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Any "ol arn" fans? Heres some of mine, show me yours!

by LyallAndSons
posted 03-11-2014 02:45 AM


29 replies so far

View Matt Rogers's profile

Matt Rogers

112 posts in 2939 days


#1 posted 03-11-2014 03:31 AM

Gloat, no pictures though.

Just two days ago I fired up my new old 1950’s Crescent Rockwell 24” planer for the first time after finally getting the rotary phase converter hooked up. Still getting it all polished up from the rust caused by dew this winter in storage, nothing bad, just surface stuff.

Also started the old J A Fay and Egan 36” bandsaw for the first time. Need to either grind the worn steel bandsaw guide blocks down flat or make up some lignum vitae blocks for it from a huge piece of lignum that I scored from a woodworker moving to Germany and liquidating his stock of wood. Anyone grind their steel bandsaw guide blocks flat again? These have about a 1/32” of wear going back 1/4” from the front caused by blade teeth being set back too far over the years, or maybe even just from the wear of the blades over 70 years!.

Still have to check to see if I should scrape the bearings of the old 16” American Jointer. Not sure of its age, but thinking ‘20s.

I also checked out the used Aget dust collector I just bought and found that it had some erosion of its impeller from abrasive dust at the aluminum foundry it was used at and the company said that it was made in 1960’s and has seen its fair share of use. Although 1960’s is not that old.

Old Delta drill press too and a huge 12’ bed 20” swing lathe of unknown manufacture.

Old but good stuff, however they do take some work to have working perfectly. Worth the effort however.

-- Matt Rogers, http://www.cleanairwoodworks.com and http://www.cleanairyurts.com

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bigblockyeti

6937 posts in 2690 days


#2 posted 03-11-2014 03:43 AM

I’ve ground steel guide blocks flat, works well to hone them as smooth as possible too. I’ve seen them wear pretty bad just over a couple of years with the gullets set just ahead of the blocks. I don’t doubt the back of the blade even when set correctly could have caused the kind of wear you mentioned.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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rustfever

797 posts in 4280 days


#3 posted 03-11-2014 04:01 AM

I use a Yates American 36 band saw, ca 1939, a Powermatic 20” planer ca 1960, and a Ritter horizontal belt sander from the ‘60s also. I also have a German made 30’ stroke sander that appears to be from the 1950.

All of these tools are simple to set up and they retain their accuracy almost indefinitely. Other than new tires on the Yates BS, everything is original and in great used condition.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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Aj2

3587 posts in 2767 days


#4 posted 03-11-2014 04:17 AM

Here’s a 166bd oliver I bought last year,Really just getting to know her,9 ft long almost 2000# 12 inch knives.Really smooth when it’s running.The tables and fence are super flat and a small adjustment can make a big difference.Maybe someday I can set up the table with a longer straight edge.
My next quest is for 8 inch jointer.
Here’s the pic when I brought it to the shop and after I painted .

-- Aj

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LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#5 posted 03-11-2014 04:33 AM

I knew I wasn’t the only one! LOL! I sold my late 60s or early 70s Powermatic 20 inch planer and model 60 8 inch jointer and set up a Delta 15 inch (a 450 pound machine so you KNOW it was made back in the day!) and the 12 inch jointer. Kind of a trade off to make room for the big jointer.

We will be building a new shop this summer and I’ll have some room again. I have my eye on a 36 Cressent bandsaw myself. Do I NEED it, well, no. Will I buy it anyway? Yep, as soon as I’m under roof!

I use a small power feeder on the jointer and, while the Grizzly I have works just fine, I’d love to find an old USA made replacement. Any ideas? Same with the drill press. I have a new Porter Cable from Lowe’s that actually does a very good job bt I’d love to have the 60’s era Delta from which it’s cloned.

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

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LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#6 posted 03-11-2014 04:36 AM

Looks great A2J. I’m not sure how long the bed is on my big jointer but I know it weighs in at about 1600 without the IR motor.

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

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Loren

10930 posts in 4617 days


#7 posted 03-11-2014 04:50 AM

How do you figure that’s a Fay & Egan?

I’ve never seen a pic of a Fay & Egan pedestal jointer that
looked at all like that.

...looks similar to a 1930s era Teichert & Sohn 16” jointer I have,
made in Germany. http://lumberjocks.com/topics/57651

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LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#8 posted 03-11-2014 05:14 AM

Loren, As I said, I’m not sure it is. I was told that was the maker and I can find no markings at all. I have also talked to and seen pictures of several like mine online. It uses the square cutterhead like other F&E I have seen right down to the bold pattern and the table locks are the same as other F&E’s. If its manufactured by someone else, I’d love to know for sure. The base does have the same shape as yours but the casting isn’t the same. I may never know for sure but it looks like we both have nice machines.

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

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Loren

10930 posts in 4617 days


#9 posted 03-11-2014 05:27 AM

Owwm.com is the source for info on old N. American machines.

My machine was imported by a Los Angeles dealer and outfitted
with a motor they badged. I’ve seen their badge before and
I think they were in St. Louis too so they were selling imported
machines all over the country pre-ww2. This was a golden
age of big American iron so my guess is, considering the
basic fence of my jointer, that the imports must have
been delivering more machine for the money in some way.

If you crawl under the tables you may find part number
markings there from the foundry. Fay & Egan had a complex
history but was consolidated at some point and better
documented after that.

You might acquire the Dana Batory book that covers Fay
& Egan… or send the guy a picture and ask him what
he thinks.

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LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#10 posted 03-11-2014 05:32 AM

Loren,
Here’s the info I was going on. I knew I had it somewhere! LOL!

Time frame is from 1889- 1916, but looks to be a model from 1900-1910.

The company was the Greaves & Klusman Co. The manufacturing facility was located at 65 & 67 Plum Street. Cincinnati, OH. In 1889 William Greeves left his partner Herman Klusman and went to start a new company Acme-Greaves Machine tool Co. A few months later he left to form a new company with his 3 sons and renamed the company Greaves Machine Tool Co. The company was later acquired by J.A. Fay & Egan Co. the year in which that happened is not stated in the archives. Some of the records kept were not diligent and depended on the manufacturer as well.

Greaves & Klusman jointer’s are not a common machine found in the OWWM industry today. They were modest in scope but were quality machines.

They made a 12/16/20/24 & 30”. The bearings on the cutter head are of Babbitt design, Ball bearing/sleeve did not come out until the 1920’s. it is a forged 4 slot square cutter head and could be used to install 2 shaper blades as well for moldings with out removing the 2 straight blades.

The tables on both sides are a ribbed construction and the rear table is slotted for rabbiting. the weight on the jointer is 1600lbs +/- a few and when it initially came off the production line they were powered off a main ceiling mounted line jack shaft . The motor that is with my jointer is of vintage era GE The date is hard to say but I think around 1920-30’s.

The only other info I’ve found reads as F&E acquired the company around 1900 so I think that’s the maker. Who knows? LOL!

Also, notice the motor mount swing arm. Mine has the hole in the base (both sides) but the arm is long gone

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

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LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#11 posted 03-11-2014 05:35 AM

Thanks Loren. I’ll give that a shot. I love the machine but would really like to know the history behind it as well

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

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Loren

10930 posts in 4617 days


#12 posted 03-11-2014 05:37 AM

That’s interesting.

Either a lot of stuff got scrapped or it was possible in the
old days to make machines in small quantities.

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LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#13 posted 03-11-2014 05:44 AM

I didn’t notice any part numbers under the tables but you have me wondering if I just missed them? I think I can slide them back and check without throwing everything off too much. I’ll give it a shot tomorrow. Thanks for the info!

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

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unbob

810 posts in 2873 days


#14 posted 03-11-2014 05:51 AM

One of the oldest machines I have, 1959 Powermatic 160 planer out of a Montana school.
Very little use, original unrestored time machine. Oddly came with the single phase motor installed, but the original 3phase motor came with it also.

View AnonymousRequest's profile

AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 2518 days


#15 posted 03-11-2014 06:26 AM

Here’s a few. Cresent Hollow Chisel Mortiser. 1930-40’s, not sure. Electrical upgrade. Runs like a champ. It is still setting on a pallet. I need to build a picking device to set it and then paint. Around 950 lbs. I believe.

1949 Dewalt 12” Radial Arm Saw, GP Motor completely rebuilt, new electrical, ways and paint. Saw hasn’t been fired up yet. I need to finish the table and run wiring to it.

1974 Delta Unisaw, Brand new 3 hp., 1 ph. Leeson motor. New spindle bearings and paint. 54” Bies fence.

I’ll post some more when I get time.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13543 posts in 3350 days


#16 posted 03-11-2014 01:51 PM

No big iron but since you posted a King Seeley Craftsman, here’s mine.

Converted to variable speed w/DC motor

Also have this, but it barely has any iron in it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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bonesbr549

1588 posts in 4037 days


#17 posted 03-11-2014 03:28 PM

I’ve got a few

Delta 1934 14” Bandsaw
Walker-Turner 16” Bandsaw
60’s vintage Northfiedl 18” planer

http://youtu.be/ufIlay_PrVI

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Minorhero's profile

Minorhero

373 posts in 3574 days


#18 posted 03-11-2014 09:18 PM

My entire shop is old arn at this point and I am more or less always looking for more ;). When I buy a machine I take it completely apart and then restore it. Here are a couple of pictures of the finished machines.

1950’s 24” Walker Turner Scroll Saw:

1950’s Craftsman Drill Press:

An old J-170 Lathe from Brodhead Garret (Yates American after they were bought out):

And here is a picture of my oldest machine in my current restoration project. A Wallace Mortiser from somewhere between 1900 and 1930.

The mortiser weighs about 400 lbs and was hilariously considered to be the “portable” version. It has a funny looking head casting on the motor because it was originally sold with a wool cozy that fit around the top and filtered out sawdust from the motor while allowing it to be air cooled.

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ChuckV

3348 posts in 4497 days


#19 posted 03-11-2014 11:51 PM

I have a Buffalo Forge drill press from the late 1950’s.

I wrote about it here:
http://lumberjocks.com/ChuckV/blog/11104

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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Woodmaster1

1615 posts in 3557 days


#20 posted 03-12-2014 12:15 AM

Here is some of my old iron craftsman late 30’s.


1960’s Dewalt RS

Old Rockwell Lathe

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Slyy

2840 posts in 2625 days


#21 posted 03-12-2014 02:27 AM

Enablers, ALL of you!!! Plenty of “ol arn” hand tools in my shop, plus my father’s 80’s vintage craftsman table saw. But boy do I need to get on craigslist and find some nice tools like you fellas!!

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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CoachSchroeder

97 posts in 2573 days


#22 posted 03-12-2014 03:24 AM

Any thread about old machines must include a reference to Frank Howarth.
He makes incredible woodworking videos out of a very cool shop filled with quality vintage equipment.
Don’t know him personally but I kind of have this love/hate thing going (read jealous)

Here is a link to his youtube channel

Frank Makes

-- -Sam, in Wisconsin

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Woodknack

13543 posts in 3350 days


#23 posted 03-12-2014 03:32 AM

Almost forgot this, 20-30’s -ish Goodell Pratt

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View LyallAndSons's profile

LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#24 posted 03-12-2014 04:01 AM

Rick M,
That is the exact same lathe I have, actually, I have two that I bought as a package deal. One of mine actually does have the original crank adjuster to tension the belts. From what I understand, that’s a rare animal as it was an option on the machine.

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

View AnonymousRequest's profile

AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 2518 days


#25 posted 03-12-2014 04:07 AM

Love it, it’s all good!

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AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 2518 days


#26 posted 03-12-2014 04:42 AM

A lot of cool arn on BOYD (classified) today. http://www.owwm.org/viewforum.php?f=4

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Woodknack

13543 posts in 3350 days


#27 posted 03-12-2014 04:47 AM

This summer I plan on repainting both lathes; the KS/Craftsman in the same gold and the GP back to it’s original black & red. I read that Craftsman only sold the gold on certain years, ‘51 & ‘58. That model wasn’t around in ‘51 so that dates mine to ‘58. The KS/Craftsman has been a pretty good lathe. The previous owner hated it and rightly so, fit and finish was terrible with casting flash all over the place preventing things from sliding/working correctly. I took it apart, 20-30 minutes with a file and it is smooth as butter. Can you believe that lathe was around 55 years before I owned it and no one ever bothered to take a few minutes and make it work properly. I’m sure every owner for five decades hated that machine. It’s a wonder it didn’t end up in the dump. Good for me it didn’t!

I was using the KS/Craftsman lathe earlier today…

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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LyallAndSons

66 posts in 3566 days


#28 posted 03-12-2014 05:52 AM

Nice mallet too Rick. The story behind my multi machine score is I answered a CL add for an “old lathe for $50” When I got there, there were 2 KS/Craftsman lathes (only one had a motor) about 15 Craftsman lathe chisels, two chucks, all the pen turning stuff I could ever need including all the attachments, and enough kits and blanks for several pans ALL for the $50! Not sure the guys hand has recovered yet from slapping the cash in his hand so hard!

He also had a 60s Delta scroll saw WITH the original stand for $40 and a Delta 6 inch jointer for $75! He was getting rid of his WW equipment to make room for building fishing rods. I helped him make as much room as I could haul but the other stuff was gone by the time I could get unloaded and back. I even offered to pay now and come back for the rest but he wanted it gone. There were trucks sitting just outside his driveway just as willing to help as I! I sure wish I had been the first truck there that day….with my trailer. He said he sold a “about 20 inch bandsaw” for $50 right before I got there!

-- Lyall & Sons Woodsmiths...Custom handcrafted woodwork since 1989

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Loren

10930 posts in 4617 days


#29 posted 03-12-2014 06:21 AM

I’ve owned a number of old machines over the years but these
days most of my stuff is post 1990, including a couple of Swiss/French
INCA machines.

Here are the present pre-war exceptions:

1. jointer by Teichert & Sohn. I have the thing mothballed
right now as I don’t have room to set it up.

2. Bookbinding press. Most useful. About 700 lb.

3. Cheshire & Greenfield linotype saw/trimmer.

I have another machine by Cheshire & Greenfield, which has
fallen into neglect and I am ashamed to photograph it
in its present state. It is a combination machine used
for making dies I think… another printing industry machine.
I used it as a light overarm router for a few years making
guitars.

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