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View DKV's profile

Question for the hobbyists..

by DKV
posted 10-07-2013 12:14 AM


28 replies so far

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3462 posts in 2857 days


#1 posted 10-07-2013 12:28 AM

I’d love a jointer, but I have done without by:
1) increasing my proficiency with a fore plane and jointer plane.
2) use a sled on planer

I also find that cutting pieces to closer to final length makes them easier to joint the faces.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3563 days


#2 posted 10-07-2013 12:35 AM

Charles, in other words you do prep your wood. You use handplanes and I’m assuming a router setup to flatten the boards. Nice…

How about you folks that just “go for it”? How do your projects turn out?

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3462 posts in 2857 days


#3 posted 10-07-2013 01:04 AM

I don’t use the router to flatten boards (with the exception of a live edge piece with a major convex top). Once I figured out how to use the fore plane and jointer plane (and having them sharp!), I’ve been pretty successful at flattening boards. I try to choose wood that is flat and that can just be run through the planer for the faces. I can flatten the edges pretty quickly with the plane now.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View RibsBrisket4me's profile

RibsBrisket4me

1554 posts in 3565 days


#4 posted 10-07-2013 01:09 AM

As any of you can see from my projects page, I am a hobbyist and pretty medicore woodworker.

My work was even worse before I got a jointer and planer. HAHA.

Edge joint, face joint and plane all by machine.

I need my stock as square as I can get to even get my medicore results. ;)

View Moron's profile

Moron

5048 posts in 4952 days


#5 posted 10-07-2013 01:22 AM

if you started out as a hobbyist ? and 43 years later returned as a hobbyist ?

can one comment ?

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View eddie's profile

eddie

8565 posts in 3673 days


#6 posted 10-07-2013 01:24 AM

i wish i had a jointer but tiil i do. to get it as workable i use a hand plane ,and the table saw ,and a planer

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View Mr M's Woodshop's profile

Mr M's Woodshop

426 posts in 4126 days


#7 posted 10-07-2013 01:26 AM

I’ve found that my 13” planer is essential for my projects. I can’t expect to find any given thickness of hardwoods locally (I live in the suburbs of LA). Want 1/2” walnut? You have to make it yourself.

I got a 6” jointer for Christmas a few years ago … and I hesitate to say I’ve never really used it. I’ve found that my table saw with Biesemeyer fence is accurate … and if the board is too cupped or twisted for the saw to straighten it out, I don’t use that board.

Will using the jointer improve the results I’m getting?

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com

View Moron's profile

Moron

5048 posts in 4952 days


#8 posted 10-07-2013 01:27 AM

I am hoping a jointer/planer can improve my skill set again

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1691 posts in 3683 days


#9 posted 10-07-2013 01:40 AM

I personally cant do work, I approve of, with out a jointer and planer. Miters dont come together, edges dont line up nearly impossible to square up. I admire guys who can get reasonable results with hand tools. Squaring lumber with hand tools is a skill I intend to learn…..now that I have retired. One glorious week so far.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View Moron's profile

Moron

5048 posts in 4952 days


#10 posted 10-07-2013 01:42 AM

well said jumbojack

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View James 's profile

James

138 posts in 3985 days


#11 posted 10-07-2013 01:45 AM

I use rough lumber and S3S from either the local hardwood dealer or from an online dealer. All the rough stuff gets initial milling but not final milling until I am ready to use it in project. The S3S stuff gets broken down in the smaller compents of the project and final milling if required.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3563 days


#12 posted 10-07-2013 02:01 AM

I should add stop blocks to the list. Unless all your pieces that are supposed to be the same length are the same length you’re in trouble.

Moron, you can contribute whenever you like.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View BArnold's profile

BArnold

175 posts in 2892 days


#13 posted 10-07-2013 02:28 AM

I’m basically a hobbyist, but I’ll take a commission under the right circumstances. I prefer to do what I want to do when I want to do it rather than be tied to a specific schedule.

In most cases, I break down rough lumber into pieces a bit larger than I’ll need before jointing and planing. If a piece is wider than my 6” jointer, I send it through my planer taking light cuts until a face is flat. In some cases, that requires putting it on a sled and blocking a corner or two.

I have a shop full of good tools that I could only dream of a few years ago. Many people I meet just don’t understand what it is to be a hobbyist woodworker. It’s interesting to have a conversation with people who ask when I have time for golf or tell me what a great boat I could have with the amount of money I have tied up in my shop. Some folks just don’t understand! :-)

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

View Jim584's profile

Jim584

26 posts in 2752 days


#14 posted 10-08-2013 05:04 AM

My lumber comes 5/4 and roughsawn I count on my planer and joiner. When I first started I just used my tablesaw for straight edges but as I progressed I found that I wasn’t satisfied with it. I recently bought a joiner and thus far am very happy with the results. Of course I am still very much a novice and have alot of room for improvement.

-- Just getting started.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3563 days


#15 posted 10-08-2013 06:14 AM

Jim, novice schmovice…if you do not start with flat, square and parallel you are frustrating yourself and not improving. I do not care if you use machines or hand tools you need to get it right before you start glueing boards together. Glad you have a jointer.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3209 posts in 3250 days


#16 posted 10-08-2013 10:30 AM

DKV,
In response to your question: I now only purchase rough cut straight from a sawmill that has a kiln for drying. My first project was completed using S4S pine from big box, very expensive. Reading all the usual woodworking magazines, I learned how to flatten by hand, and Ebay purchased several planes for this. I have a Delta 13” planer, my first major woodworking purchase, which I use to finish the other side. All edge jointing I do with an Ebay purchased Stanley number 7, which I’ve fitted with a cherry fence for ease of obtaining square.
As a hobby woodworker, all my clients pay me with a hearty Thanks. Recently, two of these family members placed orders for rather large projects, so I made a router sled to help with one face jointing. This project can be seen here. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/69304
I probably won’t ever buy a jointer, mainly because I don’t have room fit it in my shop (which my wife insists is a garage, HER garage.) However, what I now have suffices quite nicely, so I’m happy to continue as us.
Regarding your statement about purchasing a jointer, if so, then I’m curious as to why the question on methods to flatten lumber?

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 2808 days


#17 posted 10-08-2013 12:01 PM

Thomas Jefferson didn’t have a jointer and only a hand planer.
I start with this.

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 2808 days


#18 posted 10-08-2013 12:02 PM

Go to this( sawmill guy) Yup. I cheat. That’s a planer on da floor

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 2808 days


#19 posted 10-08-2013 12:03 PM

Wind up with these.

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5978 posts in 3410 days


#20 posted 10-08-2013 12:06 PM

I’d love to have a jointer and I would get one if I had room for it. I prep stock w/ a Stanley No 5 and 7 and the table saw and a lunch box planer.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Loco's profile

Loco

210 posts in 2808 days


#21 posted 10-08-2013 12:07 PM

But this wouldn’t fit so I “planed” it with a 4×24 belt sander. It aint da tool. It’s da fool.

-- What day is it ? No matter. Ummmm What month is it ? No moron. I paid for a 2 x 6. That means Two inches by six inches. I want the rest of my wood.

View knockknock's profile

knockknock

473 posts in 3232 days


#22 posted 10-08-2013 02:35 PM

I buy my wood at the borg, so it is S4S, and I only pick straight and flat boards. I square up and match my pieces with hand planes after I saw them. So far I have only done one miter, the base of my clock project. Using my shooting board with a 45 degree fence and paper shims, I got the joints to close with the assembly square and flat. I didn’t worry about the outside edges not quite meeting, after gluing the pieces together, I planed around the outside, evening things up.

-- 👀 --

View KevinH's profile

KevinH

128 posts in 4866 days


#23 posted 10-08-2013 02:39 PM

I started out with a table saw and a corded hand drill. I made a lot of pre-cut project kits for an after school program for kids at my church. I learned a little about cutting accuracy, small production runs and a lot about big box 1x lumber. Most of the completed projects had gaps from twisted, warped and curled boards, but the kids were proud of their accomplishments. I enjoyed the prep work and working with the kids.

Now I’m doing more careful woodworking and making gift boxes. I found a decent jointer on Craigslist and a Dewalt planer I purchased new. When I use them properly, the results are much more satisfying. These two items were worth saving for and making room in my small shop.

-- Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a rain dance. --Kevin in Happy Valley

View sras's profile

sras

5970 posts in 4188 days


#24 posted 10-08-2013 02:44 PM

Woodwork as a hobby. Never owned a jointer, buy rough cut have had a planer for 15 years. Between that, a hand plane and a table saw I get by.
I keep looking at jointers, but I end up preferring more floor space over having the tool.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1983 posts in 3028 days


#25 posted 10-08-2013 02:46 PM

I have a little benchtop jointer which works fine for small things. But I am steadily learning to use my hand planes especially on wide boards. Many times I use a handheld power planer for wider boards which works nice as kind of a scrub plane. And then I finish with my number 7. I also use my new 3 and 1/4 router with a 2 inch planing bit to do wide boards which works very nicely. I also bought a used delta lunch box planer a few months back.

I think I just look for whatever works or whatever I’m feeling like for the day.

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View lazyoakfarm's profile

lazyoakfarm

144 posts in 3856 days


#26 posted 10-08-2013 03:12 PM

I have a jointer and planer. I buy tools to try and compensate for my lack of skill. I’ve found you still need skill, The jointer is amazing, It has really made a big difference in quality and makes things go a lot faster. I use primarily rough cut stuff with a straight line rip on one edge. Anything that is surfaced in our area is just too costly. Plus its so humid its likely to need resurfacing. The jointer is my favorite along with my Incra fence. I dont even know how to pick out or use a hand plane. sad.

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 3563 days


#27 posted 10-08-2013 05:59 PM

Oldtool, a jointer is just my preferred method. I recognize you guys probably have different ways to flatten and square that are just as effective and yes you’re right I would like to discuss those other methods. I think it would be very cool if you did a video on the use of your router thingy? I and others would like to see that.

Loco, the door is very nice. Truly your wood needs to be flat and square to do a door. Unless, you were talking about the girl in the pic and yes she is cute. Daughter? Granddaughter?

Lazy, I don’t think buying a jointer and planer compensates for anything it just makes learning woodworking a whole lot easier. Personally, I do not have the patience for handplanes. I want to get to gluing boards…The only time I use a plane is to level inlay or with my shooting board to fine tune miters.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3462 posts in 2857 days


#28 posted 10-09-2013 01:48 AM

For those of you who say you don’t know how to use planes in this regard, I was in your shoes a few months ago. One of the most helpful articles I have read in woodworking is Christopher Schwarz’s article in Popular Woodworking, Coarse, Medium, Fine. Here’s a key quotation:

To my mind, people who think hand tools are slow are either using the wrong tool for a task, or they are people who will work slowly no matter what tool is in their hand. I have found that to become truly efficient at woodworking is to first ignore whether or not the tool in your hand has a power cord or a finely honed blade. Instead, you should make sure that you know whether that tool is a coarse tool for hogging off material, a medium tool for refining and truing the work, or a fine tool that’s the last to touch your work. This classification system – coarse, medium and fine – works for many of the tools of the craft, from sandpaper to handplanes. And putting each tool into its place is the first step toward knowing its true use at the bench

I now can pick up a rough board and in very quickly can joint one edge with a plane, for instance. I feel like his approach has helped me use planes and power tools more productively. You can find the article here: http://www.popularwoodworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/2-CoarseMediumFine.pdf

On a Craftsman table I made the other day, http://lumberjocks.com/projects/90426, I wanted to put a slight chamfer on the front edges of the table legs. Before CMF, I would have taken 10 minutes setting up a chamfer bit on my router table and testing on scrap pieces before running each leg on the router table. This time I took 2 minutes and used a smoothing plane to do it. Looks great.

I love power tools, but it is sometimes easier and quicker to use a well-tuned hand tool.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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