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View matermark's profile

ELECTRICAL--IN A KITCHEN, can you have an elect. outlet inside a cabinet?

by matermark
posted 09-29-2014 08:26 AM


46 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5349 posts in 5016 days


#1 posted 09-29-2014 01:02 PM

Don’t know about your local codes, but they (recepts) are ok here. How else would ya plug in a microwave?
Bill

-- [email protected]

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

7195 posts in 2776 days


#2 posted 09-29-2014 01:08 PM

I have a receptacle in the back of the cabinet over the microwave/range vent and it was done when the house was built. This to me is far preferable than having something hardwired with just a wire poking through the wall, much cleaner.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1163 posts in 3746 days


#3 posted 09-29-2014 01:13 PM

Do it!

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7741 posts in 3062 days


#4 posted 09-29-2014 01:14 PM

Built in dishwashers are usually plugged in under the sink cabinet. And I have also seen garbage disposals so the outlet and switch are in the cabinet also

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Blackcatbone's profile

Blackcatbone

32 posts in 2406 days


#5 posted 09-29-2014 01:15 PM

Always check with your local codes because they are the devil (mostly). It’s probably okay but they may have rules regarding exactly how it’s placed, whether the cabinet is open or has a door, the voltage, etc., etc.

-- . . . it's cheaper than therapy.

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#6 posted 09-29-2014 01:16 PM

I think because it’s an over the range microwave surrounded by cabinets on 3 sides (top, left, right) it can be hard wired.

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View Scott C.'s profile

Scott C.

162 posts in 3106 days


#7 posted 09-29-2014 01:18 PM

If it’s mounted flush to the wall your fine, if you want the outlet and cover to sit flush with the back of the cabinet you’d have to use a gang box extender.

-- measure twice, cut once, swear and start over.

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#8 posted 09-29-2014 01:51 PM

Thanks everybody! Then I will mount the box flush to the wall and make the back of the cabinet open in that area and make a door for the front or a tambour.

Anybody know any code about minimum distance the surrounding wall cabs must be from the stove? I know most wall cabs go 18” above countertop but I do some canning (google Annie’s Salsa) and the pressure canner is pretty tall so was thinking 24” from stove to bottom of OTR microwave, but can the wall cabs surrounding the microwave hang lower?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

950 posts in 4121 days


#9 posted 09-29-2014 02:01 PM

I have outlets in cabinets for microwave, range hood, cook top, dishwasher, disposal and wall oven here. I’d go for it.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1376 posts in 2616 days


#10 posted 09-29-2014 02:19 PM

Any outlet that serves counter top space in a kitchen needs to be GFCI protected per the 2011 NEC. Since you plan to leave this outlet accessible to plug in other counter top appliances if needed may make that outlet subject to the GFCI requirement.

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#11 posted 09-29-2014 04:26 PM


Any outlet that serves counter top space in a kitchen needs to be GFCI protected per the 2011 NEC. Since you plan to leave this outlet accessible to plug in other counter top appliances if needed may make that outlet subject to the GFCI requirement.

- WhyMe


Would this be considered as such? It will be ~33” above the countertop… I’m all for safety but do they have a 4-outlet GFCI receptacle? Or can I stack 1 above another on the wall? And is the code for countertop area or entire kitchen? I would probably need one behind the stove instead of where it is now. Would a breaker be cheaper or would I do one GFCI and connect the restof the recptacles downline?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4615 posts in 4797 days


#12 posted 09-29-2014 06:32 PM

They are OK here. Our dishwasher and garbage disposal both are plugged into a GFI outlet inside the undersink cabinet in the kitchen.

Also seen outlets away from water in a cabinet to handle some of the messes of all the charging stations for cordless mixers, and cellphones, and undercabinet TV’s

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 3542 days


#13 posted 09-29-2014 07:10 PM

Call your local inspector or permit place.

Here and in Indiana, circa 1998, a receptacle in the kitchen had to be GFCI and had to be 18” away from any water source, (even lines in the wall including waste pipes or stacks).

I forgot to mention, you are allowed to use a GFCI breaker to service your receptacles up to a certain number.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1376 posts in 2616 days


#14 posted 09-29-2014 08:04 PM

Any outlet that serves counter top space in a kitchen needs to be GFCI protected per the 2011 NEC. Since you plan to leave this outlet accessible to plug in other counter top appliances if needed may make that outlet subject to the GFCI requirement.

- WhyMe

Would this be considered as such? It will be ~33” above the countertop… I m all for safety but do they have a 4-outlet GFCI receptacle? Or can I stack 1 above another on the wall? And is the code for countertop area or entire kitchen? I would probably need one behind the stove instead of where it is now. Would a breaker be cheaper or would I do one GFCI and connect the restof the recptacles downline?

- matermark

All I can say is what NEC states. It says outlets installed to serve counter top surfaces in kitchens shall be GFCI protected, there is no distance set in the code. The cheapest way is to have the outlets protected by an upstream GFCI outlet. You can also use a double gang box with 1 GFCI outlet protecting the second outlet.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10863 posts in 2541 days


#15 posted 09-29-2014 08:25 PM

A typical 2000w microwave just about taps out a 20A ckt. FYI.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 3542 days


#16 posted 09-29-2014 08:46 PM

2000W /125V = equal about 16a, significantly more than a 15a breaker should handle.

Still not even close to a 20A circuit breaker.

Remember, your breakers are subject to heat failure. If they are subject to 90-110°F, whether actual or from otherheat from the breaker box, they may fail.
Circuit breakers are only rated for 80% load. If it exceeds that you’ll find all bets off.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#17 posted 09-29-2014 08:53 PM



Call your local inspector or permit place.

Here and in Indiana, circa 1998, a receptacle in the kitchen had to be GFCI and had to be 18” away from any water source, (even lines in the wall including waste pipes or stacks).

I forgot to mention, you are allowed to use a GFCI breaker to service your receptacles up to a certain number.

- Dallas


I guess I may have to reconsider that pot filler…

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#18 posted 09-29-2014 08:57 PM



A typical 2000w microwave just about taps out a 20A ckt. FYI.

- TheFridge


2000 watt??? Is that typical? I thought mine was 1000 or 1100w. I’ll have to dig out the manual—the microwave is brand new, sitting in its box since around 2007, on top of the new fridge. I’m using the fridge & stove already, couldn’t wait…

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 3542 days


#19 posted 09-29-2014 09:06 PM

Damn, wrong C&P

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1376 posts in 2616 days


#20 posted 09-29-2014 10:15 PM


2000W /125V = equal about 16a, significantly more than a 15a breaker should handle.

Still not even close to a 20A circuit breaker.

Remember, your breakers are subject to heat failure. If they are subject to 90-110°F, whether actual or from otherheat from the breaker box, they may fail.
Circuit breakers are only rated for 80% load. If it exceeds that you ll find all bets off.

- Dallas

It’s not that breakers are rated for 80%, it’s that the NEC allows for the continuous circuit load to be no more than 80% of breaker capacity. So 16A is the max allowed continuous load on a 20A circuit.

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#21 posted 09-29-2014 10:32 PM

OK, the microwave box says 950W and the Install sheet says 120V, 1600W. It is a convection microwave (can heat up to 450 degrees F.) It can be ducted or recycling. The old 1940’s stove had a duct up & a 90* turn to the right—the chimney is maybe a foot to the right of the stove. The new stove doesn’t vent anywhere. My hope is to find a way to have a 110V receptacle, a plate rack w/maybe 6-10 dishes, and maybe even a functioning duct…

The install directions are here:
http://manuals.frigidaire.com/prodinfo_pdf/Springfield/316488509en.pdf

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3264 posts in 3731 days


#22 posted 09-29-2014 11:05 PM

The code states that any receptacle serving a kitchen counter must be GFCI protected. This does not state any distance. That is old code. All islands must have a receptacle. The receptacle behind the range and the receptacle in the cabinet for the microwave does not serve the kitchen counter. Microwaves usually come with a manual that states they recommend you put them on their own circuit. If you vent them outside the room, they MUST go outside the home and have an approved hood or vent closure on the end. This closure must have a backdraft preventer in it. Vent hoods cannot exhaust into the attic. There are further codes for the pipe on the hood. I see electric receptacles in cabinets every day. They are good but you can’t build them and decide to throw the door open and plug in your mixer 6 or 7 feet above the counter. Cabinets are typically 16 inches above the counter surface.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 4286 days


#23 posted 09-29-2014 11:15 PM

The outlet for our microwave was above it in the small cabinet. If I understand it, it must be on a dedicated 20 amp circuit. The outlet is in a conduit box with an extender and the plastic duplex cover on it.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1376 posts in 2616 days


#24 posted 09-29-2014 11:19 PM

If I was adding the outlet for the microwave, I’d put in a dedicated 20A circuit. And since you are placing it to be available for counter/stove top use I’d make it GFCI.

View carver1942's profile

carver1942

93 posts in 2760 days


#25 posted 09-29-2014 11:42 PM

Plugging appliances into an outlet that far above a stove or counter is an accident about to happen. To have loose wires dangling from a cabinet to a counter or stove. is dangerous. If a child snags a cord and pulls something down they can be severely scalded. I don’t understand why you are not putting outlets where they are normally placed at the back walls between your counters and cabinets. Plugging a microwave into a cabinet outlet is fine, but to plug appliances into an outlet inside a cabinet, above a stove or counter to me is impractical and dangerous. JMHO

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Grandpa

3264 posts in 3731 days


#26 posted 09-29-2014 11:55 PM

No, don’t put them inside the cabinets. The microwave can be plugged into a receptacle inside the cabinet. The food disposal and the dishwasher can be plugged into a receptacle under the sink. I don’t think you would want the microwave to be GFCI protected. They trip too easily. Leave the receptacle behind the range. You need it for a clock. Never plug the refrigerator, freezer or washing machine into a GFCI protected receptacle.

View Scott C.'s profile

Scott C.

162 posts in 3106 days


#27 posted 09-30-2014 12:03 AM

Don’t forget about Tamper resistant codes. My inspector made me replace all my GFCI’s with tamper resistant ones, which was about $200+ in new outlets. It’s a relatively new code, check to see if your city has adopted it.

-- measure twice, cut once, swear and start over.

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#28 posted 09-30-2014 01:40 AM

Thanks for all the replies, let me add a drawing to make things easier to understand.

To the right of the microwave, it’s hard to see but there’s a filler that’s about 4.5” wide between the microwave and the cabinet that surrounds the chimney. If you look at the subway tile you can make out the front & side of the chimney.

I will have to remeasure but the wall between the doorway woodwork and the chimney is 48”. The stove, microwave and plate rack cabinet are 30” wide. The left cabinets, both wall and base, are 9” wide.

The crown moldings are creating an optical illusion, they are just 4” tall. The top of the subway tiles over the doorway is the same height as the top of the crown moldings over the plate rack cabinet. I used to have the plate rack “door” at the right end but now centered it.

The current outlet is ~55” from bottom to floor, and about 23” between the the door molding and receptacle plate.

The bottom of the microwave would be at 58-13/16” from the floor—interfering with the present outlet receptacle.

The plate rack cabinet is 15” tall, and 75” from bottom to floor.

If I move the microwave up to clear the existing outlet, I’d have to reduce the cabinet height from 15”, which will limit plate size (or make them sit at a lower angle like 45*.

Right now, the stove is plugged into the existing outlet, and so is the fryer & microwave (fryer’s cord only; the current microwave sits on top of a tall microwave cart currently in front of the chimney.) If I lower the current outlet, the microwave cord probably would need to go to a receptacle somewhere else—I don’t think there’s any way for the cord to go DOWN to the outlet because of the lower mounting bracket…

ANY IDEAS?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#29 posted 09-30-2014 01:43 AM



Plugging appliances into an outlet that far above a stove or counter is an accident about to happen. To have loose wires dangling from a cabinet to a counter or stove. is dangerous. If a child snags a cord and pulls something down they can be severely scalded. I don t understand why you are not putting outlets where they are normally placed at the back walls between your counters and cabinets. Plugging a microwave into a cabinet outlet is fine, but to plug appliances into an outlet inside a cabinet, above a stove or counter to me is impractical and dangerous. JMHO

- carver1942


No kids here, but I get your point. See my post above…about bracket interference… where would you move or add outlets?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#30 posted 09-30-2014 01:51 AM



The code states that any receptacle serving a kitchen counter must be GFCI protected. This does not state any distance. That is old code. All islands must have a receptacle. The receptacle behind the range and the receptacle in the cabinet for the microwave does not serve the kitchen counter. Microwaves usually come with a manual that states they recommend you put them on their own circuit. If you vent them outside the room, they MUST go outside the home and have an approved hood or vent closure on the end. This closure must have a backdraft preventer in it. Vent hoods cannot exhaust into the attic. There are further codes for the pipe on the hood. I see electric receptacles in cabinets every day. They are good but you can t build them and decide to throw the door open and plug in your mixer 6 or 7 feet above the counter. Cabinets are typically 16 inches above the counter surface.

- Grandpa


No need to worry about venting, I don’t think. I was going to either use the recirculating method, or pipe into the chimney, if that’s okay.

What originally made me think of the trap door outlet, besides the microwave power source, was I use a stick immersion blender a.k.a. outboard motor blender. It gets plunged up to about 6” deep into a pot of stuff like sauce cooking on the stove, canned tomatoes, etc.

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#31 posted 09-30-2014 01:54 AM



The outlet for our microwave was above it in the small cabinet. If I understand it, it must be on a dedicated 20 amp circuit. The outlet is in a conduit box with an extender and the plastic duplex cover on it.

- MT_Stringer


Is the cabinet usable for ANYTHING else besides power to the microwave?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 4286 days


#32 posted 09-30-2014 03:44 AM


The outlet for our microwave was above it in the small cabinet. If I understand it, it must be on a dedicated 20 amp circuit. The outlet is in a conduit box with an extender and the plastic duplex cover on it.

- MT_Stringer

Is the cabinet usable for ANYTHING else besides power to the microwave?

- matermark

No. It it is a dedicated circuit. We just ran it last week. However, in the previous location over the stove, there was a dedicated 20 amp circuit. Now it is hardwired to a new range vent hood. We relocated our microwave so a tile mosaic could be applied to the wall above the stove.

Don’t overload your outlets. Holiday cooking will trip the breaker if you aren’t carefull.

Just a thought. I thought I read where it is code to have at least 15 inches of counter space adjacent to the stove to provide a place to sit pots or pans. Have you checked that out? I read it on the internet so it must be true! :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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B4B

173 posts in 2413 days


#33 posted 09-30-2014 06:47 AM

If this is a permitted job, check with local code. Diychatroom.con has a good bunch and you could post in their electrical forum for advice.

-- There's two routers in my vocab, one that moves data and one that removes wood, the latter being more relevant on this forum.

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#34 posted 09-30-2014 01:39 PM

The outlet for our microwave was above it in the small cabinet. If I understand it, it must be on a dedicated 20 amp circuit. The outlet is in a conduit box with an extender and the plastic duplex cover on it.

- MTStringer

Is the cabinet usable for ANYTHING else besides power to the microwave?

- matermark

No. It it is a dedicated circuit. We just ran it last week. However, in the previous location over the stove, there was a dedicated 20 amp circuit. Now it is hardwired to a new range vent hood. We relocated our microwave so a tile mosaic could be applied to the wall above the stove.

Don t overload your outlets. Holiday cooking will trip the breaker if you aren t carefull.

Just a thought. I thought I read where it is code to have at least 15 inches of counter space adjacent to the stove to provide a place to sit pots or pans. Have you checked that out? I read it on the internet so it must be true! :-)

- MTStringer


Thanks. What I meant was what else do you put in the cabinet? Does it have a duct and outlet? just an outlet? Do you store anything in it? Or is it really a waste of space with no actual use other than to hide that outlet and/or duct?

Also, I probably should have asked if your stove is gas or electric. My current outlet at 55” height is for my gas stove which has a digital control panel on the front, plus the fan for the convection.

P.S. I have nightmares about the width of that base cabinet! I thought I heard 12”. Seriously, look at how cramped that wall is; what other options are there?!

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#35 posted 09-30-2014 01:49 PM



If this is a permitted job, check with local code. Diychatroom.con has a good bunch and you could post in their electrical forum for advice.

- B4B


Thanks, I’ll go check it out.

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32122 posts in 3922 days


#36 posted 09-30-2014 02:08 PM

My last house had an outlet in the cabinet just above the microwave but I don’t know what the code says about it.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#37 posted 09-30-2014 02:36 PM



My last house had an outlet in the cabinet just above the microwave but I don t know what the code says about it.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

- helluvawreck

Thanks Charles. Was anything else in that cabinet? Were you able to still use it as a storage cabinet?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1376 posts in 2616 days


#38 posted 09-30-2014 02:44 PM



No, don t put them inside the cabinets. The microwave can be plugged into a receptacle inside the cabinet. The food disposal and the dishwasher can be plugged into a receptacle under the sink. I don t think you would want the microwave to be GFCI protected. They trip too easily. Leave the receptacle behind the range. You need it for a clock. Never plug the refrigerator, freezer or washing machine into a GFCI protected receptacle.

- Grandpa

Well those are very broad base conclusions. A good quality GFCI outlet will not trip easily unless there is an electrical problem in the equipment. And it’s kinda hard to get around not having a washer receptacle on GFCI now that 2014 NEC calls for it and GFCI is also needed if the outlet is within 6 feet of a sink edge.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 4286 days


#39 posted 09-30-2014 03:20 PM

The outlet for our microwave was above it in the small cabinet. If I understand it, it must be on a dedicated 20 amp circuit. The outlet is in a conduit box with an extender and the plastic duplex cover on it.

- MTStringer

Is the cabinet usable for ANYTHING else besides power to the microwave?

- matermark

No. It it is a dedicated circuit. We just ran it last week. However, in the previous location over the stove, there was a dedicated 20 amp circuit. Now it is hardwired to a new range vent hood. We relocated our microwave so a tile mosaic could be applied to the wall above the stove.

Don t overload your outlets. Holiday cooking will trip the breaker if you aren t carefull.

Just a thought. I thought I read where it is code to have at least 15 inches of counter space adjacent to the stove to provide a place to sit pots or pans. Have you checked that out? I read it on the internet so it must be true! :-)

- MTStringer

Thanks. What I meant was what else do you put in the cabinet? Does it have a duct and outlet? just an outlet? Do you store anything in it? Or is it really a waste of space with no actual use other than to hide that outlet and/or duct?

Also, I probably should have asked if your stove is gas or electric. My current outlet at 55” height is for my gas stove which has a digital control panel on the front, plus the fan for the convection.

P.S. I have nightmares about the width of that base cabinet! I thought I heard 12”. Seriously, look at how cramped that wall is; what other options are there?!

- matermark

The microwave is a non vented model. It circulates the filtered air back into the room via vent slots on the top front so no need to vent up through the cabinet. We store other kitchen stuff in the cabinet also but do not plug anything else into the outlet.

Check out my blog.
http://lumberjocks.com/MT_Stringer/blog/42188
The pictures show where the hard wire is over the stove. It is now wired to the new range hood. The pictures also show where the microwave now is mounted adjacent to the refrigerator. We installed the outlet in the cabinet above it.

Note: I don’t have any suggestions for your stove location. It looks cramped.

I don’t know if any of this will help but I hope so.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View matermark's profile

matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#40 posted 09-30-2014 03:57 PM

The outlet for our microwave was above it in the small cabinet. If I understand it, it must be on a dedicated 20 amp circuit. The outlet is in a conduit box with an extender and the plastic duplex cover on it.

- MTStringer

Is the cabinet usable for ANYTHING else besides power to the microwave?

- matermark

No. It it is a dedicated circuit. We just ran it last week. However, in the previous location over the stove, there was a dedicated 20 amp circuit. Now it is hardwired to a new range vent hood. We relocated our microwave so a tile mosaic could be applied to the wall above the stove.

Don t overload your outlets. Holiday cooking will trip the breaker if you aren t carefull.

Just a thought. I thought I read where it is code to have at least 15 inches of counter space adjacent to the stove to provide a place to sit pots or pans. Have you checked that out? I read it on the internet so it must be true! :-)

- MTStringer

Thanks. What I meant was what else do you put in the cabinet? Does it have a duct and outlet? just an outlet? Do you store anything in it? Or is it really a waste of space with no actual use other than to hide that outlet and/or duct?

Also, I probably should have asked if your stove is gas or electric. My current outlet at 55” height is for my gas stove which has a digital control panel on the front, plus the fan for the convection.

P.S. I have nightmares about the width of that base cabinet! I thought I heard 12”. Seriously, look at how cramped that wall is; what other options are there?!

- matermark

The microwave is a non vented model. It circulates the filtered air back into the room via vent slots on the top front so no need to vent up through the cabinet. We store other kitchen stuff in the cabinet also but do not plug anything else into the outlet.

Check out my blog.
http://lumberjocks.com/MT_Stringer/blog/42188
The pictures show where the hard wire is over the stove. It is now wired to the new range hood. The pictures also show where the microwave now is mounted adjacent to the refrigerator. We installed the outlet in the cabinet above it.

Note: I don t have any suggestions for your stove location. It looks cramped.

I don t know if any of this will help but I hope so.
Mike

- MT_Stringer


You’re saying the cabinet with the pony clamps has an outlet in it? or the bigger one to the right of the fridge?

Did you post any pics with doors on?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

802 posts in 3164 days


#41 posted 09-30-2014 03:59 PM

Mind if I ask a piggyback question? I built a set of built-in cabinets/bookshelves in my family room, and I needed to be able to use a wall outlet hidden by the cabinets so I cut out a rectangle in the side of the cabinet to permit access. (The outlet itself is fine, flush mounted to the wall and everything.) Any potential issue there?

Also, in order to be able to power a TV above the mantle with hidden wires I ran a heavy-duty extension cord out the back of the cabinet, up a 2” gap between the cabinet and the wall, and into the hollow mantle. Could that be a problem? I know extension cords can’t be run in walls, but this isn’t in a wall – it’s just behind the cabinet – and it could be pulled out if there were ever an issue.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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Grandpa

3264 posts in 3731 days


#42 posted 09-30-2014 04:20 PM

I don’t think there is a restriction on drop cords as long as they are used as a temporary installation. They are for exactly what you are using this one to do. Power a TV is fine. You can power your sander in the shop. Same thing. The only thing I would suggest is get a good heavy duty cord with good ends. OOPS! you said that didn’t you….

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 4286 days


#43 posted 09-30-2014 07:30 PM

- MT_Stringer

You re saying the cabinet with the pony clamps has an outlet in it? or the bigger one to the right of the fridge?

Did you post any pics with doors on?

- matermark

The microwave is now installed adjacent to the refrigerator. It is mounted to the upper cabinet that is 30 wide x 15 high. The outlet is in that cabinet in the lower right corner. I can’t post any pics because my desktop PC cratered and all of my pics are on it.

Here are a couple of cell phone pics.

Hope this helps.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#44 posted 10-01-2014 01:58 AM

YES, that helped a lot! I’d have to measure the height where the hole in the chimney is if I want to try to vent outside using the old stove’s setup. Being on a super-low budget, I’d hate to build the cabinet and have it have little use besides aesthetics and a microwave outlet. Will have to check the microwave’s depth too, I somehow show a depth of 15-3/8” but don’t know if that includes the door handle too. If it doesn’t maybe I can make that cabinet bump out a few inches to accommodate the vent duct, wall it off, and still have room for plates…

Thanks.

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

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MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 4286 days


#45 posted 10-01-2014 02:33 AM



YES, that helped a lot! I d have to measure the height where the hole in the chimney is if I want to try to vent outside using the old stove s setup. Being on a super-low budget, I d hate to build the cabinet and have it have little use besides aesthetics and a microwave outlet. Will have to check the microwave s depth too, I somehow show a depth of 15-3/8” but don t know if that includes the door handle too. If it doesn t maybe I can make that cabinet bump out a few inches to accommodate the vent duct, wall it off, and still have room for plates…

Thanks.

- matermark

Does your microwave have vents on top of it so it can be vented into the kitchen and not outside? If so, it would mount under a standard depth cabinet (12 inches deep) and the vents would clear. Take a look at it. Ours can be configured either way. It might be a simple matter of blocking off the vent hole with a piece of sheet metal, a couple of screws…and some DUCK TAPE! :-) Our house never had vent duct work.

Just a thought.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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matermark

49 posts in 2403 days


#46 posted 10-01-2014 01:13 PM

YES, that helped a lot! I d have to measure the height where the hole in the chimney is if I want to try to vent outside using the old stove s setup. Being on a super-low budget, I d hate to build the cabinet and have it have little use besides aesthetics and a microwave outlet. Will have to check the microwave s depth too, I somehow show a depth of 15-3/8” but don t know if that includes the door handle too. If it doesn t maybe I can make that cabinet bump out a few inches to accommodate the vent duct, wall it off, and still have room for plates…

Thanks.

- matermark

Does your microwave have vents on top of it so it can be vented into the kitchen and not outside? If so, it would mount under a standard depth cabinet (12 inches deep) and the vents would clear. Take a look at it. Ours can be configured either way. It might be a simple matter of blocking off the vent hole with a piece of sheet metal, a couple of screws…and some DUCK TAPE! :-) Our house never had vent duct work.

Just a thought.

- MT_Stringer


YES, it has the vents on the top couple inches, they call it recirculating mode—air gets filtered and blows back into the kitchen. It’s a much easier installation, but I’d assume it would raise the temp in the kitchen.

The old gas stove was from the 1940’s and had a side heater in it. All the burners had pilot light flames running 24/7. it used a duct that went up a few feet and had a 90* elbow and connected into the chimney in the corner. It has a stainless or chrome round trim plate about 12” diameter at the chimney—the chimney bricks aren’t visible, it has plaster or drywall covering it. It looks to be entering the chimney about a foot down from the ceiling. When the new stove arrived, we just wrapped the trim plate with heavy duty foil and screwed it back on. I haven’t measured but assume it’s 5 or 6” round ducting, about the same as the gas dryer in the basement but I think chrome plated (haven’t seen it in a few years—been using the new stove at least that long.)

I will have to check on the building codes for that too. Grandpa wrote, “There are further codes for the pipe on the hood.” If they no longer allow this going into the chimney as original, then it will definitely go the recirculating route! Anybody know about this?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strict budget...

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