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View ColonelTravis's profile

Narrowest board you'd rip on a table saw?

by ColonelTravis
posted 07-07-2014 03:52 AM


23 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

8492 posts in 2571 days


#1 posted 07-07-2014 03:52 AM

I’ve ripped off of a 1” wide board before. Not ideal though.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12844 posts in 2801 days


#2 posted 07-07-2014 05:09 AM

1”, no problem. I don’t think twice about it until I get down to 1/2”.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View vskgaming's profile

vskgaming

83 posts in 2036 days


#3 posted 07-07-2014 05:26 AM

As long as i can clear the anti kick back pawls with the big orange Tool Designs push stick i am good, about 3/4”.

-- VSKGAMING

View vskgaming's profile

vskgaming

83 posts in 2036 days


#4 posted 07-07-2014 05:26 AM

Sorry for the double post.

-- VSKGAMING

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2213 posts in 2450 days


#5 posted 07-07-2014 05:38 AM

as thin as my Grrr-ipper can go :) 1/4” i believe!

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View DeLayne Peck's profile

DeLayne Peck

643 posts in 2622 days


#6 posted 07-07-2014 06:53 AM

Here is my shopmade Rip-Snorter Push Block Provides control and safety. Works beautifully.

There is a better way to go for really thin strips. Take a look at Rocklers Thin Rip Table Saw jig.

-- DJ Peck, Lincoln Nebraska. Lord, keep your arm around my shoulder and your hand over my mouth.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2739 posts in 2998 days


#7 posted 07-07-2014 08:39 AM

I’ve ripped down to 1/8” with no problems.
A riving knife and push stick (a sacrificial one in the case of 1/8” rips as my pushers are 3/4” thick) keep it safe.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4880 posts in 3469 days


#8 posted 07-07-2014 10:22 AM

1/4” very often

-- Bert

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4047 posts in 2409 days


#9 posted 07-07-2014 10:50 AM

Yes, one can rip narrow pieces but you need to stop and think it through first. A very good jig or push stick is needed. Remember that the thin pieces trapped between the fence and the blade can come out like a high speed arrow.

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

264 posts in 1852 days


#10 posted 07-07-2014 11:57 AM

I’ve ripped strips 1/16” with no problem. I prefer to use a zero clearance insert and if just needing a quick one off strip instead of doing an elaborate jig set up I simply rip half the lenght and lifit it up, flip it over and rip the other half and lift the 1/16” piece up. No danger of kick back or any problem. I use this technique on saws that don’t have outfeed tables. It’s a saimple safe techique I’ve been using for 40 years and I can’t say I’ve read any others dong this in the magazines or forums. Also I’ve been in the trade professionally for 40 years.

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5782 posts in 2141 days


#11 posted 07-07-2014 12:12 PM

As long as you have a push block of some kind that will stay behind the piece trapped between the blade and fence, while keeping your fingers a safe distance away from the blade, I see no reason for having a minimum width.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2711 posts in 3343 days


#12 posted 07-07-2014 12:17 PM

Cutting thin strips like this is why I make ten push sticks at a time. They get chewed up doing this. Makes it safe though. I keep the fence between me and the blade so that if there is kick back it does not hit me.

-- No PHD just a DD214

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5454 posts in 2772 days


#13 posted 07-07-2014 12:56 PM

1/4” for me, I have push sticks made from 1/4” stock.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1107 posts in 2466 days


#14 posted 07-07-2014 12:57 PM

I think I’ve gone down to:
  • 1.5” when I have the guard and pawls in place and a push stick
  • 3/4” with the riving knife and a push shoe
  • 3/8” using the Grr-Ripper

-- paxorion

View NoThanks's profile

NoThanks

798 posts in 1950 days


#15 posted 07-07-2014 01:32 PM



I ve ripped strips 1/16” with no problem. I prefer to use a zero clearance insert and if just needing a quick one off strip instead of doing an elaborate jig set up I simply rip half the lenght and lifit it up, flip it over and rip the other half and lift the 1/16” piece up. No danger of kick back or any problem. I use this technique on saws that don t have outfeed tables. It s a saimple safe techique I ve been using for 40 years and I can t say I ve read any others dong this in the magazines or forums. Also I ve been in the trade professionally for 40 years.

- rick1955


Ditto,
Do it all the time.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

986 posts in 1942 days


#16 posted 07-07-2014 01:43 PM

When doing bent lamination it’s common to go 1/16” or less. There’s really no other good option.

View jswoodworker's profile

jswoodworker

23 posts in 1954 days


#17 posted 07-07-2014 01:45 PM

I made a jig this weekend to rip thin 1/4” strips out of 2” thick material. I took each board down to 1/2” and ripped into two 1/4” strips. Was a little nervous cutting something that thick into narrow strips, but did it without incident. I would prefer to do operations like this on the bandsaw, but have to wait for my new blade to come in.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1581 posts in 2151 days


#18 posted 07-07-2014 01:49 PM

Post # 10 explains it all. Looks like Rick’s been doing it as long as I, and we’re on the same page…. I’ve ripped 1/4” square X 2” long without problems, and probably would do 1/8” x 2” if there was a need. If your bread and butter derives from woodworking, you really do learn to take advantage of your quipment’s full potential.
I did rip about 20 pieces 1/16” x 48” long by cutting through the full length to proove to a bow maker that with good square equipment, it can be done. A good comfortable simple push stick is a must. If you don’t like the feel, make another design that you feel comfy with.

Where were all you guys that are advocating this when I was getting beat up by the poster and another about squaring up 3/4×3/4 x 5” bandsaw cut pieces?? ......... Jerry (in Tucson).

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View NoThanks's profile

NoThanks

798 posts in 1950 days


#19 posted 07-07-2014 02:02 PM


Where were all you guys that are advocating this when I was getting beat up by the poster and another about squaring up 3/4×3/4 x 5” bandsaw cut pieces?? ......... Jerry (in Tucson).

- Nubsnstubs

http://lumberjocks.com/replies/838155 ;)

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

8492 posts in 2571 days


#20 posted 07-07-2014 02:25 PM

5” is a bit short to be ripping on a tablesaw. I don’t like ripping less than the blade diameter of 10”.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Mike67's profile

Mike67

97 posts in 3757 days


#21 posted 07-07-2014 02:55 PM

It sounds like your main concern is keeping the board from tipping into the blade. You can safely rip boards that are narrower than they are wide but you probably want to use a feather board to make sure the work stays tight to the fence. At some point it would be easier to just use the planer – for instance if you have a 1/4” board and need to rip it down to 1/8”. In that case, I wouldn’t use the saw at all. I’d use the lunchbox planer or drum sander.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1594 posts in 1845 days


#22 posted 07-07-2014 03:21 PM

My table saw is pretty old so I do not have a riving knife. I used to go down to whatever I needed before getting the Infinity Thin Rip Guide using a piece of modified 2×4 as a push stick. It was sacrificial.

I prefer the Infinity thin rip guide jig in conjunction with a thin kerf splitter in a zero clearance fence. Just a safer way to work.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 2101 days


#23 posted 07-07-2014 03:36 PM

The Grr-riper is a great accessory when working with smaller pieces or ripping off thick strips on a table saw. Even with a riving knife or splitter (you can’t typically use a blade guard on thin pieces) the ability to support both sides of the cut evenly is a great asset.

There are other ways to do it of course but it’s the problem that device was built to solve.

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