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All Replies on Ever see crown molding wrapped around a tight curve?

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View basswood's profile

Ever see crown molding wrapped around a tight curve?

by basswood
posted 01-13-2014 12:57 AM


30 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9015 posts in 3627 days


#1 posted 01-13-2014 01:02 AM

collins foot

View basswood's profile

basswood

264 posts in 2671 days


#2 posted 01-13-2014 01:03 AM

That cropped too much off. I’ll try another pic:

-- https://www.basswoodmodularllc.com/

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basswood

264 posts in 2671 days


#3 posted 01-13-2014 01:04 AM

@ waho,

I do cope inside corners.

I meant to ask about the outside corner curved around the bullnose corner.

-- https://www.basswoodmodularllc.com/

View wseand's profile

wseand

2796 posts in 4092 days


#4 posted 01-13-2014 01:07 AM

It’s hard to see the corner in the pic but I would assume either lots of small angle cuts, or you cut lots of slots in the back side, or i have no idea. Used plaster, steamed it?????

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wseand

2796 posts in 4092 days


#5 posted 01-13-2014 01:07 AM

I see it now.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3554 days


#6 posted 01-13-2014 02:06 AM

Makes my eyes cross…

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View patron's profile

patron

13717 posts in 4391 days


#7 posted 01-13-2014 02:11 AM

mitered segments
bondo
sanding

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

3991 posts in 2806 days


#8 posted 01-13-2014 02:15 AM

I’ve seen one kind of like that…but it was formed plastic, and not as nice as yours.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View Jim Baldwin's profile

Jim Baldwin

56 posts in 3409 days


#9 posted 01-13-2014 02:22 AM

Is this a test?
What I can see of it looks like a small outside corner-round.

I’ve turned these on a lathe mandrel from paper-glued blocks with a hole through the center (just like the base moldings) 4 corners at a time. I once had an 8ft circle crown turned on an outboard lathe faceplate. I’ve also milled them from solid stock on a shaper in stacked milling operations

Radius crown manufactured on-site from alternating strips, ripped vertically from two straight pieces of molding. The strips are applied one against the other and directly to the curved walls or forms.

Finally on large radius application, the crown can be milled in flat arcs. The arc segments are made to equal the base of an inverted cone which is equal to the radius of the desired curve. “Sprung Molding”

-- Jim Baldwin/[email protected]

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3554 days


#10 posted 01-13-2014 02:35 AM

Look at it differently. As wseand said, “I see it now”.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View BArnold's profile

BArnold

175 posts in 2883 days


#11 posted 01-13-2014 03:34 AM

Turn it on a lathe with a small tenon in the chuck. Shape the outside, then hollow the inside. When finished, quarter it and you have enough for four corners.

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 3487 days


#12 posted 01-13-2014 03:49 AM

I do it by cutting segments then filling and sanding. Standard way of doing it. That looks like a very tight corner, nice work.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View John 's profile

John

261 posts in 4452 days


#13 posted 01-13-2014 03:51 AM

Rip Crown into narrow strips then attach one strip at a time or use a small form. The only problem is you need 20’ of molding to cover a 4’ section. All depends on how many strips you need to rip it into and that will depend on the profile. REAL PITA but the finished product makes a big difference. Nice Job!!!

-- John

View GOOD LUCK TO ALL's profile

GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 2778 days


#14 posted 01-13-2014 03:53 AM

I doubt you did it this way, but another method would be to use a hot wire and cut it out of a block of Styrofoam then coat it with drywall mud, sand to finish.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3554 days


#15 posted 01-13-2014 07:54 AM

The second picture looks like a counter top.

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View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 4020 days


#16 posted 01-13-2014 09:03 AM

If that is paper stuck turning, what kind of paper would you use between segments?

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6474 posts in 3360 days


#17 posted 01-13-2014 10:20 AM

I don’t know how but it’s cool you did it. I like the traditional look better.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1055 posts in 2980 days


#18 posted 01-13-2014 01:32 PM

Jello mold.

-- Quote from ebay tool listing: " Has nicks and dings wear and tear dust and dirt rust and pitting but in good working condition"

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

908 posts in 2955 days


#19 posted 01-13-2014 01:38 PM

First guess: Lots of funhouse-style mirrors.

Second guess: Photoshop.

Third guess (least likely): woodworking.

just kidding, of course. Very cool. No idea how you did it. Enlighten!

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View basswood's profile

basswood

264 posts in 2671 days


#20 posted 01-13-2014 02:19 PM

A bunch of good responses here! Most of which would work… would work… heh heh.

Anyway, I would turn and quarter these corners for stain grade work.

I used techniques borrowed from the plaster trade. I did 6 corners, which would have required two turnings—this nudged me to go the plaster route. I made a profile knife, backed the corner with dowels and expanded metal lath.

A bonding primer on the ends of the wood crown and the dowels along with the the lath screwed stapled and screwed in place made these joints more stable and resistant to cracking than wood to wood connections in the house. I inspected the woodwork a year later and was impressed with how these corners held up.

The lath was double layered, one layer straight across the dowels and the other layer cone-shaped to support the profile just behind the face.

-- https://www.basswoodmodularllc.com/

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basswood

264 posts in 2671 days


#21 posted 01-13-2014 02:22 PM

Here is the wire lath shot:

-- https://www.basswoodmodularllc.com/

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basswood

264 posts in 2671 days


#22 posted 01-13-2014 02:29 PM

If you want to read up on the details, I wrote an article about the process for Fine Homebuilding:

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-to/departments/master-carpenter/sculpting-a-radiused-crown-molding-in-plaster.aspx?nterms=65282,65448

Also the second photo I posted here was taken by Chuck Bickford after a full winter drying cycle. This was in new construction, where most movement occurs during the first winter heating season.

I took the others photos.

-- https://www.basswoodmodularllc.com/

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118161 posts in 4628 days


#23 posted 01-13-2014 02:43 PM

Thanks for sharing that Brian,very cool.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View wseand's profile

wseand

2796 posts in 4092 days


#24 posted 01-13-2014 03:06 PM

Well done. Hope you got paid well for that.

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1055 posts in 2980 days


#25 posted 01-13-2014 03:19 PM

So what does Bill win?

-- Quote from ebay tool listing: " Has nicks and dings wear and tear dust and dirt rust and pitting but in good working condition"

View BArnold's profile

BArnold

175 posts in 2883 days


#26 posted 01-13-2014 05:58 PM

^^^^^^^^^^
Yeah, what Picklehead said.

I’ve done segmented corner radii for straight corners, but that would be very inefficient for crown molding. That’s why I thought turning a piece would be the way to go for real wood. Taking that a step farther, one would cut four slabs thick enough to handle the shape, bevel the edges, and set them in an angled circle. Glue them up and turn the shape. The four slabs ensure you have something near face grain on all four pieces.

I like the plaster/shaper approach that basswood posted for paint-grade projects!

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3554 days


#27 posted 01-13-2014 06:04 PM

basswood, if you stare at it long enough it becomes a counter top. Try it.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View basswood's profile

basswood

264 posts in 2671 days


#28 posted 01-13-2014 06:14 PM

DKV, it is a confusing image, if you don’t know what it is!

BArnold, that is the way to orient the stock for turning, for sure.

Yep. Bill (wseand) is the winner. He wins the art piece above:

-- https://www.basswoodmodularllc.com/

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 4020 days


#29 posted 01-14-2014 01:30 AM

Very interesting, thanks.

View wseand's profile

wseand

2796 posts in 4092 days


#30 posted 01-14-2014 02:00 AM

Hey, I’ll take it. A winner is a winner even if it is the Booby prize.

Edit:
There is only a few ways I know how to do that, and now i can add turning it to the list. Not that I could ever do that it that way.

That was a great editorial you did, well done. I really enjoy new learning new techniques on ways to do things.

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