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View bygrace's profile

help with identifying wood

by bygrace
posted 10-02-2014 03:54 PM


26 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8773 posts in 3091 days


#1 posted 10-02-2014 04:02 PM

You’re wise to worry about the stain reaction. Maybe use the
conditioner and practice on parts not seen and see how
the stain reacts.

HTH and good luck now.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2281 days


#2 posted 10-02-2014 04:32 PM

Looks like cherry which is odd. It should be maple.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12913 posts in 2894 days


#3 posted 10-02-2014 04:37 PM

Top pic looks like soft maple, probably red maple.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View bygrace's profile

bygrace

198 posts in 2483 days


#4 posted 10-02-2014 04:45 PM

waho6o9 – I’ll definitely be using a wood conditioner. Used Charles Neil’s on the cherry table I just did. Got a little impatient and only used one coat conditioner and then stained it. Whoops, had to sand it all back down and put on two coats conditioner like Charles suggested!

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

7084 posts in 3112 days


#5 posted 10-02-2014 04:45 PM

looks like maple to me too.

View bygrace's profile

bygrace

198 posts in 2483 days


#6 posted 10-02-2014 04:48 PM

mrjinx – I think its too soft to be cherry, you might be right about the maple, just a different maple than I’ve used before.

Rick – soft maple sounds like it could be the one, Thanks

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 2134 days


#7 posted 10-02-2014 04:58 PM

If it’s too soft to be cherry it’s also too soft to be maple. Red maple, bigleaf maple, they all have a hardness at least as hard as cherry. (Though I agree it looks a little like maple).

Could it be Alder?

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12913 posts in 2894 days


#8 posted 10-02-2014 05:06 PM

Silver maple is very soft.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

986 posts in 2035 days


#9 posted 10-02-2014 09:33 PM

I agree it’s likely some kind of soft maple. It could also be birch, if it’s got a faint grain. In the bottom picture, however, some of the character makes me think of beech. ..Kind of hard to tell, though. It’s a bit out of focus. It wouldn’t be unusual for a commercially-made, stained chair to be made out of different, similarly colored woods.

View ScottM1's profile

ScottM1

134 posts in 2097 days


#10 posted 10-02-2014 10:35 PM

My first impression from the greenish hue and the description of the softness of the wood I would say that it is poplar. Poplar will stain similar to cherry but you may have to use a toner first to get it to a base color that resembles unfinished cherry. The problem that I have come across with trying to match woods like oak and maple and even poplar is that you will have to stain a sample of the oak and then by blending and/or using toners and maybe layering different colors of stains. For example you might use a reddish orange stain first let that dry then apply a darker stain over that. What type of application method are you using i.e. wiping or spraying on the stain?

-- Scott Marshburn,https://www.youtube.com/user/ecabinetstips, FaceBook, https://www.facebook.com/ecabinetstipsandtricks, Twitter, https://twitter.com/eCabinetstips

View mporter's profile

mporter

253 posts in 3092 days


#11 posted 10-02-2014 10:35 PM

I disagree with Rick M fully, silver maple is hard, not very soft. It’s almost as hard as hard maple.

It looks exactly like a cheap species of mahogany to me. I can’t think of the species now but menards sells it. Looks exactly like it. Similar to Luan.

View JFred's profile

JFred

210 posts in 2059 days


#12 posted 10-02-2014 10:50 PM

I agree with Scottm1, it sure looks like poplar. It’s a way manufacturing companies could cheet by using good hardwood for table tops then use a cheaper wood for secondary pieces. then they would spray a stain-sealer-top coat on thick to blend the wood tones. If you notice the underside of the table or chair or any piece of furniture you can see where it was sprayed on. And poplar being a soft hardwood and the grain pattern and color leads me to believe that is very well may be.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 2990 days


#13 posted 10-03-2014 12:49 AM

I also think that it could be yellow poplar. Much softer than soft maple. But, it could be soft maple, too. Kinda hard to tell from the pics.

Red maple is the common soft maple in the Industry. Red maple and cherry are pretty close in density and hardness.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View bygrace's profile

bygrace

198 posts in 2483 days


#14 posted 10-03-2014 01:13 AM

Thank you all for your input. ScottM1, I may go ahead and stain the table first and then try and match the chairs to it the way you described. I was gonna do the chairs first to get the hard part out of the way, but staining the table first sounds like the way to go.

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

20582 posts in 2371 days


#15 posted 10-03-2014 01:47 AM

I’ve used both silver and red maple recently. Silver is like using poplar and it’s quite soft. Red maple is very similar to hard maple. You can tell just by holding it in your hand.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12913 posts in 2894 days


#16 posted 10-03-2014 02:00 AM


I disagree with Rick M fully, silver maple is hard, not very soft. It s almost as hard as hard maple.

It looks exactly like a cheap species of mahogany to me. I can t think of the species now but menards sells it. Looks exactly like it. Similar to Luan.

- mporter

You may have confused silver with sugar maple. Sugar maple is the hard maple, silver is the softest maple. But neither one look anything like mahogany.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3263 posts in 3189 days


#17 posted 10-03-2014 02:50 AM

A lot of commercial manufacturers use poplar.

View ScottM1's profile

ScottM1

134 posts in 2097 days


#18 posted 10-03-2014 09:54 PM

The way that I would go about this is to Find me some poplar that is a good match to the chairs. Then before staining the oak top try to match the color of the stripped oak on the poplar sample. After I have a good match on this then I would proceed with staining the oak top. The key is to tone the poplar to mimic the stripped oak then go from there. We recently came across a similar situation with a gun cabinet. The customer stored it under a open shelter and it got some water damage to it. We had to replace the base section with new construction. After we stripped the finish off we used some spray toner to give the new oak a aged/weathered look to match the stripped oak then we were able to stain the entire piece. With no obvious difference. The difficult part about your project is that you need to turn poplar into oak. This is almost imposable to do with the grain but you can with some trial and error get an acceptable color tone to match.

-- Scott Marshburn,https://www.youtube.com/user/ecabinetstips, FaceBook, https://www.facebook.com/ecabinetstipsandtricks, Twitter, https://twitter.com/eCabinetstips

View bygrace's profile

bygrace

198 posts in 2483 days


#19 posted 10-03-2014 10:33 PM

ScottM1 – Thanks for the advice. I understand what you’re saying. I guess it doesn’t really matter what kind of wood it is, It’s just getting it to look like oak, and then staining! Thanks so much.

-- Andy, Waxahachie, Tx.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 3001 days


#20 posted 10-03-2014 11:10 PM

http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/differences-between-hard-maple-and-soft-maple/

Not to disagree with ScottM1, but there is no need to find another piece of wood.

Instead, just practice on the seat bottom.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View ScottM1's profile

ScottM1

134 posts in 2097 days


#21 posted 10-04-2014 12:18 AM

Yes Dallas you are correct a seat bottom would work great but it would need to be sanded and prepped exactly as the rest of the chairs thus the plentiful supply of sample boards. It has been my experience to start out with a sample and then when I get a good match go to the seat bottom then proceed from there. But the seat bottom must be prepped exactly as the rest of the project.

-- Scott Marshburn,https://www.youtube.com/user/ecabinetstips, FaceBook, https://www.facebook.com/ecabinetstipsandtricks, Twitter, https://twitter.com/eCabinetstips

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 2990 days


#22 posted 10-04-2014 12:05 PM

I can’t see how poplar or soft maple will ever look like oak.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View ScottM1's profile

ScottM1

134 posts in 2097 days


#23 posted 10-04-2014 01:14 PM

The grain will never match without doing a foe grain using a graining tool of witch I have never tried. However the color can with toners and stain and maybe a shading additive in the sealer.

-- Scott Marshburn,https://www.youtube.com/user/ecabinetstips, FaceBook, https://www.facebook.com/ecabinetstipsandtricks, Twitter, https://twitter.com/eCabinetstips

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12913 posts in 2894 days


#24 posted 10-04-2014 06:29 PM

In my shop is a small roll top desk made from cherry, maple, and oak. It looks factory but is obviously made from scraps (it’s origin is a mystery). Anyway, they did a really good job toning all the wood to look like cherry but the oak is still obviously oak. Best of luck.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View ScottM1's profile

ScottM1

134 posts in 2097 days


#25 posted 10-04-2014 07:17 PM

I totally agree with Rick M. I have a cabinet that I made when my wife and I got married to set our new state of the art microwave on. I used scrap that I had laying around. I used basswood for the face frame and door rails and stiles the ends where from birch plywood the panels for the doors were oak. The end result actually was quite impressive. as a mater of fact I sold several just like it. the contrast in the grain was the eye catcher.

-- Scott Marshburn,https://www.youtube.com/user/ecabinetstips, FaceBook, https://www.facebook.com/ecabinetstipsandtricks, Twitter, https://twitter.com/eCabinetstips

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

986 posts in 2035 days


#26 posted 10-04-2014 07:55 PM

I spoke before I read .. sorry. No way to delete it.

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