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All Replies on Relief holes when using large forstner bit?

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Relief holes when using large forstner bit?

by rooster
posted 02-01-2014 12:15 PM


26 replies so far

View NoLongerHere's profile

NoLongerHere

893 posts in 3763 days


#1 posted 02-01-2014 12:34 PM

nah…don’t bother. You’ll just make the large drill bit angry. Let it do it’s job. Definitely use a drill press if possible.

If you drill a small 1/8” pilot hole, you can flip it over and finish the hole to prevent blowout, if it matters.

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rooster

116 posts in 5025 days


#2 posted 02-01-2014 01:16 PM

Thanks Mark! I’ll just use the larger press.

I’m trying to build a wine bottle tree. 3-1/4” hole is a bigger task than I anticipated.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 4056 days


#3 posted 02-01-2014 01:51 PM

If that fails you could make a template and do it with a router.

View hydro's profile

hydro

208 posts in 2839 days


#4 posted 02-01-2014 03:22 PM

Try using a fly cutter like this one. It only takes a narrow swath of wood and your small drill press should be able to handle it. I have one of these and use it all the time for larger holes.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

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waho6o9

9019 posts in 3664 days


#5 posted 02-01-2014 03:28 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3636

Be careful using a fly cutter, maybe read Candy’s review on it.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 3777 days


#6 posted 02-02-2014 02:00 AM

The big drillpress should do the job BUT there are other ways: hole saw, router and straight bit with template, etc.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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a1Jim

118162 posts in 4664 days


#7 posted 02-02-2014 02:14 AM

A hole saw could do the job.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View rooster's profile

rooster

116 posts in 5025 days


#8 posted 02-02-2014 12:39 PM

Thanks all. I looked at a hole saw, the problem is that the material is 4” thick. I couldn’t find a hole saw that was deep enough. The larger press worked, but even on the lowest speed setting it hung up on occasion. After about 32” of hardwood, I could tell the bit was dull. Now for the next task of trying to sharpen a forstner bit.

I’ll post some pics when complete. Thanks again for the feedback.

View RodNGun's profile

RodNGun

118 posts in 3390 days


#9 posted 02-02-2014 02:36 PM

I drilled 250 3.5” forstner bit holes to make these wine racks. Big drill press, slow speed, headphones and a long playlist. Then I drilled the same number of small holes!

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rooster

116 posts in 5025 days


#10 posted 02-03-2014 12:44 PM

whoa. nice work. a bit more than what I was doing.

View Richard's profile

Richard

11310 posts in 4120 days


#11 posted 02-04-2014 03:25 AM

There is NO Problem using a Relief Hole! I use them when I’m drilling an hole with a Hole saw. Should be NO Problem for a Forstner Bit. It certainly won’t “Make It Angry” ...LOL..

The reason mine USE TO Smoke all the time was just that the Cut Sawdust had no where to go. Some Diagrams below of relief hole.

The Circle Cutter that Candy’s Article is about is a Cheap Piece of Junk from Harbor Freight. About $6.00 Bucks I think. (Pic Below) They didn’t mention that!

I have one from Lee Valley ($32.90) It works just Fine. MAX RPM Of 500/550! Faster than that and you’re asking for Trouble! Also Pictured Below.

It also cuts an “Inside” or “outside’ Cut.

Hope it’s of some help.

Rick


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-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View Tenfingers58's profile

Tenfingers58

96 posts in 3765 days


#12 posted 02-04-2014 06:18 AM

What I’ve done is clamp the board to the table, and drill a hole about 1/3 the diameter, then 2/3’s the diameter, then the full hole size. That way the bit isn’t trying to cut out all the waste at once.

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NoLongerHere

893 posts in 3763 days


#13 posted 02-04-2014 01:21 PM

Hey Rick, That’s a good idea with a hole saw.
The dust is fine and would drop through the smaller hole. I’ll have to try that next time.

But that crazy wheel cutter bit looks like a medieval torture device. Too scary! Ha!

He’s drilling a 4” deep hole so the hole saw wouldn’t work. he’s also using a forstener bit which cuts large shavings and wouldn’t drop through a small hole – probably just get clogged.

I’d clamp a fence guide to the drill press and use an air hose and constantly clear the hole and work area. Do short 3/4 cuts and then blow it out, that’s the key. Cut most of the hole, drill a pilot hole, flip and finish it.

The problem with trying to drill it out first is the blowout on the back – unless you plan on flipping it and finishing the holes. I see this as a huge waste of time. Just drill the damn thing already! Ha! and don’t force it till it burns.

You might have to buy a new bit too.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7702 posts in 4455 days


#14 posted 02-04-2014 06:19 PM

I would do like renners suggested with a router, guide bushing, and template?

I use that method when I need to make holes bigger than my Forstner bits plus you get left over large diameter hole plugs.

-- "It's fine in practise but it will never work in theory"

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2839 posts in 3384 days


#15 posted 02-04-2014 06:25 PM

The hole saw works if you flip the piece and attack the hole from the other side using the pilot bit as your registration. Not perfect, but it works. What’s the design that it has to be a hole in a 4 inch thick piece?

View Richard's profile

Richard

11310 posts in 4120 days


#16 posted 02-05-2014 12:42 AM

dhazelton: “The hole saw works if you flip the piece and attack the hole from the other side using the pilot bit as your registration.” YEP! Agree!

I measured my Larger Hole Saws last night. (3”, 4” & 6” Dia.) 2-1/4” to 2-1/2” cutting depth is not a problem.

I can also change the bit that comes with the Hole Saw to a Longer one that will more than penetrate through to the other side, as You’ve suggested for a “registration” mark , or starter point to use the Hole saw from the other side.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View rooster's profile

rooster

116 posts in 5025 days


#17 posted 02-05-2014 11:48 PM

dhazelton- I was building a version of this post by Paul from TN… http://lumberjocks.com/projects/92423

I guess you are right to flip the piece. I ended up doing that anyway with the forstner bit. Holes turned out great, but it took forever to drill them. I finished the project, but I haven’t taken pics yet.

View TZH's profile

TZH

603 posts in 4227 days


#18 posted 02-06-2014 12:09 AM

Here’s another option to consider: YouTube

I’ve also used Diablo router straight bits – really long ones – to do this. The first one is just a straight bit – no bushing. After drilling a pilot hole through the piece, I take the router with the straight bit and go around inside the circle. The pilot hole is drilled with a forstner bit. I then flip the slab over, change the router bit out and put the other one in. This one has a bushing on the bottom to guide the router on the inside of the circle. This method leaves a pretty nice surface inside and requires a little less sanding than others I’ve tried. If desired, a hole saw can also be used to provide a more definitive “guide” around the outside edge of the circle on the first go-round. I’ve found these straight bits to be really helpful in this process. Sorry, don’t have photos or video of my process…...yet. May have to talk to Scott (the guy who made the video I linked to above) to see if he’d be willing to shoot one.

TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3549 posts in 4031 days


#19 posted 02-06-2014 12:51 AM

You can’t flip the piece over and follow the pilot hole for the hole saw? I do that all the time. Any tear out hides in the middle.

View TZH's profile

TZH

603 posts in 4227 days


#20 posted 02-06-2014 01:08 AM

Tried that and found the pilot hole from the hole saw didn’t always line up perfectly. Didn’t seem to matter how many times I tried to get it right, it always seemed to be off a little bit which took an inordinate amount of sanding with an inflatable drum sander to get it down to a satisfactory “round”. If you have ideas on how to do that, I’m ALL ears because that would certainly be the easiest way to do this.

TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3549 posts in 4031 days


#21 posted 02-06-2014 01:13 AM

Well, one more possibility might be to hole saw one size under, then go for the Forstner. It wouldn’t have to hog out so much that way.

Of course, you’ve already put a square on the table for the hole saw from both sides approach?

View TZH's profile

TZH

603 posts in 4227 days


#22 posted 02-06-2014 01:25 AM

Thanks for the suggestions. Hogging out is an issue, that’s for sure. My drill press won’t handle that. Also most of the slabs I use are turned end grain up, so using forstner bits on those becomes problematic if they are too large (tried a 3 1/2” with an old B&D 1/2” drill and clocked myself in the shin even though the piece was clamped down the torque from the drill was so strong it whacked me a good one when the hole saw bound up – not too smart on my part). Also, the slabs are not in round to begin with as I do the more rustic approach in almost all of my wine racks:

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

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Kelly

3549 posts in 4031 days


#23 posted 02-06-2014 01:29 AM

Okay, that explains why squaring the table to the bit wouldn’t improve and why coming in from two sides would be an issue. The smaller hole saw still might help, if only for the reduced material removal and since coming in from two sides and not meeting exactly would be resolved with the final cut.

The only other thing I could see to do, at the moment, is come up with a clamp to hold each piece so the lack of squareness of the wood would no longer be an issue. Of course, you’d have to clamp a larger table to the drill table, for the (e.g.) 2×6 or 2×8 clamp sandwiching the wood to ride on. That would leave the holes lined up.

The clamp could be just 2x’s with 1/4” x 20 all thread and a couple jig knobs

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TZH

603 posts in 4227 days


#24 posted 02-06-2014 01:48 AM

You’re gonna have to do a video or provide a step-by-step photo album type process because I’m a little instructionally challenged with non-pictorial instructions. I think I get what you’re saying, but not totally sure.

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3549 posts in 4031 days


#25 posted 02-06-2014 02:25 AM

Your pictures showed that the wood was not square to the opposite side, so flipping it over would likely place it at a different angle, and it would probably rock. Assuming the piece you were drilling was no more than five and a half inches thick, you could lay it down, like you were going to drill it, then sandwich two sides with 2x’s near, but no less than the same thickness. Now, if you used allthread, you could pull the two 2x’s together, so they were clamped against your piece. When they were tight enough to pick it up by the 2x’s, you could drill pilot holes, follow those on the first side with the hole saw, then flip it over and finish.

The 2x/s should keep the piece stable and square to the bit or hole saw.

Is that more clear?

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/functional_art/

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TZH

603 posts in 4227 days


#26 posted 02-06-2014 02:53 AM

Sounds better, will have to try it and document with photos as I go through it. Won’t be able to do this for awhile yet because my thumb is still healing and I just don’t feel comfortable quite yet getting back into the powertool usage saddle. If you beat me to the punch on this, will you share your experience? Sounds like you’ve really got it down.

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

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