reach me at [email protected]

View Fox2017's profile

Fox2017

6 posts in 982 days


#3 posted 03-12-2017 08:21 AM

Hi jbruce and jimlc,

It is ofcourse too late but do you still have Fox Super Shop Motor Head?

Will be possible to send one or two to Germany?

Thank you in advance!

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#4 posted 03-12-2017 11:43 PM

Canada to Germany could be really pricey!

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Fox2017's profile

Fox2017

6 posts in 982 days


#5 posted 03-13-2017 10:19 AM

Hello Dan,

I really like Tony Fox Head Stock Unit Design, and try build my own Wood Machine on its base.
If the cost of the Head Stock is around 100$ and shipping cost also 100$ it can be ok for me.

Best Regards.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#6 posted 03-13-2017 11:20 AM

Good deal! It is a very good design, I agree. Love the machines.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Fox2017's profile

Fox2017

6 posts in 982 days


#7 posted 03-13-2017 02:31 PM

Hello Dan,

Do you have contacts emails from jbruce or jimlc, maybe they have interest to sell some Fox Head Stock Units?

Best Regards.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#8 posted 03-13-2017 10:21 PM

I have communicated with them only through Lumberjocks, so you have what I have.

Just FYI, there’s an entire machine looks to be in good shape for sale on Ebay. It says local pick up only, so you would have to have a contact in the area to pick it up and prepare it for shipping.

Good luck.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Fox2017's profile

Fox2017

6 posts in 982 days


#9 posted 03-14-2017 08:45 AM

Hello Dan,

Thank you for Link. The machine seems pretty dead: no under cover for motor, no other parts for wood plate holding ect…

Can I ask you as experience Fox Shop user, how stable is the Super Fox Machine for Wood Turning operations,
because some colleagues says that even some usual Wood Turning Lathe (Jet ans other from China) are not enough stable, Frame (Frame Rails) and Headstock are not enough solid. A special for big plates, wood pices >30…40cm can be a stability problems?

Super Fox has one in one “pipe” structure and only one bearing – for Drill Press is ok but how it for Wood Turning?

For small and long parts i have no doubt…

Tank you.

George.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#10 posted 03-14-2017 11:46 PM

I didn’t notice the missing cover. The original Fox Supershop is a very strong machine I’d say comparable to most midrange 17” (its official rating) lathes. The maximum diameter over the carriage is 12”. It was (and is) used extensively for metal work, lathe and milling, so yes it’s very strong. I have a milling table, a 6” three jaw and an 8” 4 jaw metal working chucks. I watched a mechanic machine one head of a big block V8 using a Supershop. Tony Fox used them to expand his own manufacturing capabilities. The two pipes upon which the headstock rides have a 3/8” wall thickness, so there is no flexing and the spindle has four large ball bearings two in the quill and two in the splined driving quill. The idler shaft has two ball bearings. The quill has the longest extension of any homeowner type drill press at a full 6”. The base machine weighs in at something like 600 lbs if I remember correctly. I know it is all I could do in my younger days to lift one end with all the stuff removed and the head at the other end. The head by itself (with motor) is more than one wants to comfortably lift, so that is why there is an enormously powerful coil spring to counterbalance that weight. The casters retract, but I’ve never had one “walk” away from me even on the casters. In my demos, I would balance a USD quarter on edge with the machine at idle and run the RPM from 0 to 3600 and the quarter might spin a little, but never fell over or walked away. Any information to the contrary is from a knockoff where shortcuts may have been taken. 2 HP (zener diode controlled DC motor) is a little weak for professional turners doing large stock stuff. But by using the lowest of 3 ranges (max 900 RPM) there is sufficient power to get the job done. As the stock becomes balanced, the mid range (1000-3600) can be used effectively. It’s a solid mid-range lathe, but if you’re a professional, spend the money for a professional lathe. This multipurpose machine is designed for the serious hobbyist with limited shop space. Don’t expect to haul steel with a VW!
Almost all the parts are available off the shelf in US industrial suppliers. The ones that aren’t are readily made in a machine shop. I have replaced my lathe tool rest (which I snapped) with a Delta cam operated tool rest and I like it much better. I have a custom tail stock that I really like, and have rigged my router to be carried by the slotted carriage so I can do flutes, tapered flutes, template following and the like. Using parts from another Supershop, I can extend my lathe to 96” between centers with no middle supports.
It’s a great lathe for learning to turn because of the speed control and power combination. One can learn the skew cut at 32- 50 rpm and if the tool catches, the lathe momentarily stops preventing a serious accident. And so on, so on, so on, so forth.
DanK
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Fox2017's profile

Fox2017

6 posts in 982 days


#11 posted 03-15-2017 06:33 AM

Thank you Dan for proffesional help. Will try to get one Fox or Industrial Super Shop foe me … more hope that posible… very hard to finde… Best Regards. George.

View jbruce's profile

jbruce

2 posts in 1861 days


#12 posted 03-23-2017 09:22 PM

Power Heads offered above are no longer available.

Bruce

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#13 posted 03-27-2017 02:07 AM

Thanks for the offer, Jbruce, and for letting us know they are no longer available. I think you can edit the title to include “sold” or something.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View STnewman's profile

STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#14 posted 04-08-2017 04:28 PM

I bought a used fox supershop but I do not have the lathe chucks, collets etc and have been unable to locate on-line. I read where someone said the Delta parts are interchangeable and so on as well as other machines too. Do you have any specifics for those that are interchangeable which can be used such as size, model etc? My machine is a model ss 20; serial:1222

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#15 posted 04-08-2017 06:39 PM

I have not followed the various models that developed after the demise of Tony Fox’s operation where I was a dealer.
These machines, regardless of model, use R-8 collets in the headstock. “R-8 collets”http://http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-pc-Precision-R-8-Collet-Set/G1646 are available everywhere on the buying sites. In addition, there are many useful R-8 accessories like tapered receivers for MT-1 through MT-4, end mill holders, various other milling and boring tools. All of the standard SuperShop accessories used a 3/4” R-8. The only part you would need to turn to Delta for is the mortising chisel holder. The standard chuck for drilling was a 5/8” keyed Jacobs with a 3/4” tail, but I have added a keyless chuck integrated with R-8 stem inexpensively. Very handy. Any lathe drive center can be used…I like these. I use a SuperNova chuck with a #2 MT adapter for bowls. I would recommend, as I’m going to do shortly, have a machine shop turn an adapter with a 3/4” stub shaft on the headstock end and 1” x 8 tpi thread on the other to the chuck. By the time the other multiple adapters mentioned above get put together, the chuck is hanging quite a ways from the headstock. I want it closer, though it seems to work fine. Ideally there would be an R-8 adapter with 1×8 threads. Somewhere…someday.
Keep in touch. It will be fun to see this develop. I’ll send pictures to email if you want. What part of the world are you in?
DanK
I had a custom tail stock made (by a machine shop) that holds an arbor whose external threads and R-8 collet capabilities match the headstock. Very useful.

All the moving parts like bearings, belts, tooling are off the shelf hardware. Even the motors and electronics are available.

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#16 posted 04-08-2017 07:27 PM

Thank! I will check out the parts. I am interested in both metal and wood usage. The machine I have didnt have the band saw or any of the collets or chucks and I have had a hrad time finding anything specific to the Fox SS on Craigs List or ebay. I live in the Appalacian area in KY near the Red River Gorge.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#17 posted 04-08-2017 07:51 PM

OK, that’s about 5-6 hours away from here. My son lives near Nashville TN. Even that may be a little far for coffee!

Don’t bother trying to find stuff that’s not out there with Supershop brand on it. Face plates for wood turning are about the only tooling think I can think of that were made in the SS factory. It was simply a 3/16” thick disc welded to a a 3/4” shaft and turned true. You could make a dozen in a day if you have metal working capacity. I broke the wood lathe tool rest casting, but replaced it with a Delta tool holder which I like better anyway.

I have a 6” 3 jaw Yuasa metal working chuck and an 8” four jaw chuck. Both required custom back plates, which is not uncommon. Milling is easiest in the upright position, so a 90° angle plate under the X-Y table is useful. I haven’t found an x-y table that can be used for lathe tooling and milling, but I’m sure it’s out there. I’ll have to review some of the literature I’ve saved from Tony. They used to sell the metal working accessories, all of which were third party. One thing that may help is that you can find standard machine nuts that fit directly on the head stock spindle. That’s a good start for back plate adapter.

I don’t think the Fox 3 wheel band saw ever made it into production. I saw the prototype at the factory and I was anxiously awaiting it’s release, but got an “out of business” notice instead. Had some great features. I have a bracket that adapts to all Shopsmith tools, and it wouldn’t be hard to make one. Jointers were produced, but I have no interest in any jointer. There might be all of 20 that were ever made by Tony. A few might have been added from third party when the reproductions were being made.

You have a very fine base tool that uses universal tooling that is readily available. Some may require minor mods, but pretty open opportunities.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#18 posted 04-08-2017 11:05 PM

Good deal. I am looking forward to getting it going on. I have the 90’ table plate and the disc for the sander as well as the positioner for wood work/lathe. It needs belts and so forth. I think the motor is 3/4 hp but I am not sure and I am away form the house. Any pics you have of the items you’ve mentioned such as the adapter plate etc would be nice to look at. I am very new at the tool/die and/or wood lathe projects. Thx again!

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

64 posts in 2197 days


#19 posted 06-15-2017 01:37 PM

Dan/anyone, can you tell me what spindle thread is on the Fox Supershop? When I measure mine, I don’t come up with something realistic. I also have a Smithy Supershop and it’s spindle thread is 2 1/4” x 8 TPI.

For accessories for these machines, I’ve adapted a number of Shopsmith items by making a 5/8” “spindle” out of drill rod. By filing a tapered flat on the end (similar to the Shopsmith spindle), I can mount anything that fits the Shopsmith 5/8” spindle.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#20 posted 06-15-2017 07:19 PM

Yes, Ted, that’s the way to use ShopSmith Accessories on the main spindle. BTDT. As far as the main spindle thread, they should be the same as the Smithy I would think. I’ll have to go measure mine again. It’s odd, I know that for sure, and I’ve had custom back plates machined with the thread. I even had a custom tail stock made with the same thread so I can put the big chucks on either end, powered or stationary. I have found that there is a large Acme nut that will screw directly on the spindle and that’s how one chuck plate was made. They are not likely at your regular hardware store though.

Measured: 2” x 4 TPI Acme.

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

64 posts in 2197 days


#21 posted 06-15-2017 08:11 PM

Thanks, Dan. When I measured the threads, I got something like 1.9” so wasn’t sure if it was 2” or 50mm. I don’t have the owners manual for the Fox, so couldn’t check there.

The thread on the Smithy spindle is 2 1/4” x 8 TPI. I’ve got a 3 jaw and faceplate for it. But the Fox has the motorized carriage and it would have been nice if the spindles were the same.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#22 posted 06-16-2017 01:52 AM

I got a nice Nova chuck last year and I need to get an adapter made. They don’t mount up like metal cutting chucks, so it’s gonna end up on a threaded 3/4” stub. But that will cut 2” off its current mounting through three adapters!

I use the lateral feed often for turning. I have a router holder that will follow a template and that opens up a whole new class of options.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

64 posts in 2197 days


#23 posted 06-16-2017 11:02 AM

Your router set-up sounds interesting.

Regarding the Nova chuck, I have a Shopsmith adapter (type F or S) for it as well as an 1” x 8 TPI adapter so I can mount it on either the Supershop or on my mini lathe.

View STnewman's profile

STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#24 posted 07-06-2017 08:46 PM

Hey Dan, Ted or anyone, would you care to post or email a pic of the chuck set-up for the metal lathe function for the Fox Super Shop? I am going to order a 4 or 3 jaw chuck and 6” adapter plate from The Little Machine Shop. The plate must be fitted to my machine and it seems like I will need to have someone thread it for the spindle with 2” x 4 TPI? I will need a back plate as well it seems to fit the chuck in order to get the machine running. If you have any pics or advice please let me know. Thx

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#25 posted 07-06-2017 10:04 PM

This is a good shot of the chuck plate I had custom made for a 6” three jaw Yuasa chuck. This picture shows the chuck on my custom tailstock. I had a similar plate done for an 8” 4 jaw. You might be able to locate a machine nut that fits the spindle. I used to have a couple but used them elsewhere. But in all honesty the best thing is to take the spindle to a machine shop and let them fit the plate to it. It’s trivial to take it out. Remove the set screw on the top of the headstock. Release any depth stop setting. Then advance the spindle until the gear disengages, and HOLD ON TIGHTLY counting the turns to release the spring tension. The spindle should slide out as a unit. It’s a lot easier if you have another pair of strong hands.

Couple other setups for free. :)

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#26 posted 07-06-2017 11:10 PM

Sounds like a plan. Thanks for the pics and advice. The manual listed 6” as the maximum dia’ chuck. That must only be a reccomendation I suppose? Thx

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#27 posted 07-06-2017 11:44 PM

For metal working even 6” is big. I use it most often for wood working to hold odd stuff.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

64 posts in 2197 days


#28 posted 07-07-2017 03:43 PM

Dan, that’s quite the robust tailstock you’ve got there. Can you rotate the chuck or is it fixed? If you don’t mind my asking, what is it that you’re doing in that first photo—pillow block and spider as a steady rest—all very interesting? The second photo with the router also is an interesting set-up. I see you’re using it as a duplicator with the router sliding in and out on a track (similar to the sliding of the yoke on a radial arm saw). Care to comment on that as well? Is there a template in the background for controlling the router cut?

The SuperShop, as well as Shopsmiths, are so adaptable to custom set-ups in the right hands. Nevertheless, they get a lot of criticism, most of which stems from the saw function of these machines. Their versatility is surely overlooked by many.

STnewman, I’m curious regarding your plans for metalworking on the Supershop. A 4-Jaw independent chuck is more versatile than a 3-Jaw scroll chuck as it will accept more than just round stock. Iit’s more accurate as well, but take more time to set up properly.

I’ve got a 6” 3-Jaw and 10” faceplate that mount to my Smithy which has a 2 1/4” x 8 TPI spindle. Unfortunately, the don’t fit the Fox’s 2” x 4 TPI Acme spindle. I rarely use them as they’re overkill for most woodworking. I can also mount my Nova woodworking chuck using my homemade Shopsmith adapter.

I also have 5” 3-jaw and a 6” 4-jaw from Grizzly that fit a 1” x 8 TPI wood lathe spindle that I could mount to either the Fox or Smithy with an appropriate adapter.

Stnewman, I only added all of this regarding these chucks as there may be other options depending on what you’re planning, rather than having a custom backplate made in a machine shop. Although, a chuck mounted to the spindle threads is the strongest and most accurate option.

View Cannonball's profile

Cannonball

2 posts in 864 days


#29 posted 07-07-2017 10:01 PM

I am looking into a Fox Super Shop right now, but it is missing the motor mounting bracket and the motor itself, do you have either of those up for grabs and if so, can it be shipped to the Missoula Montana area?

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

64 posts in 2197 days


#30 posted 07-08-2017 12:36 AM

Cannonball, I don’t have any spare parts for these machines, but perhaps someone else will chime in. Nor do I know if Smithy parts will fit a Fox machine, but you could check with them. I’ve heard that the Smithy DC motor used in their Supershop and the controller are the same as those used in some Smithy metalworking machines, but don’t know for sure.

There is a Yahoo Supershop Group that isn’t very active, but someone there may have what you’re looking for. You can find the group at https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/SuperShopTool/info

You can keep an eye on Ebay for Supershops, but there’s not a lot there either. Right now there’s a Smithy Super Shop for $450, but it’s in Las Vagas. It’s been there for a while.

Just a suggestion, have you checked with the owner about whether he still has the motor and other parts. If he does, you likely could get it repaired. Also note that there’s a triple groove pulley on the motor.

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Cannonball

2 posts in 864 days


#31 posted 07-08-2017 12:53 AM

Ted, thanks for replying first off, and also thanks for all the pointers on where to find one. Do you know what the part number is for of the motors though?

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#32 posted 07-08-2017 02:27 AM

First, Ted.

The tailstock is hollow and can spin if I release the locks. It holds the R-8 collets with a draw bar like the headstock. The square block on the tail spindle has indexing holes in it, so one use is to lock the square to the spindle and rotate the spindle as needed stopped by the index pin in the holes (not clearly visible)
The pillow block setup was an attempt to power turn dowels against a fixed cutter. Needs work.

The router does ride on a rail (sometimes) and it follows a template (or a sample) on the rack mounted to the rear. You can just barely see it. The aluminum T-slot bar is holding a pair of wooden “tailstocks” holding a sample turning to be duplicated in this case. It can also hold a flat template.

The fingers along the top back are calipers (Craftsman/Sears sold them) that can be positioned along a turning at mile posts.

Cannonball, the part numbers are likely to be relative to who made it. Smithy has been helpful in the past. I do not have nor can I point you to a source, especially for the mounting bracket, which is unique to SuperShop. I wish I knew where the headstocks at the top of this post ended up. Somewhere in this post (I’ve slept since then) is the name of the company that made the motors for SuperShop. A lot of his inventory came from someone else’s off the shelf inventory. I think you can still download the owners manual which may give you part numbers.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View STnewman's profile

STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#33 posted 07-08-2017 04:00 PM



Dan, that s quite the robust tailstock you ve got there. Can you rotate the chuck or is it fixed? If you don t mind my asking, what is it that you re doing in that first photo—pillow block and spider as a steady rest—all very interesting? The second photo with the router also is an interesting set-up. I see you re using it as a duplicator with the router sliding in and out on a track (similar to the sliding of the yoke on a radial arm saw). Care to comment on that as well? Is there a template in the background for controlling the router cut?

The SuperShop, as well as Shopsmiths, are so adaptable to custom set-ups in the right hands. Nevertheless, they get a lot of criticism, most of which stems from the saw function of these machines. Their versatility is surely overlooked by many.

STnewman, I m curious regarding your plans for metalworking on the Supershop. A 4-Jaw independent chuck is more versatile than a 3-Jaw scroll chuck as it will accept more than just round stock. Iit s more accurate as well, but take more time to set up properly.

I ve got a 6” 3-Jaw and 10” faceplate that mount to my Smithy which has a 2 1/4” x 8 TPI spindle. Unfortunately, the don t fit the Fox s 2” x 4 TPI Acme spindle. I rarely use them as they re overkill for most woodworking. I can also mount my Nova woodworking chuck using my homemade Shopsmith adapter.

I also have 5” 3-jaw and a 6” 4-jaw from Grizzly that fit a 1” x 8 TPI wood lathe spindle that I could mount to either the Fox or Smithy with an appropriate adapter.

Stnewman, I only added all of this regarding these chucks as there may be other options depending on what you re planning, rather than having a custom backplate made in a machine shop. Although, a chuck mounted to the spindle threads is the strongest and most accurate option.

- Ted724

Thanks for the information about the chuck versatility. I will take that advice and go with the independent 4 jaw. I went ahead and ordered a smaller 3 jaw self-center based on your info. Thx!

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STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#34 posted 09-06-2017 03:07 AM

Hi All, I have run into some problems trying to get my Fox Super Shop running. I have included pictures of the switches and circuit board I found upon disassembly and a pic of the wiring diagram from the manual I bought for my machine. As you can see there are differences and the wires and switches seem to have been cut and spliced. So I don’t really know if the variable speed switch, the toggle Power Key switch, the terminal block and the SCR Module are correct. The device that should be the SCR Module has labeling that appears to be from an automobile window wiper and/or power booster or some such. The “terminal block” on my machine is actually two separate pieces. Any ideas about what type of electronics and switches I should try to use for the 1 & 1/2 hp motor and circuit board; or any pictures of the guts of your machine you could share? I cannot load the images.

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Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#35 posted 09-06-2017 11:29 AM

ST, you may be best off to find an electrical engineer who is good with heavy duty electrical circuits. I’ve been very fortunate to have had very little problems with the electronics, and when I did, I stumbled into NOS for replacement. One of my machines is having trouble holding a constant RPM, so a problem may be developing that I will have to deal with at some point.
It does sound like someone has tinker rigged it. The most likely failure is on the SCR circuit board. It could be just a matter of tuning any adjustable resistors on the board. The switch is nothing special…on/off.
I don’t know how a picture would help, but I can take the cover off one (an original) and get a shot if you need it. Worst case scenario is you (at least temporarily) bypass the variable speed system. You end up with three speeds.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

64 posts in 2197 days


#36 posted 09-06-2017 12:55 PM

ST, if your motor is still in working order, perhaps the simplest solution would be to pick up a DC motor controller and bypass what you have now. Some can be quite expensive, but Ebay may have something you can use. Also there is a Yahoo group for the SuperShop and there is some information there on controllers as well as some photos that could be helpful. See—https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/SuperShopTool/

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STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#37 posted 09-06-2017 02:35 PM

Thanks Guys, I will see what I can come up with. I was thinking of trying any switch, etc from a comparable older model lathe that may found on line such as Grizzly and so on. It would take some rearranging wires but should work I’d imagine as long as it is a basic switch and speed controller.

View BrianPK's profile

BrianPK

5 posts in 922 days


#38 posted 09-29-2017 12:08 AM

Hey guys,

I am new to the forum and have a simple question. My father way back purchase a Smithy Supershop and a Fox Supershop for my brother and I. I ended up with the Fox Supershop thats never been used. (Except to see if it still works) I really don’t have any idea of its worth. I am not necessary going to sell it but I don’t know what questions to ask and really what I have. Any input would be great! Also if this isn’t the place to ask please direct me.

Thanks,
Brian

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Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#39 posted 09-29-2017 02:47 AM

Well, Brian, the first thing to learn is how to use it safely. There are some inherent dangers that should be avoided. Get an owners manual if you can find one. I have one, but don’t have the means to digitize it. As mentioned above, I used to be a dealer, so I know the machine pretty well.

First piece of advice is to ALWAYS turn the speed control knob to minimum at the end of each use. This way, if you forget to do something, it won’t blow up and cause a problem. You’ll notice the problem developing as you turn up the “volume”. Beginners often forget the speed range used last. It would be disastrous to have used the shaper at 7200 RPM and start up the lathe with a chunk of “explosive” in it.

Because no one makes them anymore, and people don’t know their value, they tend to sell cheaply. I bought a pristine one with lots of accessories for $600. I think they are the cat’s meow. Almost any wear part can be bought at an auto parts store. The electronics are something else, but serviceable.

Ask any questions here and I’ll do my best to answer them for you. Love to see a picture of it.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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BrianPK

5 posts in 922 days


#40 posted 09-29-2017 03:19 AM

Hi Dan,

Here is some pic’s. I am not much of a wood worker so I will probably sell it to someone who will use it rather then collect dust. I just spoke to my dad (91 yrs strong) He said he did do some work on it, but that was about it. Anyway here is some pic’s.
Brian

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Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#41 posted 09-29-2017 02:27 PM

Your pictures show only the back side. One important distinction that would show in a front side shot is the lateral feed switch. The lateral movement of the carriage is powered by a variable speed motor independent of the main motor. You can see the curly power cord in these pictures. Smithy dropped that feature so it’s likely your brother’s machine does not have that feature. Another thing that a front shot would show is if the cavity in the base is fitted with drawers or empty. Early models had the drawers. I see only standard equipment that was sold with the machine, but the standard set of lathe tools seems to be absent.

This is an excellent machine to learn to turn wood because of its low speed power. A piece of wood can be spun at 32 rpm and that makes it very safe to learn the difficult but very desirable skew cutting action of various lathe tools. A “catch” would be utterly harmless and not even scary. The action is slow enough to see what is happening. The standard lathe tool set did not include any bowl cutters, but the tools that were there were of excellent quality.

I wish you were closer, but then again not…I’d be too tempted!

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#42 posted 09-29-2017 05:33 PM

Hello all, I have been trying to get my Fox running as you may have noticed in the postings. I am interesred in the machine if you plan to sell it rather than use it. Let me know and I will send you some contact info. Thx!

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BrianPK

5 posts in 922 days


#43 posted 09-29-2017 05:57 PM

Here are some more Pic’s,

Please do send me you information because i am leaning to sell it. I am located in the Salt Lake City area.

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STnewman

10 posts in 955 days


#44 posted 09-30-2017 12:45 AM

Ah, I thought you were in Olney IL. I live in KY. I suppose my family could make vaction flight and Road Trip back using a Uhaul but I imagine that would be way more costly than using the same funds to purchase something nearby. My cell number is 606 422 0245.

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Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#45 posted 09-30-2017 12:49 AM

I live in Olney, ST. :)

I forgot that you wanted pictures of the circuit boards. It requires some disassembly, but I’ll try to get some next week.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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BrianPK

5 posts in 922 days


#46 posted 09-30-2017 02:17 AM

Hey thanks for the information. Wish you where closer, because I would like it to go to someone who would truely enjoy it. If ever you change your mind and want to make a trip let me know. Brian 602-686-3304. Thanks

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Emf123

12 posts in 588 days


#47 posted 04-10-2018 03:05 AM

Dan I have some questions on a super shop thats for sale and it has some issues that I need someone who really knows the machine. If I could speak with you it would be appreciated so so much.

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Emf123

12 posts in 588 days


#48 posted 04-10-2018 03:09 AM

Anyone know where to get electrically parts for fox super shop?

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Emf123

12 posts in 588 days


#49 posted 04-10-2018 03:11 AM

I need any videos that show the fox super shop in action. Anyone have any links.

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Ted724

64 posts in 2197 days


#50 posted 04-10-2018 11:50 AM



Anyone know where to get electrically parts for fox super shop?

- Emf123


You can try Smithy at smithy.com. They sold the SuperShop until they dropped the line some years back. I heard that the motor in their version of the machine is the same as the motor in one of their metal combination machines, but don’t know this for certain. Don’t know how Smithy electrics would work on a Fox SuperShop if that’s the model you have.

Regarding videos, Smithy had posted some videos on youtube about the SuperShop, but apparently they’re no longer available. You could try watching some of the Shopsmith demo videos for some insight into using the SuperShop, but there are some differences.

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